COURSE DESCRIPTION AND REQUIREMENTS

 

 

ENGL. 533: ESOL Program Development

 (TARGET Program-2009)

USDE GRANT: T195N020327

Salisbury University

Course Designer: ANJALI PANDEY

 

 

OVERVIEW OF THE COURSE[1]

 

            This course introduces students to the theory and practice involved in developing and implementing ESOL/ELL programs in public schools with diverse newcomer language learners (K-12).  In exploring the complexities involved in planning, developing, and implementing an ESOL/ELL program, students will be made aware of educational law, funding priorities, as well as the cultural and socio-political factors impacting programmatic and curricular decisions both at the macro level (county, statewide and national) and the micro level (school policies, plans and personnel configurations). The course affords students the opportunity to explore the complexities involved in developing and implementing innovative ESOL/ELL programs, and sensitizes students to the cultural conflicts and biases: social, linguistic, and political, faced by newcomer, multilingual students with both formal schooling as well as limited formal schooling.  A specific part of the course will be to examine current challenges in the educational access of rural ESOL/ELL students. To prepare teachers for the actual writing and implementing of an ESOL/ELL curriculum/program where needed, students will be exposed to current successful program models across Northern America—particularly K-12 newcomer programs across the United States and Canada.

 

COURSE OBJECTIVES

 

By the end of the course, students will not only have a clearer understanding of the procedures involved in program design at the macro and micro level, but will also be able to:

  1. Display an informed theoretical understanding of established national and international ESOL/ELL program models, and key attributes of effective program design.
  2. Exhibit a detailed understanding of previous and current federal mandates regarding LEP students and their potential impact on program design models.
  3. Generate draft program proposals for uniquely designed/customized program models for rural schools at the K-12 level.
  4. Demonstrate a critical awareness of the specific details of national TESOL standards (language skills and content-area skills) in a bid to design and implement relevant and cohesive curricular content delivery in specific school and county-level ESOL/ELL programs.
  5. Possess knowledge and awareness of avenues of external and internal grant sponsorship in a bid to garner funding so as to design or improve existing ESOL/ELL program models.
  6. Display an informed theoretical understanding of the variables of learner, context/culture, classroom and linguistic input in the shaping of trends in program development via a detailed field observation experience task involving newcomer populations.           

The long-term outcome is to equip teachers with the expertise and confidence to design, implement and consistently improve ESOL/ELL programs for the benefit of all student learners involved in the educational process at the K-12 level and beyond. 

 

 

 TEXTS/MATERIALS

 Required Texts:

Houk, Farin (2005). Supporting English Language Learners: A Guide for Teachers and Administrators. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.

Pre K-12 English Language Proficiency Standards. (2006). Alexandria, VA.: Teachers of English to Speakers on other Languages Inc.

Samway, Katherine Davis and Denise McKeon 2007. Myths and Realities: Best Practices for Language Minority Students. Portsmouth, New Hampshire: Heinemann.

Schecter, Sandra and Jim Cummins (2003). Multilingual Education in Practice: Using Diversity as a Resource. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.

Walqui, Aidi (2000). Access and Engagement: Program Design and Instructional Approaches for Immigrant Students in Secondary School. McHenry, IL: Center for Applied Linguistics and Delta Systems.

 

Supplementary Texts:

Berube, Barney (2000). Managing ESL Programs in Rural and Small Urban Schools. Alexandria, VA: TESOL Inc.

Lucas, Tamara (1997). Into, Through and Beyond Secondary School: Critical Transitions for Immigrant Youths. McHenry, IL: Center for Applied Linguistics and Delta Systems.

Matluck-Mace, B. J. Alexander-Kasparik and Robin M. Queen. (1998). Through the Golden Door: Educational Approaches for Immigrant Adolescents with Limited Schooling. McHenry, IL: Center for Applied Linguistics and Delta Systems.

No Child Left Behind Act of 2001. Title 1 and Title III: Improving the Academic Achievement of the Disadvantaged. National Clearinghouse for Bilingual Education: George Washington University.

Richards, Jack. (2001). Curriculum Development in Language Teaching. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

 

Short, Deborah J. and Beverly A. Boyson. (2004). Creating Access: Language and Academic Programs for Secondary School Newcomers. McHenry, IL: Center for Applied Linguistics and Delta Systems.

Snow, M.A. (2000). Implementing the ESL Standards for Pre-K-12 Students through Teacher Education.

 

**** Additional readings will be distributed in class. 

 

Writing across the currIculum (wac) statement

All written work in this course including, but not limited to, the formal assignments, such as the written assignments, as well as the culminating project, are in support of the University’s Writing across the Curriculum Program.

 

ACADEMIC DISHONESTY/PLAGIARISM Policy

The English Department takes plagiarism, the unacknowledged use of other people’s ideas, very seriously.  As outlined in the Student Handbook under the “Policy on Student Academic Integrity,” plagiarism may receive such penalties as failure on a paper or failure in the course.  The English Department recognizes that plagiarism is a very serious academic offense and professors make their decisions regarding sanctions accordingly.  Since the research paper is a very important component of this class, please familiarize yourself with the details below.

Each of the following constitutes plagiarism:

1.  Turning in as your own work a paper or part of a paper that anyone other than you wrote.  This would include but is not limited to work taken from another student, from a published author, or from an Internet contributor.

2.  Turning in a paper that includes unquoted and/or undocumented passages someone else wrote.

3.  Including in a paper someone else’s original ideas, opinions or research results without attribution.

            4.  Paraphrasing without attribution.

A few changes in wording do not make a passage your property.  As a precaution, if you are in doubt, cite the source.  Moreover, if you have gone to the trouble to investigate secondary sources, you should give yourself credit for having done so by citing those sources in your essay and by providing a list of Works Cited or Works Consulted at the conclusion of the essay.  In any case, failure to provide proper attribution could result in a severe penalty and is never worth the risk.

 

 

SPECIAL NEEDS: Any students with disabilities or other special needs, who need special accommodations and adjustments in this course, are invited to share these concerns or requests with the instructor as soon as possible.

 

 

 

 

 ESOL/TESOL: NCATE STANDARDS[2] AND LINKAGES TO THE COURSE

Please refer to Domains 3 and 5 on pp. 40-50 and 61-68 respectively, as well as other sections relevant to program design models in the document: http://www.ncate.org/standard/new%20program%20standards/tesol.pdf.

 

Standard 5.b. Partnerships and Advocacy: “Candidates serve as professional resources, advocate for ESOL students, and build partnerships with students’ families” (p. 61).

Standard 5. c. Professional Development and Collaboration: “Candidates collaborate with and are prepared to serve as a resource to all staff, including paraprofessionals, to improve learning for all ESOL students.” (p. 61)

Also, please refer to the Rubric for Domain 3 under Planning, Implementing and Managing Instruction: “Candidates know, understand, and use standards-based practices and strategies related to planning, implementing, and managing ESL and content instruction, including classroom organization, teaching strategies for developing and integrating language skills, and choosing and adapting classroom resources” p. 40.

 

 

MSDE/NCATE Technology Requirements

All students seeking TESOL certification should establish an electronic portfolio, and include as many projects from this course in this portfolio. Please add any materials from this class to the working portfolio that you have established from the previous class.   Detailed hypermedia presentations done for this course can be included in this electronic portfolio.  When including your portfolio selection, be sure to include: (just some tips!)

  1. A brief narrative argument explaining why the selection will be integrated into your classroom pedagogy—explain why it is of importance.
  2. The extent to which the selected material meets outlined course objectives—show its connection to the actual course.
  3. A brief synthesis of the extent to which you feel that your selection meets a specific standard in the above cited NCATE/TESOL standards and your evaluation of whether it:

a)  Approaches the specific standard

b)  Meets the specific standard

c)  Exceeds the specific standard

Please consult the following web page: http://trc.salisbury.edu/portfolio/Portfolio.htm

 

 

Attendance Policy and class structure

 

You are responsible for coming to every class meeting barring any emergencies.  There will be numerous in-class work assignments. Since this is a very practical course, be sure come to class rested and alert. Always come to class with your textbooks and any assigned reading.  The short duration of the course will require that you take careful notes throughout the duration of the course. Your in-class work assignments will constitute part of the grade awarded for class participation/review.  If you are absent on a day of an in-class assignment, you will receive a zero for that assignment. If the reason for the absence is valid (such as sickness or any such unforeseen circumstance), make-up work will be assigned.  Otherwise, missed in-class work may not be made up. The tight schedule of this class will require you to manage your time very wisely. Professionalism, respect for your fellow peers, and a dedication to learning will be expected of all members of the class, and will constitute the guiding principle of this course. You are to view yourselves as potential program planners/coordinators for the specific counties and schools you represent.  Some projects will require that you work closely with fellow colleagues.  Please treat members of your team with mutual respect and professionalism at all times.

 

CELL PHONE/LAPTOP POLICY: In recognition of the busy lives of students of the 21st century, cell phones will be permitted in this class only on modes of operation that will not disrupt class. You will be required to turn all cell phone ringers off, once class begins. Students cannot have cell phone conversations while class is in session. Use of laptops and other electronic devices assumes professional conduct at all times.  This means that unless designated as part of the content of the course, please refrain from surfing the web or checking e-mail while class is in progress as this is very distracting to fellow classmates. 

 

 

REQUIREMENTS AND STRUCTURE OF THE COURSE

 

1. program planning: standards of access:                    15%

2. in-class collaboration:             standards analysis            15%

3. Roundtable discussion: Program models:                         20%

4. Reviewing real ELL programs:  Reaction:                 20%

5. The New Americans : Myths & realities:                   15%

6.  The New Americans Field Observation:                    15%

      outlining a customized esol/ell program                                                                                                                                                                             ------

                                                                                                100%

 

DETAILED EVALUATION CRITERIA

 

  1. Program Planning: Standards of access: During Institute I you will be given time to interview a fellow colleague using the access to school resources document on pp. 80-84 in your text Access and Engagement. At the end of the interview, you will submit the findings of the interview by briefly categorizing your findings in the form of: 1). What the school/school district is doing successfully; 2) Areas where the school/school district is failing.  3). Hypotheses/ solutions to solving the most current problems the school is facing (using the same budget and allocated resources).    4). Any other thoughts.  Please remember to include the name of person you interviewed and the name of their school/school district.

 

Evaluation Criteria: Organization (depth of findings/identification of key issues); Insight (thoughtfulness of analyses and solutions posited).  

 

  1. in-class collaboration: TESOL Standards analysis: You will all be asked to discuss, analyze and evaluate the TESOL standards (2006) using a number of systematic criteria outlined in the analysis of curricula standards by Gagne and Cameron (1998) namely, a distinction drawn between an envisioned curriculum, an enacted curriculum, and finally, an experienced curriculum (see, e.g., Schecter and Cummins 2003: 103 reproduced below for definitions).
    • The Envisioned Curriculum refers to the written curriculum mandated by districts or governments/organizations (the TESOL standards in your text).
    • The Enacted Curriculum refers to the events and activities that teachers actually plan and carry out in their classrooms.
    • The Experienced Curriculum refers to the ways in which children experience the subject matter they are intended to learn along with the unintentional learning that goes on (In this case, your predictions of impact i.e., how workable or how realizable  these standardized goals are for the students you teach?).

 

 

 CURRICULUM COLLABORATION: Creating sample plans using the 2006 TESOL standards

 

Your task will consist of the following three parts.

 

Part 1:  Usability of the Envisioned Curriculum

 Using the content-area and/or grade-level expertise in your assigned group, provide a detailed integrated “at a glance curriculum content plan” for any specified grade cluster in the school year which provides details about the following: (see 1-6 in the list below).  Please read:  “Ways to implement the Standards” pp. 101-113 and Appendix D pp. 144-147 in Pre K-12 English Language Proficiency Standards, as well as other parts of the text when planning the actualization of these standards.

 

1.      Choose one standard for your group from among the 5 provided which you are planning to develop in further detail. To ease planning, you could use tasks you designed for any previous course.

2.      Grade level Cluster: Specify your choice of grade level.

3.      Language Domain: You will be designing Listening, Speaking, Reading, and Writing summary activities (four sample plans in all for the same topic for a multileveled class)

4.      Topic: Choose only one topic but present its manifestation for all proficiency levels and all linguistic modalities —see Appendix D in the 2006 standards).

5.      Language Proficiency level: Your plan will be outlining details for all five proficiency levels (1-5) (Your plan has to specify sample progress indicators for  all 5 proficiency levels for a multilevel-class)

6.      Specify the content objectives.

7.      Specify the language objectives.

8.      Specify the support objectives for each of the language domains (see p. 105) for a sample plan.

9.      Specify the primary method/approach to teach the topic for the various levels

10.  Specify the major assessments.

11.  Predict unanticipated challenges

12.  Other key issues: Any issues not covered above.

 

Note: In order to present your “at a glance plan” you may want to use a chart with all the cells aligned. A model is provided below for Standard 1: Grade cluster: 8

 

Part 2: Critique of the enacted/experienced curriculum: Strengths

List any noted strengths of the 2006 Pre-K-12 English Language Proficiency Standards. What did you like about these standards?

 

Part 3: Critique of the enacted/experienced curriculum: Weaknesses

List any noted weaknesses of the 2006 Pre-K-12 English Language Proficiency Standards based on your expertise as an educator. Be as critical as possible.

 

Reminders: You will be divided into three groups of content expertise (based as much as possible on your actual training/backgrounds—see the list below).

 

NOTE: Please divide the work as equitably as possible, and report any concerns.   Non-participation of any member in a group will result in no points assigned to the individual for this task.

 

Note: Model of an “at a glance plan” for Standard 1: Grade cluster: 8

 (See next page).

Content Team 1:

  1. Jennifer
  2. Heather
  3. Lauren

Content Team 2

  1. Tara
  2. Valerie
  3. Tania

Content Team 3

  1. Rebekah
  2. Rita
  3. Ron

 

 

We will be orally sharing our thoughts in class so keep careful notes.


 

SAMPLE

Performance Indicators ®

Level 1

Level 2

Level 3

Level 4

Level 5

1. Grade Level

 

 

 

 

 

2. Standard

 

 

 

 

 

Descriptor ¯

Progress indicator¯

Progress indicator

Progress indicator

Progress indicator

Progress indicator

 Topic: Negotiating solutions to problems

Content Objectives: SWAT identify/list/describe/proffer advice or create guidelines to avoid common cultural misunderstandings

Identify examples of common cultural misunderstands. (see pp.140 for details)

List examples of common cultural misunderstandings. (see pp.140 for details)

Narrate examples of common cultural misunderstands. (see pp.140 for details)

Justifying the best solution from a list to common cultural misunderstandings with detailed reasons as based on scenarios provided. (see pp.140 for details)

Create guidelines to prevent common cultural misunderstands. (see pp.140 for details)

Language Objectives:  Specify the linguistic element of focus

Using receptive vocabulary (circling responses to emotion words)

Incorporating enumerators

Using transitional devices

Using  subordinating clauses/embedded T-units

Using the passive voice

Listening activities

Outline tasks

 

 

 

 

 Listening support

Outline support configurations:

(see. p. 105)

 

 

 

 

Speaking  activities

 

 

 

 

 

 

Speaking support

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reading Activities

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reading Support

 

 

 

 

 

 

Writing Activities

 

 

 

 

 

 

Writing support

 

 

 

 

 

 

Method/approach

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Major Assessments

 

 

 

 

 

 

Unanticipated Challenges

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Other Key issues

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

3.  Roundtable discussion: A survey of Program models: Depending on your Elementary, Middle or High-school teaching experience, you will be assigned a model program to share with the class. A maximum of 20 minutes per person will be given during the roundtable for discussion of the assigned program model—you will be penalized for going over the assigned time limit. The rest of the time (10 minutes) will be used for discussion (30 minutes per article):

 

Your task is to provide a detailed analysis of the program model contained in the chapter in the form of a detailed handout/power-point discussion to the class. Your presentation has to cover the following areas:

 

 Evaluation Criteria: Summary details; Depth of Coverage; Insightfulness of the Critique; Linkages to class and local school programs; innovation/creativity of organization/time management.

 

4. REVIEWING REAL rural/international ell programs: An Evaluation:  We will be having several ESOL coordinators/presenters coming from the surrounding school districts. After each presenter, you will provide your list of what you: 1. Liked about the program 2. Did not like about the program. 3. Some suggestions to improve the program. (You could decide to present this in the form of a chart.  Please identify the speaker and the county they represent when submitting your chart).

 

Evaluation Criteria: Content and evaluation: Insightfulness of the reactions/responses.

 

5.  & 6 outlining A CUSTOMIZED esol/ell program: the new AMERICANS FIELD observation

·         Your draft program proposal will be a cumulative project worked on during class meetings and will consist of carefully sequenced screenings of a three-year documentary project tracking the lives of seven immigrant families.

·          Your task will be in two parts:

·         1). identify four myths (general, educational or other stereotypes about newcomer populations) and four concomitant realities of newcomer populations in the United States as identified by this documentary—a handout will be provided (Due: Institute 4).

·         2.) Upon the conclusion of the screening, you will focus on writing a brief essay proposal that addresses the schooling/program needs of any one of the newcomers that you identify with in the documentary.  See details below.

·         A detailed worksheet is provided for this task at the end of the syllabus with a brief description of the final proposal provided below.

 

Question: What should an ideal program for language minority students look like?

 

Scenario: “Transformative educators seek to challenge existing notions of schooling rather than blindly reproduce the status quo.  To confront these notions, educators must critique existing practice and envision the alternatives.”  (cf. Short 2000:13)

 

Task: Following the conclusion of the screening of the award-winning documentary: The New Americans, choose one family/individual whose schooling needs are what you are interested in either 1. Planning, 2. Improving or 3. Developing.

 

Organizational Tips:

1.  Briefly outline reasons why this immigrant character appeals to you.

 

2. Clearly outline what programmatic problem/gap you are trying to resolve in your essay as highlighted by the documentary.

 

3. Carefully propose to create novel structures/ procedures or practices for resolving any of the problems you see identified in the documentary concerning the education of this specific language minority student/individual that you identify with.

 

4. Systematically specify how your plan/model will be:

A. Organized: (Specify the leadership team; the student population to be served; the goals of the program; the program design; the languages of instruction; and the location of the program—in-school/different location— among other aspects).

 

B. Designed/scheduled: Specify the course offerings; resources, daily length of the program, the daily schedule; the curricula standards to be used; materials selection procedures; transportation, and other relevant features of the program.

 

C. Implemented/Staffed: What will the placement/assessment/exit and monitoring strategies; assessment of program effectiveness and student success be like? What will staffing in terms of administrators, paraprofessionals, counselors; translators/interpreters; and parent/community outreach facilities look like?   

(Refer to the assigned chapter on “Establishing an Effective Newcomer Program” for specifics on these details)

 

5. Provide Links to class material or any of the readings presented.

 

6. Provide a detailed conclusion in which you chronicle some of the potential pitfalls to the program you are designing.

 

7.  Your essay proposal is in the topic of: “An Ideal Language Learning Program for Language Minority students”. However, please provide unique/original titles to your proposals (No page limits). 

 

Evaluation Criteria: Your performance will be assessed on:

1. The uniqueness/insightfulness of the myths/realities you identify;

2. Your observations/insight

3. The critical insight embedded in your final essay

4. The organization of your final essay (as well as your ability to synthesize/link explanations to course content), and

5. The innovation/creativity of your proposal concerning English Language Teaching/ program development for any of the characters that you identify with.

 

NOTE: The syllabus that follows is subject to changes.  Both the pacing and the content will be dictated by your needs and intended outcomes for this class.

 

GRADING CRITERIA

 

GRADUATE CREDIT: Students will be assessed on all assignments using expectations of graduate school. Papers, presentations and the research project will have to include a greater range and depth of exploration, will have to demonstrate originality of ideas, and be presented in extremely professional terms (such as at national and international conferences). The following grading system will used:

 

GRADING SCHEME

                                                                90-100%:A

                                                                85-89%:                B+

                                                                80-84%:                B

                                                                75-79%:                C+

                                                                70-74%:                C

                                                                65-69%:                D

                                                                0-64%:   F

 

 

 

 

 

SYLLABUS

ENGL. 533: Esol Program development

Salisbury University

Course Designer: Anjali Pandey

Summer 2009

Phone: Office: 410-677-5387; Home: 410-572-6033

 

Institute 1:      PROGRAM MODELS IN THE UNITED STATES: LOCAL STATISTICS AND NATIONAL MODELS

 

M Aug 3         Introduction to the course, syllabus and course objectives.

 

                        Part I: A Look at Rural Counties and Federal Mandates

                        Examining key statistics and predicting future trends.

A chronology of Statutory Mandates regarding LEP populations (1964-2001) (Chapters 1, 2 & 3 in Managing ESL Programs in Rural and Small Urban Schools)

 

Silent Reading: Myths and Realities-Chapter 1         

 

Part II: ESOL/ELL Program Models.

Analyzing the context for Effective Models: Creating pluralistic models, Managing school climate, Developing School-wide plans, and Analyzing staffing needs

What constitutes an Effective Program Model? — Examining some Preliminary Models.

 

Part III:  Program Planning: Access to LEP resources

Ensuring Access to Quality Educational Experiences for Language Minority Students: Conducting interviews on your experiences.

(Interview a selected individual of choice/take detailed notes –see syllabus).

           

                        Lunch Break

 

Planning Time: Standards Discussion (We have limited time so manage your time). Standards Alignment:

Review the 2006 TESOL Content Standards

Part IV: Analyzing TESOL 2006 Standards (Usability/Strengths and weaknesses of the standards)

                        Collaboration of Teams 1, 2 and 3  

 

Part V: Field Observation: The challenges of 21st century language teaching in America— Screening: The New Americans: Parts 1 and 2

 

Homework:  Read Chapter 2 in Myths and Realities; Review the 2006 TESOL Content Standards, and prepare for Program Model Roundtable discussion.

 

Institute II:     INCORPORATING STANDARDS IN PROGRAM PLANNING: MANAGING CURRICULAR CONTENT 

 

*      Program Planning: Interview Assignment due

*      Content Coach Response Chart #1:  

 

T Aug 3          Part I: What are Standards?

                        Analyzing the TESOL Standards; Analyzing the Standards Movement

 

Part II: Showcasing Promising Program Models: Elementary School Models 

Program Model 1: Strategies for Creating an Inclusive School Climate: Developing Systematic School Reception/Protocol Models: Chapter 2 Supporting English Language Learners

 & Chapter 2 in   Multilingual Education in Practice

·         Presenter: Jennifer

·          

Program Model 2: Strategies for Developing a Plura-linguistic Reading and writing program for the 21st century: Language Inheritance and maintenance Models at work.

Chapter 3 in Multilingual Education in Practice

·         Presenter: Lauren

 

Program Model 3: Strategies for Developing a Plura-linguistic Reading and writing program for the 21st century: Language Inheritance and maintenance Models at work.

Chapter 4 in Multilingual Education in Practice

·         Presenter: Heather

 

Part II: Field Observation: The challenges of 21st century language teaching in America— Screening: The New Americans: Part 3

 

                        Lunch Break

 

ESOL/ELL: Program Evaluation:

Content Coach: ESOL Coordinator:

Worcester County Public Schools: Ms.  Diana Stultz

 

Planning Time: Standards Discussion (We have limited time so manage your time). Standards Alignment:

Part III: Analyzing TESOL 2006 Standards (Usability/Strengths and weaknesses of the standards)

                        Collaboration of Teams 1, 2 and 3

                       

Part V: Field Observation: The challenges of 21st century language teaching in America— Screening: The New Americans: Part 4                     

 

Homework:  Read Chapter 6 in Myths and Realities

 

 

Institute III:    ANALYZING PROMISING PROGRAM MODELS IN CANADA & THE UNITED STATES: ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSION

 

*      Content Coach Response chart  #2 due

W Aug 5                    

Part 1: Analyzing Action Plans

Looking at some challenges of ELL teaching on the Eastern Shore of Maryland: A study of seven counties

Brainstorming solutions: Rural ELL Teaching; Looking at Resource usage

 

Analyzing one school district’s Action Plan Model and Implementation of School-Based Action Plans   

Introducing Action Research Models and Program Development

 

Part II: Showcasing Promising Program Models: Middle/High School Models 

Program Model 4: Building Bicultural/Biliteracy Models: Models for Leadership in ESOL/ELL Programs

“Calexico High School, Calexico, California— A Focus on School Restructuring.” (pp. 128-153) in Chapter 5 in Access and Engagement

 

 Looking at School-wide Restructuring

“International High School, Long Island City, New York—

A Focus on Instructional Practices and curriculum Integration.” (pp. 154-174) in Chapter 5 in Access and Engagement

·         Presenter: Rebekah

 

Program Model 5: Implementing Programs for LEP Students with Interrupted Schooling

 

“Spring Branch Independent School District, Houston” and “Falls Church Transitional High School, Falls Church Virginia” (pp. 50-61) in Chapter 3 in Through the Golden Door: Educational Approaches for Immigrant Adolescents with Limited Schooling

·         Presenter: Tania

 

Program Model 6:  Comparing two Texan Programs for LEP Students with Interrupted Schooling

 International Newcomer Academy, Forth Worth, Texas” (pp. 73-94) in Chapter 3 in Through the Golden Door: Educational Approaches for Immigrant Adolescents with Limited Schooling

Preventing Alingualism:  Implementing Bilingual Programs for LEP Students with Interrupted Schooling

“Elgin High School Bilingual Program, Elgin Illinois” (pp. 62-72) in Chapter 3 in Through the Golden Door: Educational Approaches for Immigrant Adolescents with Limited Schooling

·         Presenter: Valerie

 

 

            Part III: Field Observation: The challenges of 21st century           

Language teaching in America— Screening: The New Americans: Part 5

 

                                                              Lunch Break

 

ESOL/ELL: Program Evaluation:

Content Coach: ESOL Coordinator:

Somerset County Public Schools: Ms. Lisa Forbush

 

Part IV: Analyzing TESOL 2006 Standards (Usability/Strengths and weaknesses of the standards)

                                    Presentation of Content Team 1  

                                    Presentation of Content Team 2 

                                    Presentation of Content Team 3

 

Part V: Field Observation: The challenges of 21st century language teaching in America— Screening: The New Americans: Part 6

 

 

Homework:  Read Chapter 8 and 9 in Myths and Realities

 

 

 

Institute IV:   PROGRAM MODELS FOR RURAL AREAS: EXAMINING CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES FOR RURAL PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT

 

*      List of Myths and Realities Due

*      Content Coach Response Chart #3: Due 

Th Aug 5                     Showcasing Promising Program Models: Middle/high school Models for Students with Limited Formal Schooling 

 

Program Model 7:  

Initiating and Developing Newcomer Models.

“The Reception Center, Sioux City, Iowa—A Focus on Comprehensive Services” (pp. 110-127) in Chapter 5 in Access and Engagement

·         Presenter: Ron

 

Program Model 8:

Case studies of three well-established newcomer programs:

Ø  Cesar Chavez: Multicultural Academic Center in Chicago

Ø  Liberty High School: New York City

Ø  International Newcomer Academy: Forth Worth, Texas

in Chapter 4 in Creating Access: Language and Academic Programs for Secondary School Newcomers

·         Presenter: Rita

 

Program Model 9: Creating Cultural Democracy in and through Families:  A model for enhancing school Resources in the 21st century

Chapter 5 and 6 in: Supporting English Language Learners

·         Presenter:  Tara

 

 

Part II:  Looking at some challenges of ELL teaching on the Eastern Shore of Maryland: A study of seven counties

Brainstorming solutions: Rural ELL Teaching; Looking at Resource usage

 

 

·         Cohort Reporting Updates.

           

Part III: Field Observation: The challenges of 21st century language teaching in America— Screening: The New Americans: Part 7&8

 

 LUNCH BREAK

 

ESOL/ELL: Program Evaluation:

Content Coach: EFL teacher/ETS test Designer:

Eastern Europe/Latin America: Ms. Deirdre Derrick

 

Part V: Field Observation: The challenges of 21st century language teaching in America— Screening: The New Americans: Part 9.

 

Conclusion: Putting it all together

 

Homework:  Read Chapter 10 in Myths and Realities

 

 

           


 

           

 

Institute V:     CONCLUSION: RURAL PROGRAM PROPOSALS FOR THE 21ST CENTURY

*      Content Coach Response Chart #4: due 

 

 

F Aug 6           Part I: Working on Final project:  

Due in class today

 

 

                        Lunch Break

 

Part II: Being an Informed Professional:  Issues in Advocacy and Knowledge acquisition (Chapter 9 in Managing ESL Programs in Rural and Small Urban Schools). 

 

Part III: Looking Beyond K-12 ESOL/ELL Education Models: Some Final Considerations.

 

Final evaluations

 

Conclusion: Time for Loved ones!!

 

 

Final Project: Outlining a customized ESOL/ELL essay:  Due in class.

 

 


 

Appendix

 

 

Engl.533: ESOL Program Development

Course Designer: Anjali Pandey

 

 

FIELD OBSERVATION: OBSERVING THE LIVES AND LANGUAGE OF NEW AMERICANS:

OUTLINING CUSTOMIZED ELL PROGRAMS

 

Name: ____________________________________________

Date: ____________________________________________

 

 

Instructions: Please watch the documentary: The New Americans which traces the lives of seven separate individuals/newcomer families to the United States over a period of three years. Then, use your notes, as well as the handout which follows to construct four myths and four corresponding realities, (refer to your text: Myths and Realities: Best Practices for Language Minority Students for organizational details if you like), with a  related essay proposal (see details below) You will turn this sheet on Institute 4. (A copy is provided on your syllabus for your records).

 

outlining A CUSTOMIZED esol/ell program: the new AMERICANS FIELD observation

·         Your draft program proposal will be a cumulative project worked on during class meetings and will consist of carefully sequenced screenings of a three-year documentary project tracking the lives of seven immigrant families.

·          Your task will be in two parts:

·         1). identify four myths (general, educational or other stereotypes about newcomer populations) and four concomitant realities of newcomer populations in the United States as identified by this documentary—a handout will be provided (see appendix).

·         2.) Upon the conclusion of the screening, you will focus on writing a brief essay proposal that addresses the schooling/program needs of any one of the newcomers that you identify with in the documentary.  See details below.

·         A detailed worksheet is provided for this task at the end of the syllabus with a brief description of the final essay task provided below. This assignment is due on the final institute. 

 

 

 

 

 

PARTICIPANTS BEING OBSERVED:

For your reference, the table below summarizes the names of the key participants you will be observing and their countries of origin:   

 

NAME

COUNTRY OF ORIGIN/REGION

Israel  Nwidor

Nigeria: Ogoni Region

Ngozi Nwidor

Nigeria: Igbo Region

Barine Wiwa Lawani

Nigeria: Ogoni Region

Nini and Zina Wiwa Lawani(Daughters of Lawani)

Nigeria: Ogoni

Ricardo Rodríguez

Dominican Republic

José García

Dominican Republic

Ramón Martínez

Dominican Republic

Ole and Marie Stimac: Host Family of the Ricardo and José

U.S. A.:Montana

Naima Saddeh

Palestine

Hatem Abudayyeh

American Palestinian

Um Mujahid: Naima’s Mother

Palestine

Jihad Saddeh:Naima’s brother

Palestine

Pedro Flores

Mexico

Ventura Flores

Mexico

Nora Flores (daughter)

Mexico

Anjan Bacchu

India

Harshini Radhakrishnan

India

 

 

 

 

 

Institute Date: ____________________________________

Name:                       _____________________________________

 

 

Myth #1:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reality #1:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Background/Overview: SUMMATIVE Commentary: You could use personal examples from your professional experience to supplement your observations concerning the reality of educational access for newcomer populations to the United States as highlighted by the screening so far.

 

 

 


 

Myth #2:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reality #2:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Background/Overview: SUMMATIVE Commentary: You could use personal examples from your professional experience to supplement your observations concerning the reality of educational access for newcomer populations to the United States as highlighted by the screening so far.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Myth #3:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reality #3:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Background/Overview: SUMMATIVE Commentary: You could use personal examples from your professional experience to supplement your observations concerning the reality of educational access for newcomer populations to the United States as highlighted by the screening so far.

 

 


 

Myth #4:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reality #4:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Background/Overview: SUMMATIVE Commentary: You could use personal examples from your professional experience to supplement your observations concerning the reality of educational access for newcomer populations to the United States as highlighted by the screening so far.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Question: What should an ideal program for language minority students look like?

 

Scenario: “Transformative educators seek to challenge existing notions of schooling rather than blindly reproduce the status quo.  To confront these notions, educators must critique existing practice and envision the alternatives.”  (cf. Short 2000:13)

 

Task: Following the conclusion of the screening of the award-winning documentary: The New Americans, choose one family/individual whose schooling needs are what you are interested in either 1. Planning, 2. Improving or 3. Developing.

 

Organizational Tips:

1.  Briefly outline reasons why this immigrant character appeals to you.

 

2. Clearly outline what programmatic problem/gap you are trying to resolve in your essay as highlighted by the documentary.

 

3. Carefully propose to create novel structures/ procedures or practices for resolving any of the problems you see identified in the documentary concerning the education of this specific language minority student/individual whom you have chosen.

 

4. Systematically specify how your plan/model will be:

 

A. Organized: (Specify the leadership team; the student population to be served; the goals of the program; the program design; the languages of instruction; and the location of the program—in-school/different location— among other aspects)

 

B. Designed/scheduled: Specify the course offerings; resources, daily length of the program, the daily schedule; the curricula standards to be used; materials selection procedures; transportation, and other relevant features of the program.

 

C. Implemented/Staffed: What will the placement/assessment/exit and monitoring strategies; assessment of program effectiveness and student success be like? What will staffing in terms of administrators, paraprofessionals, counselors; translators/interpreters; and parent/community outreach facilities look like?   

(Refer to the assigned chapter on “Establishing an Effective Newcomer Program” for specifics on these details)

 

5. Provide Links to class material or any of the readings presented.

 

6. Provide a detailed conclusion in which you chronicle some of the potential pitfalls to the program you are designing.

 

7.  Your proposal is in the topic of: “An Ideal Language Learning Program for Language Minority students”. However, please provide unique/original titles to your proposals (No page limits).  

 

 

Evaluation Criteria: Your performance will be assessed on:

1. The uniqueness/insightfulness of the myths/realities you identify;

2. Your observations/insight

3. The critical insight embedded in your final essay

4. The organization of your final essay (as well as your ability to synthesize/link   explanations to course content), and

5. The provocativeness/creativity of your proposal concerning English Language Teaching/ program development for any of the characters that you identify with.

 

[1] See the Salisbury University Graduate Catalog for a brief description to this course. (p. 232) 2005-2007 catalog. 

[2] The following standards are taken directly from the document “TESOL/NCATE Standards for the Accreditation of Initial Programs in P-12 ESL Teacher Education”, (2002)-Draft prepared by the TESOL task force on ESL standards” TESOL Inc. Please refer to the following web-site: http://www.ncate.org/standard/new%20program%20standards/tesol.pdf