COURSE DESCRIPTION AND REQUIREMENTS

Salisbury University

TARGET Program 2010

USDE Grant: T195N070327

 

ENGL 536 – Principles of Linguistics

 

Course Designer: ANJALI PANDEY

 

COURSE OVERVIEW

 

This course consists of a detailed and in-depth analysis of language on a number of linguistic levels. The course is divided into two broad sections with the first half of the course being a detailed analysis of the principles of theoretical linguistics, and the second part of the course focusing on salient areas in the current field of applied linguistics. Students are first exposed to linguistic principles at the phonetic/phonological, morphological, semantic and syntactic levels, and then presented with linguistic principles as these operate in the areas of Pragmatics, Neurolinguistics, and Sociolinguistics to name a few examples. To ensure that students are exposed to the fundamentals of linguistic analysis, the data for analysis comes from a variety of languages across the world. Since this is a course whose eventual outcome is the creation of educators who are capable of applying linguistic principles to the workings of language in the real world, the main outcome of the course, particularly for students seeking ESOL certification, is ensuring that students are able to effectively apply linguistic principles in the designing of innovative language learning courses.  By the end of this course, students should be able to apply the learned linguistic principles to a keener understanding of how language works, and consequently, have a keener understanding and appreciation of how key principles of language are most effectively taught. 

 

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The ultimate objective of this course is to ensure that candidates utilize their newly acquired knowledge of the systematic principles of language structure at the level of phonetics, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics and discourse analysis to design effective and appropriate goals, strategies and techniques to enhance their students’ listening, speaking, reading and writing capabilities in the realms of accuracy, fluency and appropriacy of usage in the target language being taught.  The specific objectives of the course include, but are not limited to the following list. It is hoped that by the end of the course students will be able to:

1. Apply their expertise in the sound system of language/phonetic principles to design strategies for ESOL/mainstream students to develop enhanced oral, reading and orthographic skills.

2. Utilize their expertise and understanding of word structure/morphology to trigger the effective development of oral and literacy skills in their respective ESOL/mainstream students in the target language.

3. Create effective language learning strategies incorporating the latest knowledge and theories in phrase and syntactic structure in order to assist ESOL/mainstream students develop their written and spoken accuracy in the language.

4. Design effective vocabulary enhancement strategies which are grounded in key semantic principles in a bid to assist ESOL/mainstream students to both acquire and use a wide range of vocabulary in English.

5. Enhance the social appropriacy of linguistic usage among their ESOL/mainstream learners in the target language via a strategic teaching of key pragmatic principles in both spoken and written genres, for both formal and informal contexts, and for a variety of sociolinguistic settings.

6. Design theoretically grounded strategies of effective teaching language to ELL students based on the information provided by actual practitioners in the field.

By the end of the course, students will have a greater appreciation of the complexity and systematicity of language structure at the level of sound, word, sentence and utterance and be well equipped to plan for effective language teaching. 

 

 

COURSE MATERIALS

Required Texts:

O’Grady, William, John Archibald, Mark Aronoff and Janie Rees-Miller 2010.      Contemporary Linguistics: An Introduction.  Sixth Edition.  New York:

            St. Martin’s Press.

Justice, Paul W. 2004. Relevant Linguistics: An Introduction to the Structure and Use of English for Teachers. 2nd Edition Stanford: Center for the Study of Language and Information.

Celce-Murcia, Marianne (ed.) 2001. Teaching English as a Second or Foreign Language. Boston: Heinle and Heinle.

 

 

Attendance Policy

You are responsible for coming to every class meeting barring any emergencies. There will be unannounced in-class work assignments, so always be sure to do the assigned readings. Consistent tardiness and absences from this class will negatively impact your overall grade in this course.  You are required to stay for the entire institute in this course.  Please keep this in mind throughout the course.  Your in-class work assignments will constitute part of the grade awarded for class participation/review.  If you are absent on a day of an in-class assignment, you will receive a zero for that assignment. If the reason for the absence is valid (such as sickness or any such unforeseen circumstance), make-up work may be assigned.  Otherwise, missed in-class work may not be made up. You are responsible for coming to class prepared every day.  If you miss a class, please contact one of your classmates or me, to find out what was covered in class and what announcements were made.

 

CELL PHONE POLICY: In recognition of the busy lives of students of the 21st century, cell phones will be permitted in this class only on modes of operation that will not disrupt class. You will be required to turn all cell phone ringers off, once class begins. Students cannot have cell phone conversations while class is in session. This class assumes professional conduct at all times, and you may be asked to leave this class if you fail to respect the professional etiquette due your fellow peers and instructor.

 

Laptop Uses: Use of laptops and other electronic devices assumes professional conduct at all times.  This means that unless designated as part of the content of the course, please refrain from surfing the web or checking e-mail while class is in progress as this is very distracting to fellow classmates. Users of Laptops should sit at the end rows of class to minimize distraction to peers.

 

 

 

Writing across the currIculum (wac) statement

All written work in this course including but not limited to the formal assignments such as the written assignments as well as the formal field report are in support of the University’s Writing across the Curriculum Program.

 

 

ACADEMIC DISHONESTY/PLAGIARISM Policy

The English Department takes plagiarism, the unacknowledged use of other people’s ideas, very seriously.  As outlined in the Student Handbook under the “Policy on Student Academic Integrity,” plagiarism may receive such penalties as failure on a paper or failure in the course.  The Department’s Plagiarism Committee determines the appropriate penalty in each case, but bear in mind that the committee recognizes that plagiarism is a very serious academic offense and makes its decisions accordingly.  Please familiarize yourself with the details below.

Each of the following constitutes plagiarism:

1.  Turning in as your own work a paper or part of a paper or a linguistic problem that anyone other than you wrote/solved.  This would include but is not limited to work taken from another student (even if the colleague gave you permission), from a published author, or from an Internet contributor.

2.  Turning in a paper that includes unquoted and/or undocumented passages someone else wrote.

3.  Including in a paper someone else’s original ideas, opinions or research results without attribution.

4.  Paraphrasing without attribution.

A few changes in wording do not make a passage your property.  As a precaution, if you are in doubt, cite the source.  Moreover, if you have gone to the trouble to investigate secondary sources, you should give yourself credit for having done so by citing those sources in your essay and by providing a list of Works Cited or Works Consulted at the conclusion of the essay.  In any case, failure to provide proper attribution could result in a severe penalty and is never worth the risk.

 

 

SPECIAL NEEDS: Any students with disabilities or other special needs, who need special accommodations and adjustments in this course, are invited to share these concerns or requests with the instructor as soon as possible.

 

 

STRUCTURE OF THE COURSE

In keeping with the goal of exposing students to theory, research and application in linguistic principles and ESOL teaching, each class meeting will focus on the three areas of:  theory/research, application and praxis.  As much as possible, time in each course will be divided into three sections each of which attempts as much as possible to cover all of the above areas.

 

REQUIREMENTS OF THE COURSE

 

1.   LINGUISTIC PROBLEMS/ASSIGNMENTS:                                 20%

2.   IN-CLASS WORK/REVIEW ASSESSMENT:                                10%

3.   FIELD OBSERVATION REQUIREMENTS:                                 15%                            

4.   WORD ETYMOLOGY EXERCISE:                                              15%                

5.  LINGUISTIC APPLICATION: PROJECT                                       15%

6.  REACTION PAPERS: Reviewing Rural ELL Programs:                        15%

FINAL PROJECT

7.  WORKING ELECTRONIC PORFOLIO                                         5%

8.  REFLECTIVE ESSAY FOR PORTFOLIO                                      5%

------

100%

 

 

1. LINGUISTIC PROBLEMS/ASSIGNMENTS:

Since this is a practical course on the structure of language, you are required to do all assigned homework exercises.  These are due in the next class meeting from the date assigned.  Please type all submitted assignments whenever possible to ensure readability.  If you choose to handwrite your assignments, please turn in your assignments in legible handwriting (stapled if more than a page long). Sloppy, unprofessional work will not be graded. Additionally, late assignments will not be graded.  Since most of your assignments will be out of your textbooks, please be sure to bring ALL textbooks to every class meeting. While this class encourages collaboration and working together, under no circumstances will copying of assignments be tolerated. 

 

 

*      Evaluation criteria: Your assignments will be graded on: 1. Linguistic   accuracy of the responses; 2. Comprehension of the linguistic phenomena in the data set assigned (phonetic, phonological, morphological, syntactic, semantic and pragmatic under consideration).

 

2. CLASS PARTICIPATION/REVIEW ASSESSMENT:

This course is a compromise between a seminar and a typical lecture/discussion class. All students are expected to:

            (a) Participate in discussions as much as possible.  (Since the course affords                             students the ability to analyze structures of English from both a theoretical and                  critical perspective, participation in group work is essential.)

            (b) Raise questions, and

(c) Critically evaluate reading assignments and participate in the material review    exercises.

In order to prepare you for standardized professional examinations, you will be given reviews on the course content covered in previous institutes. Consequently, please review all material covered in each previous institute before coming to class for the next institute. Additionally, there will be numerous in-class projects which will often be turned in.  

 

 

3. FIELD OBSERVATION REQUIREMENTS:

In order to afford students a range of workable options in the area of field observation, you are required to observe ESOL teaching in the actual field in order to fulfill nationally mandated NCATE guidelines regarding the preparation of teachers serving English Language Learners. Please choose an option that is most workable within your schedule as a teacher. Also, if at all possible, aim to choose an option that will give you the most exposure to practical classroom ESOL issues in rural areas. 

 

NOTE: Please give your own creative titles for the project.  There is no page limit. Please get started on this project immediately. It is due on January 24, 2010. (Institute 1V).

 

 

 

v  DETAILS OF THE  Field Observation Report:

 

In order to expose students to the applications of the content area of linguistics to education, students will be required to do a minimum of three hours of field observation in any K-12 educational setting in the course content area in which the student is seeking certification (i.e., ESOL). At the end of this observation, you are required to turn in a field observation report consisting of FIVE PARTS:

 

1.  An Introduction followed by a statement of your claim/argument. Your introduction could include a summary of the classroom experience including pertinent information such as: the Date, Teacher (contact information if available), Time, Place, Grade Level, School Name, School District, as well as a short summary of the class content over the three observed hours.

 

2. A Detailed Explanation of the linguistic principles you saw at work, based on what you have learned in this class so far. It is at this point in the paper, that you need to present your overall argument/thesis/claim.  If you observed no linguistic principles, analyze which principles could have been used to increase the efficacy of the observed in lesson(s).

 

3. a Detailed Evaluation of the strengths/benefits and weaknesses/pitfalls of the class observed particularly concerning the way in which the linguistic principles were either taught or not taught.[1]  Also, gauge how relevant/useful the content was to the teaching of English language learners).  Please provide supporting details for all points in the form of examples and make coherent and consistent links to your thesis/claim/argument.

 

 4. A Reflective Synopsis in which you explain why you think the teaching (particularly concerning principles relevant to linguistics) was either effective or ineffective, and what contingency plans/additional suggestions you would have for the improvement of the teaching (based on theories/content learned in the course).

 

5. Implicational Analysis: Finally, reflect on any implications of the field experience as this pertains to ESOL teaching in general, and rural ESOL teaching in particular.

 

NOTE: 

 

Practical conditions (i.e. for most teachers who only have planning time available for such observations) necessitate that the hours of observation need not be consecutive. However, it may be harder to write up a unified report for three different days—you may have to organize it as three separate sections—or try and maintain the uniformity by observing a consecutively organized thematic session rather than an interrupted session.

 

Since the aim of this course is to see linguistic principles at work, I would recommend that you pick a content area where you would probably see these principles at work--language arts; foreign language(s) or any close area and when writing your observation report in the section under "detailed evaluation of strengths and weaknesses" you can include two sections on:

1. ESOL Modifications: To what extent would the class have to be modified for any ESOL students present?

2. ESOL Applicability: What aspects of the class could be maintained even if ESOL students were present?

The key point I want all of you to observe is the linguistic principles if any at work. The eventual aim of this is to make you question your praxis, increase your confidence if an ESOL student were in your class, and make you acutely aware of linguistic principles consistently at work in any class (phonetics, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics and so on) in language teaching.

 

 

 

*      Evaluation Criteria: You will be assessed using the following criteria: 1 Details observed/; 2. Content of the report: relevant links to course content; 3. Organization/documentation; 4. Critical insight/Argumentative potential of your overall comments/findings regarding learned principles of linguistics and how these are being addressed/not addressed in area classrooms, and 5. Pedagogical insight of your overall comments on the experience (field observation) as this relates to ESOL students.  

 

 

4. Word Etymology Task: Where do our English words come from?

You will be assigned one word throughout the course that is part of English, but which has a unique history.

 

YOUR TASK (20 minutes of a presentation in the allotted time slot during institutes #4 and #5).

1. A short, succinct explanation of the linguistic origin of the word/phonetic details and other morphological information.

2. Its semantic history, and other pertinent information.

3. ESOL implications for teachers who may not be aware of the diverse multilinguistic background of English--i.e., how could such a word be used in an ESOL class, or any other class for that matter?  How would you use this word to teach about multilingualism?  Give one specific example of an activity you would use.

4. Any other interesting facts that the class could learn—additional creative research that you have done on the word or related words that come from the language.

5. Any links to class material that you can draw or link the word to.

 

 

*      Evaluation Criteria: This task will be graded on: 1. Creativity of your activity, 2. Organization; 3.Substance/content, 4. Application to class material; 5. Additional research. 

 

Presentations beyond 20 minutes will be cut short. Consequently, utilize handouts/PowerPoint as much as possible for extra material which you will not be able to cover in this time frame. Please rehearse this to ensure that you are within the time limit.

 

 

**** For all presentations in this program, you are required to turn in handouts containing a Bibliography/Reference Sheet as well as any material that will guide your audience in the comprehension of your project.  Please be sure to include your name and the title of the presentation on any handouts that are distributed. Please retain copies of all materials for your files.

 

 

 

5. LINGUISTIC APPLICATION PROJECT: AN ANALYSIS of current research.

 

Preparing for your first formal presentation: One of the key assignments of the course will be a critical analysis of an assigned reading.    The chart in Appendix 1 lists the article you are assigned, and the dates you will be presenting the article in class. Some of you will be presenting on the January 2, 2010, so please look at the chart and begin preparations immediately.

 

****All articles are from your textbook: Teaching English as a Second or Foreign Language Appendix 1 of your syllabus contains a detailed list of all the presentations in this area as well as the application questions for each person in the class.

 

YOUR TASK: Oral Presentation of linguistic Application Project

Your oral project in this class will be a task entailing the application of the linguistic concepts learned in this course to the designing of effective language teaching strategies. You will be required to do a formal presentation on your findings to the class, and will “draw” a presentation project during the orientation. Your task will be to analyze the reading using any of the theoretical principles of linguistics covered in the readings/course. 

 

*      Evaluation Criteria:

  1. Presentation of subject matter in a succinct, clear, logical and organized fashion.
  2. Ability to synthesize the summary, and critical analysis of the article with the novel application of concepts (based on the question given for each individual reading/ and the thesis or claim generated by you—see chart in appendix1).
  3. The ability to communicate your ideas in a logical and creative fashion in the four areas of: summary, analysis, application and self-evaluation.
  4.  Your ability to stimulate intellectual thought via the activities you design.  Please remember to have very concrete examples of activities that you propose to teach the concept.
  5. Your ability to suggest other areas of potential research/discussion.

 

NOTE: You are required to either create handouts with key points (especially for the summary of the article) or use Power-Point software so as to use your time wisely. If using Power Point, please have back-up handouts (10 copies).  Please get started on this as soon as you have the time. Please give unique titles to your presentations and always have your name on handouts.

 

DETAILED INSTRUCTIONS:

It is advisable to follow the timeline outlined below when planning for the various sections of your presentation.  To guide you in your presentation, an application question has been designed for you regarding the article.  You are encouraged to corroborate the chapter findings with research of your own.  Please go by the name of the article especially if the page numbers do not correspond.  In doing the application section, answer the question to the best of your ability, and provide concrete examples of the activities that you will be proposing to teach the concept.

Please time your presentation before coming to class so that you are aware of how to plan for key sections of the presentation.

Note: In organizing you presentation think about the following:

 

v  Organization: All handouts should have to have a separate bibliographic sheet. You can decide if you want to break your presentation down into various sections—for example:

§   Introduction of your claim/argument based on the question provided. Please ensure that you take an argumentative rather than informative stance from the very outset of your presentation.

§  Summary and analysis of the chapter;

§   Detailed literature review of relevant additional research;

§  Proposal of your strategies with a detailed analysis/justification,

§  Evaluation/critique of your strategies, and finally,

§  Conclusion with implications for further research and references.

§  Feel free to use copious examples from your own content-area to make points clear to your audience.

 

  

6. Reviewing a rural ell program: Reaction papers.  We will be having three guest presenters/content coaches from local school districts who will be giving demonstration presentations on current rural ELL classroom praxis. You will have to turn in short response/reaction papers (no page limitations) to these three demonstrations (Due: dates marked on the syllabus

·         Please take notes during the demonstration so that you do not forget salient points as they occur to you. Your reaction should include pertinent information such as: the title of the talk, the presenter, and the time and day of the presentation.  

·         The format of the response/reaction paper is dependent on you, but emphasis must be on analyzing the utility of the content of the workshop to your future ELL teaching career. You can precede your reaction/ critique/analysis with a brief summary of the main points of the talk followed by a detailed analysis/reaction to the presentation based on any number of points/issues you find intriguing.

·         Your reaction could take on any one of the following perspectives: highly positive; highly critical or a mixed reaction. (Again, aim for a clear argument) 

·         Links made to material learned in this class are strongly encouraged.

·         Please provide a unique title to your response essay. 

 

Evaluation Criteria: 1.Organization: Innovative/Creative; 2. Content: Insightfulness of the reactions/responses with clear theoretical links to class material.

 

Final project

 

v  Due in CD-disk/memory stick format on:   February 6, 2010 at 8.30 a.m.

 

 

7. Working Electronic Portfolio:

Your final project for this class will be the first part of your working professional portfolio covering course content and NCATE-TESOL standards. You will submit this electronic portfolio in the form of an electronic disk to include the following key elements:

8. Reflective Essay for the portfolio:

Criteria for the Reflective essay in the Professional Working Portfolio:

 

1. Introduction: Provide a short introduction to this part of your portfolio, and provide a short summary of its contents (the four artifacts you have chosen from this course).

 

2. Narrative:

1. Explain HOW you would integrate relevant content learned from the courses (as evidenced by your artifacts) into your present or future classroom teaching. Provide detailed examples from your content area.

 

2. Next, explain WHY you think the content of these artifacts is important to include in your present or future teaching.

 

3. Rationale: Demonstrate using examples from the artifacts contained in your portfolio   HOW you have gained knowledge or understanding of course content, and the extent to which your /artifacts meet the designated standards.

 

4. Reflection:  Refer to the NCATE-TESOL professional standard 1.a.: Describing language (see appendix 2 or listed website).

1. Provide a brief synthesis of the extent to which you feel that your four selections meet any of the relevant 10 sub-standards under 1.a in the above cited NCATE/TESOL standards.  Evaluate the extent to which they meet any of the three benchmark descriptors cited below and WHY. Provide an explanation—don’t just say you have met/exceeded the standard—give evidence using the descriptors provided in the standards i.e.,  

a) Approaches the specific standard

b) Meets the specific standard

c) Exceeds the specific standard

b. Evaluate the extent to which you feel you have as a professional met any of these sub –standards under Domain 1 and explain WHY. Use examples from your four artifacts. 

c. Feel free to highlight areas where sub-standards could not be met and reasons why (e.g., course work still in progress; a lack of access to gifted or talented students/ special education students or any other reasons).

 

5. Conclusion: Conclude by examining which aspect of this working portfolio was the most rewarding for your professional career so far and WHY.

 

 

*      Evaluation Criteria: FINAL PROJECT (Working Portfolio and Reflective Essay)

1.  Organization: (of the overall portfolio/clear tabs/buttons and divisions/links; organization and coherence of the reflective essay).

2. Critical insight (as evidenced in artifacts chosen; also embedded in the Reflective Essay: see above).

3.  Artifacts: selected choices, and with relevant links to the specific sub-standards in 1.a. (see, sub standards 1-10).

4.  ncate-tesol standards linkages: (four artifacts to address any of the sub-standards)

5.  Creativity/innovation: (of the entire portfolio/reflective essay).

 

MSDE/NCATE Technology Requirements

All students seeking TESOL certification should establish a working electronic portfolio, and include as many projects from this program in this portfolio. Since the working portfolio requires you to link representative work done in every course to TESOL/NCATE standards, you are advised to retain all copies of work done in this course, as well as work done in all subsequent courses in the program and keep updating your portfolio. You will be adding material from each course into this portfolio which will again be evaluated in your methods course so please keep updating material in this portfolio.  Please consult the following web page: http://trc.salisbury.edu/portfolio/Portfolio.htm for any additional details.

 

·         Samples of electronic portfolios  can be found at the following web-site:

http://www.salisbury.edu/ace/students%20portfolio%201.htm

 

E Requirements: Data collection

NCATE: Data Collection Statement

The M.A. TESOL at Salisbury University is an NCATE accredited program. In order to meet national accreditation requirements, and to collect data necessary for annual program review, selected samples from work completed in courses in the TARGET program may be copied and retained for review including videotaped teaching samples.  All material thus obtained will be kept confidential and used for the purpose stated above.  For further inquiries related to this matter, please contact the Chair of the English Department.

 

 

FOR STUDENTS SEEKING CERTIFICATION IN ESOL/TESOL: NCATE STANDARDS 1 AND LINKAGES

Please refer to Domain 1 on pp. 18-23 in the document:

 

http://www.ncate.org/ProgramStandards/TESOL/TesolStd.pdf

 

Standard 1.a. Describing Language: candidates demonstrate understanding of language as a system and demonstrate a high level of competence in helping ESOL students acquire and use English in listening, speaking, reading and writing for social and academic purposes.

Also please refer to the Rubric for Standard 1a. under section 1.a.1-1.a.10. standards which are very relevant for this course (pp.18-23) at the following web-site:

http://www.ncate.org/documents/ProgramStandards/tesol.pdf

The above standards are most applicable to this specific course though other standards are consistently alluded to—the separation is quite artificial. The chart below indicates the intended NCATE outcomes of the standard and the second column indicates the variety of assessments used in this particular course to meet these standards. Scores of 90-100% assume that the candidate “Exceeds Standards”; scores of 80-89% assume that the candidate “Meets Standards”; and scores of 70-79% assume that the candidate “Approaches Standards.” Below is the detailed link between outcomes and assessments to gauge the outcomes in this specific course.

Domain 1: LANGUAGE

 

Outcomes

Course relevant Assessments

Standard 1.a.:

 

“Candidates demonstrate understanding of language as a system and demonstrate a high level of competence in helping ESOL students acquire and use English in listening, speaking, reading and writing for social and academic purposes.

Also please refer to the Rubric for Standard 1.a. under section 1.a.1-1.a.10.

Linguistics problem sets as well as practical ESOL application exercises on:

·         Phonetics

·         Phonology

·         Morphology

·         Syntax

·         Semantics

·         Pragmatics

·         Evaluation of a field experience report analyzing the manner in which key linguistic principles of phonetics, morphology, syntax, semantics, and pragmatics are taught to ESOL learners with reactions to demonstration projects form existing ELL practitioners.

·         Research Project on word etymologies and implications for ESOL Teaching.

·         Evaluation of the design of   a lesson plan   analyzing the manner in which key linguistic principles   of phonetics, morphology, syntax, semantics, and pragmatics are taught to ESOL learners.

·         Customized Research application project: Utilizing knowledge of phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics and pragmatics to develop and design best practices for ESOL students in the area of listening, speaking, reading / writing, and other areas of academic expertise.

·         Evaluation of   an ethnographic field experience report analyzing the manner in which key linguistic principles of phonetics, morphology, syntax, semantics, and pragmatics are currently taught by master teachers to ESOL learners. 

·         Electronic display of artifacts and activities incorporating principles of linguistics/ESOL teaching.  Please refer to the appendix of this document to look at examples.

·         Reflective essay with a detailed self-assessment component linking course content uptake aligned with national standards.

 

NOTE: Rubrics (based on the evaluation criteria provided for each assessment) have been designed with specific links to all relevant standards assumed of the course assignments.

 

GRADING CRITERIA

 

GRADUATE CREDIT: Students will be assessed on all assignments using expectations of graduate school. Assignments, presentations, the field observation, and the final project will have to include a greater range and depth of exploration; an originality of ideas, and be consistently presented in extremely professional terms (such as at National and International conferences). The following grading system will used:

 

 

GRADING SCHEME

 

                                                90-100%:         A

                                                85-89%:           B+

                                                80-84%:           B

                                                75-79%:           C+

                                                70-74%:           C

                                                65-69%:           D

                                                0-64%:             F

 

 

NOTE: The syllabus that follows is subject to changes.  Both the pacing and the content will be dictated by your needs and intended outcomes for this class.

 


 

SYLLABUS

 

Engl. 536: Principles of Linguistics

TARGET-TESOL (Access Program): USDE GRANT: T195N070327

Course Designer:  Anjali Pandey

Winter 2010

 

Institute I: Saturday Jan 2, 2010

 

·         Required readings: Chapters 1& 2 (Chapter 3 is also useful to read,[2]) in Contemporary Linguistics and Chapters 1, 2, and 3 in Relevant Linguistics.

                       

Part 1                         LANGUAGE: A THEORETICAL PREVIEW

            Introduction to the Course: Requirements and Overview

Focus: Language Universals: Biological Specialization for                            Languages and Linguistic Creativity

                                    Read:  Introduction in Contemporary Linguistics

Focus: Grammar and Linguistic Competence

                                    Identifying Common Linguistic Myths

                                    Read: pp. 1-14 in Contemporary Linguistics

Focus: What is linguistic science? (Chapter 1 in Relevant Linguistics).

           

 

Part 11                        UNDERSTANDING THE SOUNDS OF LANGUAGE: AN INTRODUCTION TO PHONETICS

Focus: Understanding the Speech Stream, Sound Classes and Transcription Systems

                                    Read: pp. 15-40 in Contemporary Linguistics

                                    Focus: The Sounds of English: (Chapter 2 in Relevant Linguistics)

 

v  2.00-2.30: Presentation by Lauren

   Aural Comprehension Instruction: Principles and Practices.” by Joan Morley pp. 69-85.

Ø  Discussion/Question/Answer session (10 minutes)

 

v  2.30-3.00: Presentation by Jennifer

Teaching Oral skills.” By Anne Lazarton pp. 103-115.

Ø  Discussion/Question/Answer session (10 minutes)

 

v  3.00-3.30: Presentation by Eric

Teaching Pronunciation.” By Pat Wilcox Peterson pp. 117-133

 

Ø  Discussion/Question/Answer session (10 minutes)

 

 

Part 111                      THE SUPRASEGMENTAL FEATURES OF ENGLISH         

Focus: Suprasegmental Features and Phonetic Processes

                                                Read: pp. 40-53 in Contemporary Linguistics

 

Focus: English Phonology: An Overview

(Chapter 3 in Relevant Linguistics)

 

*      Language Files: Speaking  In Tongues Part One   

 

                                   

 

ASSIGNMENTS:

Due:  January 16, 2010 @ 1.00p.m.

Complete and submit on a separate sheet of paper your answers to 1. Question #3; #7 & #15 (on pp. 55-58) in Contemporary Linguistics and

2. The analysis of Korean (E3.12) on p. 86 in Relevant Linguistics (answer all questions—you may photocopy the page from your textbook and fill-in your answers neatly). (An optional assignment may be provided).

·         Please plan & complete your field observation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Institute II: Saturday, Jan. 16, 2010

 

·         Required readings: Chapter 4 in Contemporary Linguistics and Chapters 4 and 5 in Relevant Linguistics.

 

 

Part 1                          THE LINGUISTIC PRINCIPLES OF WORD                                                                STRUCTURE: AN INTRODUCTION TO MORPHOLOGY

                       

                        Focus: Word Structure: Derivational Processes

                                    Read: pp. 115-131 in Contemporary Linguistics

                                    In class work on relevant examples

                         

 

Part 11                        WORD MANUFACTURING SYSTEMS            

Focus: Inflection and Other Word Formation Systems

                                    Read: pp. 131-147 in Contemporary Linguistics

 

v  11.00-11.30: Presentation by Amy

Developing Children’s Listening and Speaking in ESL.” By Sabrina Peck pp. 139-149.

Ø  Discussion/Question/Answer session (10 minutes)

 

v  11.30-noon: Presentation by Dana

Vocabulary Learning and Teaching.” By J. S. DeCarrico pp. 285-299.

Ø  Discussion/Question/Answer session (10 minutes)

 

 

PART 111                  Reviewing Rural Programs: Content Coach Demonstration Project #1: Ms. Darra Elliot: Dorchester County Public Schools.          

 

 

PART 1V                   ENGLISH MORPHOLOGY: STRUCTURE AND FORMATION

                                    Focus: English Morphology: An Introduction.

(Chapter 4 in Relevant Linguistics).

Focus on Spellbound

   

 

 

INTRODUCTION TO MORPHOPHONOLOGY: IMPLICATONS FOR ESOL LEARNERS

Focus: Chapter 5 in Relevant Linguistics.

 

 

 

*      Language Files: Speaking  In Tongues Part  Two    

 

 

ASSIGNMENTS:  Due:  January 23, 2010 @ 1.30 p.m.                   Complete and submit on a separate sheet of paper your answers to 1. Questions #1; #10; #12 (on p. 147- 153) in Contemporary Linguistics.

 2. English Morphophonolgy Problems (E5.2) on p. 145 in Relevant Linguistics (answer all questions—you may photocopy the page from your textbook and fill-in your answers).

 

Ø  Reviewing Rural ELL Programs: Reaction Paper  #1 Due next institute.

 

 

 

 

Institute III: Saturday, Jan. 23, 2010

 

·         Required readings: Chapter 5 in Contemporary Linguistics and Chapter 6 in Relevant Linguistics.

Part 1                          THE PRINCIPLES OF SYNTACTIC                                                                              STRUCTURE: AN INTRODUCTION TO SYNTAX

                        Focus: Categories and Structure

                                    Read:  pp. 155-172 in Contemporary Linguistics

 

Part 11                        THEORIES OF UNIVERSAL GRAMMAR AND IMPLICATIONS

Focus: Transformations and Parametric Variation

                                    Read: pp. 172-193 in Contemporary Linguistics

Important: **Read Appendix on “How to Build Tree Structures” pp. 194-198 in Contemporary Linguistics

 

v  11.30-12.00: Presentation by Marc

Reading for Academic Purposes.” By Grabe and Stoller pp. 187-203.

Ø  Discussion/Question/Answer session (10 minutes)

 

PART 111                  Reviewing Rural Programs: Content Coach Demonstration Project #2: Mr. Victor King: Carroll County Public Schools.      

 

 

Part IV                   ENGLISH PHRASE AND SYNTACTIC STRUCTURE

                        Focus:  Chapter 6 in Relevant LINGUISTICS: Word Classes

 

Syntactic Structures: Focus on Beginning Transformational Grammar Theories

 

*      Language Files: The Linguists  Part  1   

  

 

 

ASSIGNMENTS:  Due:  January 30, 2010 @ 1.00 p.m.                              

1. Complete and submit on a separate sheet of paper your answers to Questions #2 and #5 (on pp. 195-197) in Contemporary Linguistics

2. Word Class Exercise (E6.1) on p. 211 in Relevant Linguistics (answer all questions—you may photocopy the page from your textbook and fill-in your answers).

Ø  Reviewing Rural ELL Programs: Reaction Paper #2 due during institute V.

 

 

Institute IV: Sunday, january 24, 2010

 

·         Required readings: Chapter 6 in Contemporary Linguistics.

·         Recommended reading: Chapter 8 in Contemporary Linguistics.

·          

****FIELD REPORTS ARE DUE at 8.30 a.m. Because of time constraints, no exceptions can be granted.

 

Part 1                          THE ANALYSIS OF MEANING: AN INTRODUCTION TO SEMANTICS

                                    Focus: The Nature of Meaning and Conceptual System

                                    Read: pp. 203-232 in Contemporary Linguistics

                                    Focus: Syntactic and Pragmatic Meaning

                                    Read: pp. 232-238 in Contemporary Linguistics

PART 11

v  1.00-1.30: Presentation by Ron

Building Awareness and Cross-cultural Communication.” by Eli Hinkel pp. 285-299

Ø  Discussion/Question/Answer session (10 minutes)

 

v  1.30-2.00: Presentation by Valerie

    Literature as Content.” By S. L. Mackay pp. 319-332.

                                   

Part 1V                       PRINCIPLES OF LINGUISTIC CLASSIFICATION: AN INTRODUCTION TO LANGUAGE PRESERVATION

            Focus: World Languages: Typological Classifications

Read: pp. 297-319 in Contemporary Linguistics (Recommended reading)

Focus: Genetic Classification Schemes

                                    Read: pp. 319-331 in Contemporary Linguistics  

 

Where do our English Words come from?

·         word etymology demo : Eric

·         word etymology demo : Jennifr

·         word etymology demo : Amy

·         word etymology demo: Lauren

 

*      Language Files: The Linguists Part 2   

 

                                    ASSIGNMENTS: Due:  January 30, 2010 @ 1.00 p.m.

Complete and submit on a separate sheet of paper your answers to 1. Questions #2 #3 and #18 (For number 18 identify both the implicature as well as which maxim has been violated) (pp. 240-244) in Contemporary Linguistics

 

2. Phrase Structure Practice (E6.8) p. 227 in Relevant Linguistics (answer all questions—you may photocopy the page from your textbook and fill-in your answers).         

Institute V: saturday, Jan. 30, 2010.

 

·         Required readings: Chapter 14 in Contemporary Linguistics and Chapter 7 in Relevant Linguistics.

 

Part 1                          SOCIOLINGUISTICS: THE SOCIAL

                                    MANIFESTATIONS OF LANGUAGE

 

                                    Focus: Theoretical Sociolinguistics: Studying Variation

                                    Read: pp. 485-514 in Contemporary Linguistics

 

Where do our English Words come from?

·         word etymology demo: Marc

·         word etymology demo: Dana

 

Part 11            Focus:  The Sociolinguistics of Language and Society

                                    Read: pp. 514-524 in Contemporary Linguistics

 

PART 111                  Reviewing Rural Programs: Content Coach Demonstration Project #3: Ms.  Mandy Butler, Wicomico County Public Schools:  

 

Part 1V                       LANGUAGE VARIATION IN THE UNITED STATES: A CASE STUDY

                                    Focus: English Dialects in the United States

                                    Chapter 7 in Relevant Linguistics

 

Where do our English Words come from? #9-12

·         word etymology demo: Valerie

·         word etymology demo:  Ron

 

*      Language Files: Speaking  In Tongues Part  Five     

 

 

 

Reviewing Rural ELL Programs: Reaction Paper #3: February 6, 2010 at 8.30 a.m.

And

FINAL ELECTRONIC PROJECT DUE: February 6, 2010 at 8.30 a.m.—No exceptions

 

 


 

Appendix 1

Presentation # 1.

Name of Presenter:

Lauren Webster

Article Assigned:

Aural Comprehension Instruction: Principles and Practices. by Joan Morley pp. 69-85

Source:

Teaching English as a Second or Foreign language

Date of Presentation:

January 2, 2010

Summary:

3-5 minutes  (Summarize the main points of the piece)

Analysis:

3-5 minutes   (Offer a critical analysis of the pieceto the best   of your ability)

research/Application Question:

10 minutes: (Question Adapted from the Text)

Question: If you were to design a lesson plan for intermediate to advanced learners of English (for any grade level of choice), demonstrate via actual examples a plan of teaching that would provide three ways to include specific listening opportunities in your class (based on what you have learned from the chapter) — even if the central focus in such a hypothetical class is on another aspect of language learning.

 

Note: Feel free to use examples from your content area to design the task.

self-evalution

10 minutes: Evaluate BOTH potential strengths AND weaknesses of your proposed strategies/activities.

Final reminders

NOTE: You are expected to use research beyond the provided chapter to prepare for the oral presentation of this task. Remember that your presentation should take an argumentative rather than informative stancei.e., argue why your strategies are effective.  Give your own creative titles. Please document sources using APA guidelines.

 

Presentation # 2.

Name of Presenter:

Jennifer Follensbee

 

Article Assigned:

Teaching Oral skills.  pp. 103-115.

Source:

Teaching English as a Second or Foreign language

Date of Presentation:

January 2, 2010

Summary:

3-5 minutes  (Summarize the main points of the piece)

Analysis:

3-5 minutes   (Offer a critical analysis of the pieceto the best   of your ability)

research/

Application Question:

10 minutes: (Question Adapted from the Text)

Question: You are to design a hypothetical plan for the following scenario. You teach an ESOL oral skills class where some students, perhaps because of their personalities and /or cultural backgrounds, are the most talkative and dominate class discussions, while others never speak up in class and even when called upon merely agree or claim they have no opinion. Provide three strategies to utilize as a classroom teacher that will equalize opportunities for class participation among your students.

 

Note: Feel free to use examples from your content area to design the task.

self-evalution

10 minutes: Evaluate BOTH potential strengths AND weaknesses of your proposed strategies/activities.

Final reminders

NOTE: You are expected to use research beyond the provided chapter to prepare for the oral presentation of this task. Remember that your presentation should take an argumentative rather than informative stancei.e., argue why your strategies are effective.  Give your own creative titles. Please document sources using APA guidelines.

 

 

 

Presentation # 3.

Name of Presenter:

Eric Christopher

Article Assigned:

Teaching Pronunciation. By Pat Wilcox Peterson pp. 117-133

Source:

Teaching English as a Second or Foreign language

Date of Presentation:

January 2, 2010

Summary:

3-5 minutes  (Summarize the main points of the piece)

Analysis:

3-5 minutes   (Offer a critical analysis of the pieceto the best   of your ability).

research/

Application Question:

10 minutes: (Question Adapted from the Text)

Question: Choose one pronunciation teaching point (based on the problems identified in the chapteri.e., the interchangeable use of the phonemes /l/ and /r/, or any other point raised in the chapter). Develop two activities for each of the five stages of the communicative framework to teach this point.

 

Note: Feel free to use examples from your content area to design the task.

self-evalution

10 minutes: Evaluate BOTH potential strengths AND weaknesses of your proposed strategies/activities.

Final reminders

NOTE: You are expected to use research beyond the provided chapter to prepare for the oral presentation of this task. Remember that your presentation should take an argumentative rather than informative stancei.e., argue why your strategies are effective.  Give your own creative titles. Please document sources using APA guidelines.

Presentation # 4.

Name of Presenter:

AMY GUTIERREZ

Article Assigned:

Developing Childrens Listening and Speaking in ESL. By Sabrina Peck pp. 139-149.

Source:

Teaching English as a Second or Foreign language

Date of Presentation:

January 16, 2010

Summary:

3-5 minutes  (Summarize the main points of the piece)

Analysis:

3-5 minutes   (Offer a critical analysis of the pieceto the best   of your ability).

research/

Application Question:

10 minutes: (Question Adapted from the Text)

Question: Choose a story, a poem, or a song that tells a story.  Obtain or make three sets of objects, which you could use in presenting the story (i.e., puppets, masks, dolls, pictures, posters, overhead transparencies, crafts etc.). Using the principles outlined in the chapter, tell the story to your classmates using each set of objects in turn. The aim is to present strategies to teach listening/speaking skills to children. 

 

Note: Feel free to use examples from your content area to design the task.

self-evalution

10 minutes: Evaluate BOTH potential strengths AND weaknesses of your proposed strategies/activities.

Final reminders

NOTE: You are expected to use research beyond the provided chapter to prepare for the oral presentation of this task. Remember that your presentation should take an argumentative rather than informative stancei.e., argue why your strategies are effective.  Give your own creative titles. Please document sources using APA guidelines.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Presentation # 5.

Name of Presenter:

dana hetzler

Article Assigned:

Vocabulary Learning and Teaching. By Jeanette S.  DeCarrico pp. 285-299.

Source:

Teaching English as a Second or Foreign language

Date of Presentation:

January 16, 2010

Summary:

3-5 minutes  (Summarize the main points of the piece)

Analysis:

3-5 minutes   (Offer a critical analysis of the pieceto the best   of your ability).

research/

Application Question:

10 minutes: (Question Adapted from the Text)

Question: Select one beginning text and one advanced reading text.  From one chapter in each, identify ten lexical items that you think might be pressing problems for learners.  Discuss three ways in which you would approach teaching these lexical items, first for the beginning level learners and then for the more advanced learners.

 

Note: Feel free to use examples from your content area to design the task.

self-evalution

10 minutes: Evaluate BOTH potential strengths AND weaknesses of your proposed strategies/activities.

Final reminders

NOTE: You are expected to use research beyond the provided chapter to prepare for the oral presentation of this task. Remember that your presentation should take an argumentative rather than informative stancei.e., argue why your strategies are effective.  Give your own creative titles. Please document sources using APA guidelines.

Presentation # 6.

Name of Presenter:

marc garlock

 

Article Assigned:

Reading for Academic Purposes. By W. Grabe and F.L. Stoller pp. 187-203.

Source:

Teaching English as a Second or Foreign language

Date of Presentation:

January 16, 2010

Summary:

3-5 minutes  (Summarize the main points of the piece)

Analysis:

3-5 minutes   (Offer a critical analysis of the pieceto the best   of your ability).

research/

Application Question:

10 minutes: (Question Adapted from the Text)

Question: Using key points raised in the chapter design an application lesson for the following task. Select a short text (e.g., from a magazine, newspaper, textbook) that might be of interest to ESOL students. Analyze the text from the perspective of these students. What aspects of the lexicon/words in the text might prove difficult to them?  Identify 10-15 words in the text that might be unfamiliar to these students. Place each word into one of the following categories: ++, +-, --.  Give three strategies for introducing words falling into the ++ category.

 

Note: Feel free to use examples from your content area to design the task.

self-evalution

10 minutes: Evaluate BOTH potential strengths AND weaknesses of your proposed strategies/activities.

Final reminders

NOTE: You are expected to use research beyond the provided chapter to prepare for the oral presentation of this task. Remember that your presentation should take an argumentative rather than informative stancei.e., argue why your strategies are effective.  Give your own creative titles. Please document sources using APA guidelines.

 

 

 

 

 

Presentation # 7.

Name of Presenter:

Ronald hollis

Article Assigned:

Building Awareness and Practical Skills to Facilitate Cross-Cultural Communication. By Eli Hinkel 443-458.

Source:

Teaching English as a Second or Foreign language

Date of Presentation:

January 23, 2010

Summary:

3-5 minutes  (Summarize the main points of the piece)

Analysis:

3-5 minutes   (Offer a critical analysis of the pieceto the best   of your ability).

research/

Application Question:

10 minutes: (Question Adapted from the Text)

Question: Create lists of common linguistic expressions or behaviors, each associated with three types of speech acts (i.e., agreeing, disagreeing; inviting someone to do something or visit, and/or accepting or declining invitations) and arrange them from the least polite to the most polite expressions. Identify the specific grammatical characteristics of: 1. the least polite and 2. the most polite speech acts.  Design a hypothetical lesson in which you give three strategies to ESOL learners as to when these expressions would be acceptable or unacceptable in real-life situations and how to remember these social uses of language.

 

Note: Feel free to use examples from your content area to design the task. 

self-evalution

10 minutes: Evaluate BOTH potential strengths AND weaknesses of your proposed strategies/activities.

Final reminders

NOTE: You are expected to use research beyond the provided chapter to prepare for the oral presentation of this task. Remember that your presentation should take an argumentative rather than informative stancei.e., argue why your strategies are effective.  Give your own creative titles. Please document sources using APA guidelines.

 

Presentation # 8.

Name of Presenter:

valerie Touboul

Article Assigned:

Literature as Content By Sandra Lee McKay pp. 319-332.

Source:

Teaching English as a Second or Foreign language

Date of Presentation:

January 23, 2010

Summary:

3-5 minutes  (Summarize the main points of the piece)

Analysis:

3-5 minutes   (Offer a critical analysis of the pieceto the best   of your ability).

research/

Application Question:

10 minutes: (Question Adapted from the Text)

Question: Select a piece of literature that you would use in your ESOL classparticularly a text that involves several cultural schemas.  Begin by analyzing the cultural schemas that exist in the text, listing specific details that contribute to each schema. Describe three ways in which you would make these schemas accessible to your learners (any grade level). 

 

Note: Feel free to use examples from your content area to design the task. 

self-evalution

10 minutes: Evaluate BOTH potential strengths AND weaknesses of your proposed strategies/activities.

Final reminders

NOTE: You are expected to use research beyond the provided chapter to prepare for the oral presentation of this task. Remember that your presentation should take an argumentative rather than informative stancei.e., argue why your strategies are effective.  Give your own creative titles. Please document sources using APA guidelines.

 

 

 


 

 

 

Appendix 2:

FOR THE FINAL PROJECT

 

 

NCATE/TESOL STANDARD: 1.a. –1.a.1-1.a.10

 

 The complete document can be accessed at the following site:

http://www.ncate.org/ProgramStandards/TESOL/TesolStd.pdf

 

 

 

 

NOTE:

·         A sample of a reflective essay is  also being provided for your benefit

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

[1] You could evaluate the class on any of the following areas: 1. Coherence of the lesson; 2. Variety (of activities); 3. Flexibility (what contingent plans did the teacher have in place if unforeseen circumstances were to arise).4. Creativity of the lesson in teaching language structure/language principles; 5. Content (how effectively did the teacher integrate theoretical knowledge of linguistic principles in the lesson’s design?). These are some suggested areas—you do not have to cover all of these areas.

1 The following standards are taken directly from the document “TESOL/NCATE Standards for the Accreditation of Initial programs in P-12 ESL Teacher Education”, (2002)-Draft prepared by the TESOL task force on ESL standards ” TESOL Inc. Please refer to the following web-site: http://www.ncate.org/documents/ProgramStandards/tesol.pdf

[2] If we have time, we will cover material in Chapter 13 on Brain and Language