COURSE DESCRIPTION AND REQUIREMENTS

 

ENGL528-192 ESL Tests & Measurements                                                           Apr 24 – May 22,  2010

TARGET-TESOL (Access Program 2009) / USDE GRANT: T195N070327

Salisbury University

Instructor:  Susan Cooledge, Ph.D.

 

Course materials

Required Texts:

Brown, H. D. (2004) Language Assessment: Principles and Classroom Practices. New York:       Pearson             Education Inc.

Law, B. & Eckes, M. (2007).  Assessment and ESL: An Alternative Approach, 2nd Ed.  Winnipeg,  Manitoba :             Peguis Publishers.

Stoynoff, S. & Chapelle, C. (2005).  ESOL Tests and Testing. Alexandria, VA: TESOL, Inc.

 

Supplemental readings will be distributed in class, and online resources will also be incorporated into the course content and requirements.

 

A list of references/resources appears at the end of this syllabus.

 

Course Overview:  The ENGL528 course is designed to provide students a fundamental understanding of assessment concepts and practices, with a particular emphasis on ESL.  The following standards for Domain 4 of the TESOL/NCATE Standards provide the foundation for the development of the course objectives. 

 

TESOL/NCATE STANDARDS  (http://www.ncate.org/ProgramStandards/TESOL/TesolStd.pdf)

(Domain 4 – pp 34-42)

Domain 4: Assessment

Candidates understand issues of assessment and use standards-based assessment measures with ESOL students.

Standard 4.a. Issues of Assessment for ESL. Candidates understand various issues of

assessment (e.g., cultural and linguistic bias; political, social, and psychological factors) in

assessment, IQ, and special education testing (including gifted and talented); the importance of standards; and the difference between language proficiency and other types of assessment (e.g., standardized achievement tests of overall mastery), as they affect ESOL student learning.

Standard 4.b. Language Proficiency Assessment. Candidates know and use a variety of

standards-based language proficiency instruments to inform their instruction and understand their uses for identification, placement, and demonstration of language growth of ESOL students.

Standard 4.c. Classroom-Based Assessment for ESL. Candidates know and use a variety of performance-based assessment tools and techniques to inform instruction.

 

Course objectives:

By the end of this course, students should be able to

- understand and articulate fundamental concepts and principles of tests and measurement as well as strategies for alternative/performance assessment

- examine current trends and problems in language testing and evaluate the role of testing and assessment in a given curriculum

- analyze tests, interpret results, and utilize results to improve the quality of tests

- construct a standards-based assessment measure

- evaluate a variety of assessment approaches appropriate for ESL learners

- read critically research in language testing

 

Attendance Policy:  Please plan to attend each Saturday institute.   Since class participation is an integral part of the work of this course, absences will adversely affect your class preparation and participation grade (see below).  The circumstances of “emergencies situations” that may prevent you from fully attending the class should be conveyed to me as promptly as possible.

 

Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) Statement:  All written assignments for this course are in support of Salisbury University’s Writing Across the Curriculum Program.

 

Academic Dishonesty/Plagiarism Policy:  The English Department takes plagiarism, the unacknowledged use of other people’s ideas, very seriously.  As outlined in the Student Handbook under the “Policy on Student Academic Integrity,” plagiarism may receive such penalties as failure on a paper or failure in the course.  The English Department recognizes that plagiarism is a very serious offense and professors make their decisions regarding sanctions accordingly.  Each of the following constitutes plagiarism:

 

1.  Turning in as your own work a paper or part of a paper that anyone other than you wrote.  This would include but is not limited to work taken from another student, from a published author, or from an Internet contributor.

2.  Turning in a paper/assignment that includes unquoted and/or undocumented passages someone else wrote.

3.  Including in a paper someone else’s original ideas, opinions or research results without attribution.

4.  Paraphrasing without attribution.

A few changes in wording do not make a passage your property.  As a precaution, if you are in doubt, cite the source.  Moreover, if you have gone to the trouble to investigate secondary sources, you should give yourself credit for having done so by citing those sources in your essay and by providing a list of Works Cited or Works Consulted at the conclusion of the essay.  In any case, failure to provide proper attribution could result in a severe penalty and is never worth the risk.

 

Special Needs:  Any students with disabilities or other special needs, who require special accommodations and adjustments in this course, should share these concerns with the instructor as soon as possible.

 

Cell Phone Policy:  Cell phones are to be turned off or muted during class time, and stored out of view.

 

Grading scheme for overall course grade (SU Graduate scheme):  Students performance in this class will be assessed expectations of graduate school.

 

90-100%         A

85-89%           B+

80-84%           B

75-79%           C+

65-69%           D

0-64%             F


 

 

 

FOR STUDENTS SEEKING CERTIFICATION IN ESOL/TESOL: NCATE STANDARDS[1]

Please refer to Domain 4 in the document:

http://www.coas.uncc.edu/linguistics/Internal%20documents/NCATEP12Standards.pdf

Or

http://www.ncate.org/standard/new%20program%20standards/tesol.pdf

Standards 4a, 4b and 4c: Assessment: “Candidates understand issues of assessment and use standards-based assessment measures with ESOL students.” 

Also please refer to the Rubric for Standard 4a-c, which is very relevant for this course at the following web site:

http://www.coas.uncc.edu/linguistics/Internal%20documents/NCATEP12Standards.pdf

Or

http://www.ncate.org/standard/new%20program%20standards/tesol.pdf

Another extremely useful site is:

http://www.cal.org/ericcll/teachers/teachers.pdf

 

MSDE/NCATE Technology Requirements: All students seeking TESOL certification in this class must establish an electronic portfolio, and include at least one project/paper from this course in this portfolio.  Detailed hypermedia presentations done for this course can be included in this electronic portfolio. Your reflective portfolio essay gives more details.   When including your portfolio selection, be sure to include:

  1. A brief narrative argument explaining why the content of the selection will be integrated into your classroom pedagogy—why is it of importance.
  2. The extent to which the selected material meets the outlined course objectives—show its connection to the actual course.
  3. A brief synthesis of the extent to which you feel that your selection meets a specific standard in the above cited NCATE/TESOL standards, and your evaluation of whether it:

a) Approaches the specific Standard

b) Meets the specific Standard

c) Exceeds the specific standard

For further details on electronic portfolios, please consult the following web page: http://trc.salisbury.edu/portfolio/Portfolio.htm

 

NCATE Requirements:

 


 

Course requirements

 

Preparation & Participation (10%):  Your preparation and participation will be evaluated and assessed  weekly in consideration of your knowledge, understanding and application of the assigned readings, as evidenced in your informed and insightful contributions to class and small group discussions, as well as your completion of in-class assignments. You will be asked to complete a few assignments related to the readings as homework/preparation as well.

 

In-class formal assessments (15%): Each week we will begin the first 30 minutes of class with a formal assessment of the assigned readings or website(s) constructed by two class members.  If the formal assessment requires preparation of a specific nature, please provide your classmates with useful information, such as a study guide or the format your assessment will take (via email or in class).  The test administrators will also be responsible for grading the formal assessments, which must ultimately result in a numerical grade, consistent with the SU grading scheme indicated on page 2 of this syllabus.  The test administrators will submit the following materials at the next class meeting:  1) all assessment materials, 2) the grading criteria and grading procedures, and 3) a 1-2 page rationale for the instrument development and a post-administration evaluation/discussion of its effectiveness in achieving the assessment objective(s). Refer to practicality, rater reliability, test reliability, content validity, face validity, washback, and so forth in your evaluation and discussion (Brown 2004). Grade: 10% average score of your performance on graded formal assessments and 5% for assessment, 1-2 page paper with an explanation/justification of the assessment tool, and a critical evaluation/discussion of the administration, grading and effectiveness of your formal assessment.

 

Statement of Assessment Philosophy (5%):  Students will write a 2-3 page statement of their personal views/beliefs on the topic of assessment, including how your assessment views/practices reflect and/or are reflected in your teaching philosophy/beliefs.  Students will be asked to reconsider and revise their statements at the end of the course, and to provide a concluding statement about professional development gains realized through this course.

 

ESOL Assessment Instrument (10%):  Student must create an ESOL assessment instrument with a clear connection to ESL P-12 Standards.  The instrument must be accompanied by a written report, in which you discuss objective(s), theoretical underpinning(s), test specifications, (intended audience, intended context for its administration, grading criteria, rater(s), scoring procedures, and so forth), as well as issues of practicality, rater reliability, test reliability, content validity, face validity, and washback (Brown, 2004).

 

Reaction Papers: Content Coaches (10%):  Students will submit reactions papers for the three content coach presentations.  Each page paper must contain a 1) summary, 2) critical commentary/evaluation of the material and/or presentation, and 3) expansion/application of the content, with reference to course readings and other relevant resources. Papers should be scholarly and professional, and not exceed 3 pages.  A list of references, works cited or consulted (format APA style) required.

 

Research:  Literature Review (20%):  Students will select an ESL test and measurement issue to research - the more narrow the research scope, the better, given the time constraints for this course.  A research question must be developed, then an argumentative position/thesis must be posited and supported at the onset of the paper (introduction), as a result of your critical review of relevant scholarly research.  Students are expected to summarize, synthesize and evaluate critically 6-8 scholarly published articles (or chapters).  Each must be summarized in one page or less, followed by a 3-4 synthesis and critical analysis of the research findings, and finally a 2-3 page discussion and conclusion, with consideration for future research directions/questions on this topic. A list of references, works cited or consulted (format APA style) required.  A description of the research issue, a research question, and a preliminary list of six references must be submitted by May 8st.

 

 

 

 

Field Project (20%)  Students must choose one (1) of the two projects below to complete.

 

A.  ESOL students in the Eastern Shore Public Schools

Investigate the policies, procedures of ESOL student identification, testing, placement, and exit strategies within a school or school district.  This project entails interviewing responsible school personnel (e.g. ESOL Specialist or Administrator), and collecting related artifacts, such as  written statements of school protocol, reports prepared, and any other ESOL placement documents.  You are required to develop a list of interview prompts and questions and attach it to the report as an appendix.

 

The written report should include the following, and be grounded in assessment principles and supported with reference to course readings:

- an introduction, including a description of the school setting and ESOL population

- a detailed description of the policies, procedures and testing tools pertaining to the method of ESOL student identification, the process and method of evaluation for placement in the school, (including test administration and scoring), the re-evaluation and exit strategies

- a description and discussion of artifacts collected

- an analysis and evaluation of any assessment instruments used by the school, grounded in a critical discussion of the five principles of practicality, reliability, validity, authenticity and washback (Brown, 2004)

- a discussion on perceived success of ESOL policies and procedures, as revealed through the interview(s)

- a summary in which you recall the main findings, identify what might be considered ‘weaknesses’ or problems in current policies and practices,  and make informed suggestions for change

- list of references, works cited or consulted (format APA style), and appendices

 

B.  ESOL students in the classroom

Investigate the assessment policies and practices of a content teacher with ESOL students in your school or school district.  You must first identify a teacher who instructs ESOL classes or a teacher who has ESOL students in his/her class(es).  This project requires an interview, at least one classroom observation involving ESOL student assessment (formal or informal), and the collection of artifacts relevant to your field experience, including at least one assessment instrument used by the teacher.  You are required to develop a list of interview prompts and questions and attach it to the report as an appendix.  For information on ESL student accommodations in Maryland Public Schools, consult the site (http://marylandpublicschools.org/MSDE/) and access “Testing” on the menu bar, then Sections 7, 8  9.

 

The written report should include the following and be grounded in and supported by assessment principles and related literature:

- a description of the 1) teacher, 2) setting, 3) ESOL students, and 4) teacher’s assessment policies and practices regarding ESOL students

- a description and evaluation of the observation(s)

- a description and discussion of any artifacts provided by the teacher

- an analysis and evaluation of teacher-provided assessment instrument(s), grounded in a critical discussion of the five principles of practicality, reliability, validity, authenticity and washback (Brown, 2004: pp30-38)

- a conclusion in which you summarize and reflect on practical application(s) of this experience to your teaching and/or to the ESOL student population at large on the Eastern Shore

- list of references, works cited or consulted (format APA style), and appendices

 

Presentations (10%):  Students are required to make a 10-15 minute presentation to the class of their main findings from this field research project and research paper.   The presentations should be scholarly and professional, and include PowerPoint slides with main points and findings.

 

 

 

 

 

ENGL528-192 Course outline

 

Institute #1 - April 24th

Topic: Introduction to Assessment Principles and Classroom Test Design

 

Reading & Assignments:

1) Brown Ch 1, 2 & 3

2) Assessment philosophy/views statement:  2-3 page statement of your personal views/beliefs on the topic of assessment, including how your assessment views/practices reflect and/or are reflected in your teaching philosophy/beliefs.

3) Formal assessment: Brown (2004) Ch 1, 2, 3 terms

 

 

 

 

Institute #2 – May 1st

Topics:           

Standards-Based Assessment

Assessing Listening, Speaking, Reading & Writing

 

Reading & Assignments:

1) Brown Ch5-9; Law & Eckes Ch10

2) Examine TESOL ESL Standards for Pre-K-12 Students (http://www.tesol.org/s_tesol/seccss.asp?CID=113&DID=1583).

3) Examine the No Child Left Behind Act website (http://www.ed.gov/nclb/landing.jhtml)

4) Formal Assessment: Eric & Jennifer

 

Guest Speaker Ms. Cantessa Cain - Talbot County Public Schools

 

 

 

 


 

Institute #3  - May 8th

Topics:

Standardized Testing

TESOL ESL Standards for Pre-K-12 Students

 

Reading & Assignments:

1) Brown (2004) Ch4; ESOL Tests & Testing (2005) Ch1 – 5 (skim Ch2 samples)

2) Review the Educational Testing Service website (http://www.ets.org)

3) To be submitted: 1st Content Coach paper and Research description & references

4) Formal assessment: Valerie & Ron

 

Guest Speaker: Ms. Deidre Derrick – ETS

 

 


 

 

 

Institute #4 – May 15th

Topic:

Alternative Assessments

 

Reading & Assignments:

1) Brown Ch10,  Law & Eckes (2007) Ch1-7

2) To be submitted:  2nd Content Coach paper & ESOL Assessment Instrument (informal presentation)

3) Formal assessment: Amy & Dana

 

Student Presentations:  Field Projects

 

Guest Speaker:  Ms. Diane Stultz – Worcester County Schools

 

 

 

 


 

Institute #5  - May 22rd

Topics:           

Grading

Learner-directed /self-assessment

Collaboration

 

Reading and Assignments:

1) Brown Ch 11; Eckes & Law Ch 8-11; Ch 14 (Bailey, 1998 – will be provided)

2) To be submitted: 3rd Content Coach paper & Field Project Report due

à Research paper may be submitted today or on Sat, May 29th.

3) Formal assessment: Mar & Lauren

 

Student Presentations Research findings

 

DUE SAT, MAY 29th:  Revised statement of assessment views/philosophy; Research paper

 

* PORTFOLIO:  All students seeking TESOL certification in this class must establish an electronic portfolio, and include at least one project/paper from this course in this portfolio.  See page 3 of this syllabus for instructions on submitting this requirement.  Please submit this item by May 29th.

 

 

Syllabus subject to changes as deemed necessary and appropriate by the instructor.  Students will be made immediately aware of these changes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Many thanks to Dr. A. Pandey for her valuable input and contributions to the development of this syllabus.


 

GRADING

Instructor’s grading scheme

A = 95% meets and often exceeds stated expectations

A - = 90% meets and sometimes exceeds stated expectations

B = 85% meets stated expectations

B- = 80% approaches stated expectations

C = 75% marginally meets stated expectations

D = 65% unacceptable

0 = absent

 

I.  Preparation & participation (10%)

You will be assessed on the basis of the following general statement, using the system indicated above.  The weekly scores will be averaged to calculate a course grade.

 

             Expectations:  Student demonstrates an appreciable understanding and application of course materials by expanding and initiating class and partner discussion in a critically-grounded, scholarly, thought-provoking and innovative manner.  Student completes in-class and homework assignments as directed.

 

II.  Content Coach papers

_______ summary

_______critical commentary/evaluation of the material and/or presentation

_______expansion/application of the content, with reference to course readings and other relevant resources

_______error-free, well-organized, innovative,  scholarly writing exemplified + references (APA style)

 

III.  ESOL Assessment Instrument

 ­­­______ assessment instrument with a clear connection to ESL P-12 Standards
______  written report/description content - objective(s) theoretical underpinning(s)intended audience, intended context for its administration, grading criteria, rater(s), scoring procedures)

 ______written report/evaluation content - practicality, rater reliability, test reliability, content validity, face validity, and washback (Brown, 2004)

______ error-free, well-organized, innovative,  scholarly writing exemplified + references (APA style)

 

IV. Presentations

ESOL Field Project

             objective, context of project, and main findings presented

______ integration of course content exemplified

             judicious and effective use of 10-15 minute time constraint

             visual(s): PP slides (10 max)

 

Research

             research issue, thesis, and main findings presented

______ integration of course content exemplified

             judicious and effective use of 10-15 minute time constraint

             visual(s): PP slides (10 max)

 

V. Statement of Assessment Philosophy

          _ articulated statement

______ revision / including professional development gains

______ demonstration/explanation of gains/growth

______ error-free, well-organized, innovative,  scholarly writing exemplified

 

 

 

VI.  Rubric for ESOL Field Project and Research Paper

Qualities & Criteria

Poor (1-2)

Good (3-4)

Excellent (5)

Introduction

Title; Objective or Thesis; Problem statement; Orientation to reader; Topic.

weight: 5% of paper grade

score (1, 2, 3, 4, or 5)
x 1 =

a. There is no reference to the topic, problem, or audience.

b. There is no statement of thesis or objective of the research.

c. The title is inappropriate and does not describe the topic.

a. The writer makes the reader aware of the overall problem, challenge, or topic to be examined.

b. Thesis is stated but clarity and/or focus could be better.

c. The title does not adequately describe the topic.

a. The writer introduces the topic and its relevance to (1) the discipline; and (2) the chosen audience. The introduction lays groundwork for the direction of the paper.

b. Thesis or objective is clearly stated and appropriately focused.

c. Main idea stands along with details.

d. The title is appropriate and adequately describes the topic.

Body

Structure; Flow; Organization and Development

weight: 20% of paper grade

score (1, 2, 3, 4, or 5)
x 4 =

a. The paper has little to no direction, with disjointed subtopics.

b. Text is repetitious.

c. Information seems to be disorganized and has little to do with the main topic.

d. Lacks a thesis or controlling idea.

e. Sentences do not relate to the paragraph’s main idea.

f. Paragraphs do not clearly or effectively relate to the paper’s thesis or controlling idea.

g. Examples are either lacking or ineffective (i.e., do not relate to the main idea in the paper or paragraph)

a. There is a basic flow from one section to the next, but not all sections or paragraphs follow in a natural or logical order.

b. Ideas are clear, but there is a lack of extra information.

c. Information relates to main topic. Details and amount of information are sparse.

d. Includes a basic thesis or controlling idea.

e. Sentences mostly relate to the paragraph’s main idea.

f. Paragraphs generally though not always relate to the thesis or controlling idea.

g. Examples are included, though not always; reader needs specific details or quotes that the writer does not provide.

a. The paper flows from general ideas to specific conclusions and/or vice-versa. All sections follow a logical order. Transitions tie together sections as well as individual paragraphs.

b. Ideas are clear, original, and focused. Main idea stands along with details.

c. Sufficient information included. Information clearly relates to the main relates to the main thesis. It includes several supporting details and/or examples.

d. Provides a clear and compelling thesis.

e. Sentences clearly relate to the paragraph’s main idea .

f. Paragraphs clearly and effectively relate to and support the thesis.

g. Writer provides examples and quotes that answer the reader’s questions and add depth to the writer’s ideas.

Content

Weaving together literature through synthesis via thematic categories that provide exploration/explanation

weight: 35% of paper grade

score (1, 2, 3, 4, or 5)
x 7 =

a. The writer has omitted major sections of pertinent content or content runs on excessively.

b. The writer quotes other material excessively.

c. The ideas presented have little significance to the discipline and/or the audience.

d. Text is repetitious.

e. There is no central theme.

f. Ideas in the paper are irrelevant or not worthy of the reader’s consideration.

a. The writer includes all the sections of pertinent content, but does not cover them in as much depth or detail as the audience/reader expects.

b. The significance to the discipline is evident.

c. Ideas are clear, but more information is needed.

d. Ideas in the paper are mostly (but not all) relevant and worthy of the reader’s consideration.

a. The writer covers the appropriate content in depth without being redundant.

b. The writer cites sources when specific statements are made.

c. The significance of quotes, when used, is apparent.

d. The length is appropriate.

e. Ideas are clear, original, and focused. Main idea stands out, along with details.

f. Ideas in the paper are compelling, even original; they are not self-evident.

Clarity and Correctness of the Writing

weight: 15% of paper grade

score (1, 2, 3, 4, or 5)
x 3 =

a. It is difficult for the reader to understand what the writer is trying to express.

b. Writing is convoluted.

c. Paper contains spelling and grammatical errors as well as improper punctuation.

d. The writing is vague or it is difficult to understand what the writer is trying to express.

e. Mistakes in grammar, spelling, and/or punctuation cause confusion and show lack of concern for quality of writing.

f. Writing rambles; the paper appears hastily written.

a. The writing is generally clear, but unnecessary words are occasionally used. Meaning is sometimes hidden.

b. Paragraph or sentence structure is repetitive.

c. Much of the writing is generally clear, but meaning is sometimes hidden.

d. Some mistakes in grammar, spelling, and/or punctuation exist, but they do not cause confusion; they suggest negligence, not indifference.

e. Writing might ramble; the paper is not carefully written.

a. The writing is clear and concise.

b. There are no (or very few) mistakes in grammar, spelling, and/or punctuation.

c. The writing does not ramble; the paper is carefully written and edited.

Conclusions

Synthesis of ideas and culminating in a research question, or suggestions for further research, or finalizing with a clear position.

weight: 10% of paper grade

score (1, 2, 3, 4, or 5)
x 2 =

a. There is little or no indication that the writer tried to synthesize the information or draw conclusions based on the literature under review.

b. No research question(s) or suggestions are offered to the reader, or the position is not restated and made clear to the reader as a conclusion.

a. The writer provides concluding remarks that show an analysis and synthesis of ideas and information. Some of the conclusions, however, are not supported in the body of the review.

b. A follow-up research question or suggestion is offered to the reader, or the writer’s position is restated to make it clear to the reader.

a. The writer makes succinct and precise conclusions based on the review of literature.

b. Insights into the problem/topic are appropriate.

c. Conclusions are strongly supported within the paper.

Sources & Citations & Proper APA Format

weight:15% of paper grade

score (1, 2, 3, 4, or 5)
x 3 =

a. The writer does not include in-text citations for statements made in the review.

b. References that are included in the References or Works Cited list are not cited in the text.

c. An insufficient number of sources are cited and/or not accurately documented.

d. The paper is not written in APA style.

e. A review of literature has been omitted.

f. No attention is given to people-first, non-discriminatory language.

g. Scholarly sources are not cited in text and reference list.

h. Sources are primarily from the popular press and/or the paper consists primarily of personal opinions.

a. The writer cites sources within the body of the review and includes a corresponding References list.  Some formatting problems exist or some elements are missing.

b. An acceptable number of sources is cited. All sources are accurately documented, but some are not in the desired format.

c. Paper is in APA style but with some errors.

d. The body of the paper consists of a review of the literature.

e. There is evidence of attention to people-first, non-discriminatory language.

f. Most sources are scholarly and cited, but with some errors.

g. Personal opinions are kept to a minimum though may not be delayed in the paper.

a. The writer includes all necessary citations in the body of the review.

b. The references in the list match the in-text citations and all are properly cited in APA style.

c. Numerous sources are cited. All sources are accurately documented.

d. Accurately adheres to APA style in formatting, organization, and construction, including full review of relevant literature.

e. There is consistent use of people-first, non-discriminatory language.

f. The majority of sources are scholarly and cited correctly in both text and reference list.

g. Personal opinions are delayed and stated succinctly in the conclusion.

Total Score =

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

[source: http://deoracle.org/learning-objects/sample-rubric-for-grading-a-term-paper.html]


 

ENGL528-192 ESL Tests & Measurements

TARGET-TESOL (Access Program 2009) / USDE GRANT: T195N070327

 

References and Resources

 

APA formatting @ http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/01/

 

Bachman, L. F. (1990).  Fundamental Considerations in Language Testing.  Oxford University Press.

 

Bachman, L., & Cohen, A. (1998).  Interfaces Between Second Language Acquisition and Language Testing Research.  Cambridge University Press.

 

Bailey, K. & Bailey, M. (1998).  Learning About Language Assessment:  Dilemmas, Decisions, and          Directions.  Boston, MA: Heinle & Heinle.

 

Brown, H. D. (2004) Language Assessment: Principles and Classroom Practices. New York:       Pearson Education Inc.

 

Center for Applied Linguistics www.cal.org

à Resources for ESL assessment @ http://www.cal.org/resources/archive/rgos/eslassess.html

 

Coombe, C. Hubley, N. (Eds.) (2003). Assessment Practices. Alexandria: TESOL

 

Cheng, L, Watanabe, Y.  & Curtis, A. (Eds). (2004). Washback in Language Testing: Research Contexts and Methods.   Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates Publishers.

 

Educational Testing Service @  http://www.ets.org

 

Ekbatani G. & Pierson, H. (Eds). (2000). Learner-Directed Assessment in ESL.   Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates Publishers.

 

Johnson, Donna M. (1992). Approaches to Research in Second Language Acquisition.  White Plains, NY:              Longman.

 

Journal of Technology, Learning and Assessment @ [http://escholarship.bc.edu/jtla/ JTLA is a peer-reviewed, scholarly on-line journal addressing the intersection of computer-based technology, learning, and assessment.

 

Language Assessment Quarterly: International Journal (LAQ) is dedicated to the advancement of theory, research, and practice in first, second, and foreign language assessment for school.

 

Language Testing Resource @  http://languagetesting.info/

Law, B. & Eckes, M. (1998).  Assessment and ESL: A Handbook for K-12 Teachers.  Winnipeg, Manitoba:

            Peguis Publishers.

 

Law, B. & Eckes, M. (2007).  Assessment and ESL : An Alternative Approach 2nd Ed..  Winnipeg,

            Manitoba : Peguis Publishers.

 

Nicenet class site @ nicenet.org

 

O’Malley, M. J. & Valdez Pierce, L. (1998). Authentic Assessment for English Language Learners:           Practical Approaches for Teachers. White Plains, NY: Addison Wesley Longman Inc.

 

Practical Assessment, Research & Evaluation @ http://pareonline.net/   PARE is an on-line journal supported entirely by volunteer efforts. Its purpose is to provide access to refereed articles that can have a positive impact on assessment, research, evaluation, and teaching practice.

 

Purpura, J. E. (2004).  Assessing Grammar.  Cambridge University Press.

 

Silva, T. & Matsuda, P.K. (Eds.). (2001).  Landmark Essays on ESL Writing.  Hermagoras Press/ Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Publishers.

 

Silva, T. & Matsuda, P.K. (Eds.). (2001).  On Second Language Writing.  Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Publishers.

 

Stoynoff, S. & Chapelle, C. A. (2005).  ESOL Tests and Testing. Alexandria, VA: TESOL, Inc.

 

Strickland, K. &  Strickland, J. (2000). Making Assessment Elementary.   Portsmouth, New           Hampshire: Heinemann.

 

Suskie, L. (2004).  Assessing Student Learning: a common sense guide.  Bolton, MA:  Anker Publishing   Company, Inc.

 

Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages, Inc. (2001). Scenarios for ESL Standards- Based Assessment. Alexandria, VA: TESOL, Inc.

 

TESOL @ http://www.tesol.org/s_tesol/index.asp

 

TESOL/NCATE Standards @ http://www.ncate.org/ProgramStandards/TESOL/TesolStd.pdf

 

TESOL ESL Standards for Pre-K-12 Students@ http://www.tesol.org/s_tesol/seccss.asp?CID=113&DID=1583

 

The No Child Left Behind Act @ http://www.ed.gov/nclb/landing.jhtml


 

[1] The following standards are taken directly from the document “TESOL/NCATE Standards for the Accreditation of Initial programs in P-12 ESL Teacher Education”, (2002)-Draft prepared by the TESOL task force on ESL standards” TESOL Inc. Please refer to the following web-site: http://www.ncate.org/standard/new%20program%20standards/tesol.pdf

 

[Note:  Certification information created by Dr. A. Pandey and included in this syllabus with author’s permission.]