Grading Criteria/Rubric

 

The completed paper will be graded according to your ability to summarize and present the material (30%), the organization of the paper (30%), use of references (10%) and your ability to make connections between classroom material and your opinion regarding the government program (30%).

 

An ‘A’ paper contains a well written section describing the programs.  Data are discussed sufficiently and are supported with clearly readable tables.  The paper flows in a logical way such that any reader can understand.  The writer’s opinion contains language and theories studied in the classroom.  Finally, the references are correctly listed.

 

A ‘B’ paper contains a nicely written section describing the programs with some minor details ignored.  Data are discussed but tables are not clear.  The paper flows well but is primarily written to the instructor.  The writer’s opinion contains language and theories studied in the classroom with some minor errors.  Finally, the references contain minor errors.

 

A ‘C’ paper contains a poorly written section describing the programs with some major details ignored.  Data are discussed but not supported with tables.  The paper does not flow well.  The writer’s opinion contains little language from class and is not supported well using theories studied in the classroom.  Finally, the references contain multiple errors.

 

A ‘D’ paper contains a very poorly written section describing the programs with minor details ignored or described incorrectly.  Data are barely discussed and are not supported with tables.  The paper does not flow well and the writer’s opinion contains very little language from class and is not supported at all using theories studied in the classroom.  Finally, the references contain major errors.

 

An ‘F’ paper contains a terribly written section describing the programs with major details ignored or described incorrectly.  Data are not discussed and are not supported with tables.  The paper does not flow well and the writer’s opinion contains no from class and is not supported at all using theories studied in the classroom.  Finally, the references are unreadable.