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SUSRC 2015

13th Annual Salisbury University
Student Research Conference

Friday, April 25, 2014

SUSRC 2014
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11:30am-1:30 p.m.
Registration & Welcome Reception:
Welcome from Provost Diane Allen, Performance by Squawkapella, Perdue Hall Atrium

1:30-2:45 p.m.
Session 1:
Oral Research Presentations Henson Hall

3:00-4:15 p.m.
Session 2:
Oral Research Presentations Henson Hall

4:30-5:45 p.m.
Session 3:

Oral Research Presentations Henson Hall

6:00-7:30 p.m.
Poster Session:

Refreshments Wicomico Room, Guerrieri Center

The Registration & Information table will be open:

  • 11:30am - 1:30pm Perdue Hall Atrium
  • 1:30pm – 4:30pm Henson Hall Lobby
  • 5:00 pm - 6:00pm Guerrieri Center, Wicomico Room entrance

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  • Title: Genetic Variation and Female Mate Choice in Tungara Frog (Physalaemus pustulosus)
    Student: Laurie Adler
    Faculty mentor: Kimberly Hunter
    Type: Oral Presentation
    Time: 4:30-4:45
    Session: 3E Identification
    Location: HS 211 HS211

    In the tngara frog (Physalaemus pustulosus), males vocalize to attract a mate and females show strong mating preferences for particular male vocalizations. Specifically, males produce a two note call. The first note is a whine and the second note is a chuck. Males always produce a whine and can voluntarily add one or more chucks to the end of the call. The addition of a chuck makes the whine approximately five times more attractive to females. Along with this acoustic stimulus, male frogs inflate a vocal sac in their throat as a visual stimulus, creating a complex multisensory signal (visual + acoustic). Here we address what little is understood about how the female frog assess the different signal components. Specifically, we tested how females weigh visual versus acoustic signal components by using behavioral mate choice experiments. Results reveal that females do assess both stimuli. Interestingly, female responses to these stimuli occur in a non-linear fashion. In some cases, the visual signal increases the attractiveness of the acoustic signal, but in other cases it does not. The importance of each signal component seems to depend on the particular combination of visual and acoustic stimuli that females experience. Although these results provide insights into how females drive the evolution of male traits, it is still unclear what the underlying basis is for female mate choice. One possibility is that females are selecting mates based on geneotypes, therefore choosing males that are either genetically similar or dissimilar to themselves. To address this question, we are examining fine-scale population genetic structure of captured females and the males they chose in nature.
  • Title: More Alive than Dead: Buried Wives in Lady Audley's Secret, Howards End, and Rebecca
    Student: Alysha Allen
    Faculty mentor: Lucy Morrison
    Type: Oral Presentation
    Time: 5:10-5:25
    Session: 3C Freedom
    Location: HS 111 HS111

    Dead women dont stay buried long under the pages of late Victorian to early 20th century British literature. Women in the late Victorian era who shrugged the domestic ideal, otherwise known as New Women, were diagnosed as morally diseased and inspected under that pretext in order to repress their masculine behavior. These corrupted women surfaced in British literature from the late 19th to the early 20th century as a force that plagued domestic womanhood. In Lady Audleys Secret, Howards End, and Rebecca, dead wives haunt the bodies of their living female successors. These dead wives sought to eradicate any dominance the non-diseased, domestic ideal of womanhood had over their bodies through the literal possession of the living, female body that housed these ideals. In Mary Elizabeth Braddons Lady Audleys Secret, Lady Audley gains control over Audley Court when her previously buried identities haunt and guide her deceptively innocuous schemes under the guise of a complaisant wife. Her diseased body is removed from the domestic space once discovered and imprisoned in a medical institution for investigation before it can be infected any further by her dominion. However, in E.M. Forsters Howards End, the traditional woman finds a mediation with modern womanhood when the ghost of Mrs. Wilcox merges with Margaret Schlegels progressively masculine traits. The contention between traditional and modern womanhood culminates in Daphne Du Mauriers Rebecca when the dead wife at Manderley haunts and attempts to possessively control the new wife of Maxim de Winter. Rebeccas ultimate destruction of Manderley at the conclusion of the novel indicates her indomitable reign over docile and domestic womanhood. Domestic womanhood had also been modern womens most pestilential phantom until the syncretistic possession of each others spectral body ultimately led to the buried wifes resurrection as the angel and devil of the house.
  • Title: The Election of 1824 and the Alleged Corrupt Bargain
    Student: Christopher Anderson
    Faculty mentor: Jeanne Whitney
    Type: Oral Presentation
    Time:
    Session: 2B Politics
    Location: HS 109 HS109

    This paper examines the United States Presidential election of 1824 between John Quincy Adams, Henry Clay, William Crawford, and Andrew Jackson and the alleged corrupt bargain between Henry Clay and John Quincy Adams. It is a popular belief that Henry Clay offered John Quincy Adams his influence in Congress to help Adams obtain the presidency in return for the office of Secretary of State. By examining correspondents between politicians, news articles suggesting the mood of public opinion, and current literature on the developments of the election, I was able to investigate alternative motives for the claim of a corrupt bargain against Adams and Clay. A closer look into this issue shows that these accusations were unfounded and mainly a result of mudslinging from a disappointed Jackson affiliate in order to try to sway public opinion and tarnish the reputations of those implicated. The vote made within the House of Representatives can be explained by relationships between the political figures and preferences rather than a corrupt bargain.
  • Title: One wants to be emotional, both want to problem solve: Gender, coping style, and perceived stress during a cognitive stress task.
    Student: Lauren Anderson
    Faculty mentor: Karl Maier
    Type: Oral Presentation
    Time: 1:50-2:05
    Session: 1C Perceptions
    Location: HS 111 HS111

    Active and emotion-focused coping consist of coping strategies that are used to lessen the perceived stress brought on by a particular situation in ones life. Active coping is concerned with actively working to change a situation (Carver, Scheier & Weintraub, 1989). However, emotion-focused coping is used to decrease the negative emotional effects a situation may cause and tends to be used when one feels that a situation is beyond their control (Lowe & Bennett, 2003, p.394). Previous research on the existence of gender differences for active and emotion-focused coping styles has been inconclusive. In this study, participants completed the same cognitive stress task (Stroop color-word interference task) to measure their overall perceived stress. We also compared men and women on their self-reported coping styles. We hypothesized that women would report using greater emotion-focused coping strategies than men, and men would report using more active coping strategies than women. We also hypothesized that women would experience greater overall perceived stress than men due to the gender-typed cognitive stress task used. The sample of the study included college students (n = 85; M= 21.22 years (SD = .859); 78.8% women, 22% males, 75.7% white. Participants completed the Stress Appraisal Measure (SAM; Peacock & Wong, 1990) to evaluate their overall perceived stress and then completed the Brief COPE (Carver, Scheier & Weintraub, 1989) to measure their active and emotion-focused coping tendencies. Although there was no statistically significant gender difference in overall perceived stress during the stress task, women showed a trend toward reporting higher levels of perceived stress. Also, while there was no statistically significant gender difference for problem-focused coping, women did report greater emotion-focused coping than men, p .05. The results of this study suggest that women use more emotion-focused coping strategies and both men and women use problem-focused strategies.
  • Title: Heating up of Honeybees (Apis mellifera): is there a critical stage in order to detect respiration in the mitochondria of flight muscles?
    Student: Ann Ascot
    Faculty mentor: Stephen Gehnrich
    Type: Oral Presentation
    Time: 5:10-5:25
    Session: 3E Identification
    Location: HS 211 HS211

    Honeybees (Apis mellifera) are known to display high aerobic metabolic rates during flight, and several studies have addressed biochemical questions concerning the metabolic fuel and mode of respiration during flight. These studies have identified carbohydrate oxidation as the sole source of energy during flight. Several studies have also shown that the muscle temperature needs to be raised above a critical temperature to acquire flight capability; below this temperature the metabolic activity is very low. The heat needed to warm the muscle can be obtained from the environment, or from metabolism. We plan to investigate the thermal transition of bee muscle metabolism by studying differences in mitochondrial respiration between cold and warm bees, and the possible role of mitochondrial pyruvate transport in providing the necessary metabolic substrates for metabolism. We hypothesize that pyruvate transport from the cytoplasm into the mitochondria, and its conversion to Krebs cycle intermediates such as oxaloacetate (OAA), thereby priming the Krebs cycle, is a possible mechanism for the activation of metabolism prior to flight in cold bees. Mitochondria will be isolated from the flight muscles of cold and warm bees, and their rates of oxygen consumption measured in vitro after the addition of ADP, using pyruvate or succinate as substrates. Bee flight muscle will be analyzed for the expression of the mitochondrial pyruvate carrier (MPC) using RT-PCR with primers based on the cDNA sequence of the MPC from Drosophila.
  • Title: For All That: The Value of the Common in Robert Burns Poetry
    Student: Asha Azariah-Kribbs
    Faculty mentor: Lucy Morrison
    Type: Oral Presentation
    Time: 4:30-4:45
    Session: 3B Meaning
    Location: HS 109 HS109

    Robert Burns was not always recognized as one of Scotlands finest poets. Although earlier authors of the Romantic period had softened the educated elite to the idea of the simple virtue of the lower classes, Burns took this notion a step further. British intellectuals of the eighteenth century scorned what they regarded as substandard English being elevated to, indeed celebrated as, artistic expression. Burns was not an uneducated man despite his humble origins yet he chose to rhyme in dialect that could only be understood by Scotlands poor, the phonetically supplied accent being entirely incomprehensible to the refined English ear. His glosses, explicating the particular colloquialisms or highlighting traditions of Scotlands laborers, drove home to uninitiated readers of the vernacular a sense of their own alienation from a rich and complex society coexisting with their own. Such a controversial celebration of the lives of the Scottish lower class, often at the expense of Britains aristocracy, is what I explore in my paper, examining poems as diverse as Tam o Shanter and Halloween for common subversive elements that undermine Burns written apologies for his seemingly unsophisticated prose. What previous Romantic authors had addressed only in the broadest terms, Burns narrows to a particularly sharp point, mounting a rigorous defense of Scotlands lower class, so often overlooked in favor of a privileged few.
  • Title: A Day at the Museum: The Exciting Life of a Curator
    Student: Katherine Ballentine
    Faculty mentor: Dana Price
    Type: Oral Presentation
    Time: 4:50-5:05
    Session: 3E Identification
    Location: HS 211 HS211

    The main goal of a natural history museum is to maintain collections of biological specimens, ranging from preserved organisms to DNA libraries. Museum collections are considered extremely valuable for five main reasons, including habitat loss, biological invasions, environmental change, public health and safety, and scientific research. The main objective of Dr. Prices research is to bioinventory and document scarab beetles from all 23 counties in Maryland. Scarabs are valuable members of the entomofauna for the many ecosystem services they provide, including recycling of different materials, such as plant waste and dung, seed dispersal, and pollination. My role in Dr. Prices research lab is to curate the Scarab Entomological Collection. My curatorial responsibilities include maintenance and enhancement of the collections, preparation for scientific loans and educational purposes, identification of specimens collected during summer 2013, and documentation of current scarab specimens into Excel spreadsheets. These data will ultimately be used to create a Taxonomic Guide to the Scarabaeoidae of Maryland.
  • Title: Citizen Science and Diversity of Scarab Beetles across Maryland
    Student: Elizabeth Bangert
    Faculty mentor: Dana Price
    Type: Oral Presentation
    Time: 1:50-2:05
    Session: 1E Animalia
    Location: HS 211 HS211

    The aim of Dr. Prices research lab is to publish a Taxonomic Guide to the Scarabaeoidea of Maryland. To accomplish this the distribution, status and natural histories of all scarab beetles found in MD will be examined. Our research has three main goals. The first is to involve Citizen Scientists by getting them excited about scarab beetles and scarab beetle identification. We will use a host of social media outlets and educational events to accomplish this goal. The second goal is to work with Dr. Prices personal beetle collection at Salisbury University. We will create original illustrations of species and genera, and create new taxonomic keys for species found in Maryland. Our third goal is to continue the bioinventory of Maryland scarabs in all counties. This will entail sampling in different habitats throughout Maryland, as well as the curation and identification of specimens collected. All three of our goals will help to further the knowledge of Maryland scarab beetles.
  • Title: Assessing Waste Management on the Municipal Level
    Student: Alice Belt
    Faculty mentor: Sarah Surak
    Type: Oral Presentation
    Time: 5:10-5:25
    Session: 3F Sundry
    Location: HS 243 HS243

    Successful municipal composting programs must overcome multiple barriers. The majority of composting programs in cities around the United States accept yard waste for compost, but do not allow organic waste to be composted. The research complied comes from a variety of online journal articles and websites that provide information on different composting programs throughout the United States. The content of this presentation includes research on municipal composting, organic waste, yard waste, and the barriers involved in composting. Although the majority of composting programs only accept yard waste, research has shown that there have been numerous examples of cities that proactively overcame the barriers and are composting organic waste municipally.
  • Title: Bike Rack Utilization and Bike Flow Study at Salisbury University
    Student: Michael Bengtson
    Faculty mentor: Sarah Surak
    Type: Oral Presentation
    Time:
    Session:  
    Location:

  • Title: Dynamics of a Double Pendulum with Isosceles Triangle Components
    Student: David Binkowski
    Faculty mentor: Jeffrey Emmert
    Type: Oral Presentation
    Time:
    Session:  
    Location:

  • Title: Thirty Years on the Lower Delmarva Peninsula: Understanding the Association Between Forest Birds and their Habitat
    Student: Marshall Boyd
    Faculty mentor: Ronald Gutberlet
    Type: Oral Presentation
    Time: 2:10-2:25
    Session: 1E Animalia
    Location: HS 211 HS211

    Thirty Years on the Lower Delmarva Peninsula: Understanding the Association between Forest Birds and their Habitat Marshall Boyd, Joseph Gutkoska, Brady Travis and Ronald Gutberlet Jr. Abstract Decades of data from multiple sources demonstrate widespread decline in many North American bird populations. Forest interior dwelling species (FIDS) have been of special concern owing to their need for large, undisturbed tracts of forest. Over 30 years ago (1979−1983) Robbins et al. (1989) studied bird populations and measured habitat variables at over 450 points within 271 forests throughout Maryland. Our study seeks to document any changes in forest bird populations and vegetation at their 140 points on the lower Delmarva Peninsula. The original data set, provided to us by Robbins and his collaborators, provides a unique opportunity to quantify these changes and investigate any correlation between changes in forest habitats and bird populations of the lower Delmarva Peninsula from 1979−2013. During summer 2012 and 2013, 90 species of birds were recorded from 79 points, with many FIDS in lower abundance compared to Robbins et al. (1989). Forty-nine sites had fewer total species, 27 had more, and 3 had the same number of species compared to 1979−83. Sixty sites had fewer FIDS, while 10 had more, and 9 had the same number of FIDS compared to 1979−83. A small portion of the former forested sites are now residential areas, farmland, or marshland. Although most sites are still forested, many of the forests are smaller than they were 30 years ago, putting stress on area-sensitive species. Data collection will conclude during summer 2014, allowing us to evaluate 30 years of change in forest bird populations and the structure of their habitat on the Lower Delmarva Peninsula.
  • Title: The Cherokee Removal: Justice or Not?
    Student: Daniella Bramble
    Faculty mentor: Jeanne Whitney
    Type: Oral Presentation
    Time: 4:30-4:45
    Session: 3C Freedom
    Location: HS 111 111

    The Cherokee from the 1790's through the 1850's faced issues involving their identity and property which would forever change their culture, customs, traditions, and lives. Although the Cherokee were one of the Civilized Tribes and excelled at adapting and assimilating Euro-American culture, it was not enough to protect them from other Americans during the period of Indian removal. Despite their best efforts to remain in their Georgia homes, they lost. The Indian Removal Act of 1830 gave the opportunity for the Cherokee to fight back using the lessons they had been taught through the observations and education provided by the Euro Americans. They fought back using the American Court System and through a plethora of petitions, memorials, letters, and later community assistance. Though the Cherokee did all they could, the utilization of the information they had acquired was not enough when it came down to the amount of controversy around the Removal Act, and later their final appealed case, nor was it an issue if they were assimilated or not, it came down to the fact that they would never be considered equal to the Euro American people.
  • Title: 'Effect of Hurricanes on Sea Surface Temperature'
    Student: Travis Bush
    Faculty mentor: Darren Parnell
    Type: Oral Presentation
    Time: 3:00-3:15
    Session: 2F Agua
    Location: HS 243 HS 243

    Hurricanes need warm sea surface temperatures in order to intensify and maintain their strength; if a strengthening storm moves over warmer water the intensification tends to be extremely rapid. As hurricanes move over the water upwelling occurs, resulting in cooler water being brought to the surface. It is anticipated that the differences in sea surface temperature (before and after passing over the region) is directly related to the strength of the hurricane passing over the region. This study focused on an area between 20-30 degrees North latitude and 80-95 degrees West longitude from 2000-2010 in order to keep the sample small and consistent enough to analyze with unbiased results. Each hurricane that formed or passed through the region was tracked by an advisory number. In order to ensure that there was enough data to use I separated the hurricanes into two different groups for analysis (Categories 1-2 and Categories 3-5). I was able to plot the hurricane tracks with GIS software using the advisory information for each storm. This would show the correlation of the tracks taken in different years. Next, I analyzed the hurricanes based on their maximum intensity (based on the Saffir-Simpson scale). A layer describing the bathymetry data for the Gulf of Mexico was downloaded into ArcGIS and the tracks for each storm were shown on the layer. After the results were collected I analyzed some hurricanes that had a severe impact on the coastal area at the time they made landfall. The final goal was to find correlations between the differences in the strength of a hurricane based on various sea conditions. These results have the potential to improve intensity forecasts of hurricanes farther into the future.
  • Title: Priming a Point: The Effect of Priming on Social Dominance Orientation
    Student: Katherine Calloway
    Faculty mentor: Mark Walter
    Type: Oral Presentation
    Time: 3:20-3:35
    Session: 2A Behavior
    Location: HS 103 HS103

    Extensive research has been conducted on social dominance orientation (SDO) and the effects of priming separately. Social dominant people view society as a hierarchy and fear those who threaten their placement. SDOs fear immigrants because they upset the strict hierarchy. Priming, on the other hand, is a theory by Dr. John Bargh which states that exposure to a stimulus influences a response to a later stimulus all non-consciously. For example, a person is given a list of words, either hot or cold, and told to unscramble them. The person is later asked to estimate the temperature of the room. According to priming, the temperature estimate is affected by the list of words the person was originally given because they are unconsciously thinking of either hot or cold words. But researchers have yet to investigate the relationship between SDO and priming. We propose that high SDOs will show a greater acceptance of SDO principles after being primed with submissive words or words in their latitude of rejection than those primed with power words due to the fact that they are already in their latitude of acceptance. Meanwhile, low SDOs will show a greater rejection of SDO principles after being primed with power words, or words in their latitude of rejection, than those primed with submissive words due to the fact that they are already in their latitude of acceptance Participants recruited from General Psychology participated in a two part survey. The first part only contained the 16-item SDO measure for a baseline. The second part of the survey involved randomly assigning the participants to a priming activity, followed by the same 16-item SDO measure. Finally, participants completed an allocation activity in which they divided $10,000 among charitable organizations of different political ideas. The data will be analyzed using correlations and ANOVA.
  • Title: The Green Party and the Democrats: Is American Liberalism as United as we Think?
    Student: Steven Cenname
    Faculty mentor: Sarah Surak
    Type: Oral Presentation
    Time: 4:50-5:05
    Session: 3D Current
    Location: HS 113 HS113

    Ideologically, the Green Party is more similar to the Democratic Party than the Republican Party, and this is evident by a good percentage of their members being former Democrats themselves. This research examines why these voters left the Democratic Party in favor of a party with little chance in statewide and national elections, and what the Democratic Party will have to do to get these voters back by studying a number of variables to examine both the state and the voter. For states, we examine how population, ideology, conservativeness of the states Democrats, and other factors affect the strength of the Green Party in that particular state. For the voter, we qualitatively examine how ideology, efficacy, environmental views, views on the duopoly of the American political system, and other factors make a voter more or less likely to join the Green Party. The thesis is attempting to prove that the Green Party maintains a core base of support because the Democratic Party has failed to distinguish itself from the Republican Party in terms of sources of funding, views on the issues, and dedication to the status quo. The organizational problem addressed is the Democrats inability to win over the left-leaning voters than identify with or vote for the Green Party.
  • Title: Hopeless Wanderer: A Dedication from the Mind to the Stage
    Student: Chelsea Chmel
    Faculty mentor: Mary Norton
    Type: Oral Presentation
    Time: 1:30-1:45
    Session: 1F Perform
    Location: HS 243 HS 243

    As a member of the Salisbury University Dance Company for eight consecutive semesters, I have had the opportunity to choreograph three original dance pieces for each of the Fall Annual Showcases in 2011, 2012, and 2013. This past fall 2013 semester, as a senior, I choreographed a piece called Hopeless Wanderer, which was performed in the Fall Showcase and adjudicated to be the most outstanding dance in the show. In my presentation, I will describe my inspiration for the dance, my methods of choreography, my use of the part-whole-part method for teaching it to the dancers, and my thought process and decisions for my musical choice, formations, level changes, lighting, props, and costume design. A video version of Hopeless Wanderer will be shown at the end. This choreographed work has a special meaning to me, and I hope audiences enjoy and find their own meaning from it.
  • Title: A Consideration in the Reform of Immigration Laws
    Student: Greca Cortes
    Faculty mentor: Carolina Bown
    Type: Oral Presentation
    Time: 3:20-3:35
    Session: 2B Politics
    Location: HS 109 HS109

    Since the founding of the United States, the country's core values have been based off three main beliefs: economic opportunity, freedom of religion, and its civil and political rights. Unfortunately these principles have not been always available for all Latino Immigrants. In this paper, I examine the causes of the vast waves of Hispanic immigrants that have been entering the United States illegally along with reasons for considering a reformation of immigration laws. Hispanics continue to have the largest population (52%) of undocumented civilians in the United States, at this point almost 12 million. Paradoxically, the never-ending growth of border patrol and expenses that has been spent to ensure security between the United States and Mexico has only encouraged the continuing entrance and stay of undocumented immigrants. The American Dream is not only a promise of hope and freedom, but stability and opportunity and as long as there are jobs in the United States, there will be a continuing influx of Hispanic immigrants, legal or illegal. Furthermore, for most of the undocumented immigrants, citizenship is not their priority. Obtaining a driver's license, the ability to work in the country legally, and a visa to travel in and out of the country are enough for this group of hard-working people. Therefore, the government of the United States may want to consider an immigration law, similar to the one passed in 1986, which guaranteed a legal status to 2 million unauthorized immigrants and granted work permits to the 1 million who worked in agriculture. Taken together, a similar reform would provide jobs with better pay; possibly decrease the poverty in the community of undocumented Latinos, and encourage a path to legalization.
  • Title: Status Reassessment and Habitat Requirements of the Carpenter Frog (Lithobates virgatipes) in Maryland
    Student: Jacqueline Darrow
    Faculty mentor: Ronald Gutberlet
    Type: Oral Presentation
    Time: 3:20-3:35
    Session: 2E Habitats
    Location: HS 211 HS211

    The carpenter frog (Lithobates virgatipes) is an S3 Watchlist species in Maryland and is due for population status reassessment. During this study, in collaboration with the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, we are revisiting all known carpenter frog localities to determine if populations persist at these sites. Habitat variables, including surface water pH, canopy cover, hydroperiod, and vegetation structure, are being measured at each site. The first of two field seasons was completed during summer 2013. Carpenter Frogs were only detected at 10 out of the 32 locations sampled, which suggests that carpenter frog populations are declining, however we need another field season to verify this. Dorchester County sites had the lowest frequency of detection (1/19), and Caroline County sites the highest (6/13). As expected, water was acidic at locations where carpenter frogs were detected. Our data also support a strong correlation between the carpenter frogs and the presence of Walters Sedge (Carex striata) and Sphagnum Moss (Sphagnum flexuosum). The second and final field season will be completed in summer 2014; all sites will be revisited and vegetation surveys will be conducted. The state of Maryland needs to monitor changes in carpenter frog populations to determine whether S3 is still the appropriate designation for this species.
  • Title: Resources and Programs for Families in Wicomico County: Perceptions of Need
    Student: Victoria De Hoyos
    Faculty mentor: Michele Schlehofer
    Type: Oral Presentation
    Time: 2:10-2:25
    Session: 1C Perceptions
    Location: HS 111 HS111

    Every 10 years in Wicomico County, the Wicomico Partnership for Families and Children (WPFC), conducts a needs assessment of programs and resources for families and children within Wicomico County. This year, Salisbury University students, assisted the WPFC with their needs assessment by interviewing 27 community key informants (70% female; 81.5% Caucasian; 40.7% had a Bachelors degree) regarding their perceptions WPFC priority areas in Wicomico County. Key informants were primarily high-level administrators of government and non-profit organizations in Wicomico County that work with families and children; (81.5% were residents of Wicomico County, and they had worked in Wicomico County an average of 18.28 years). Each participant was given 10 topics matching the WPFC funding areas: academic performance; bullying; crime; dropout; family poverty; mental health crisis services; out of school time opportunities; teen pregnancy; truancy; and youth employment; they were asked to rank topics in order from most pressing concern to least pressing concern. Participants ranked family poverty, as most pressing (ranked in top three by 20 people), followed by crime (ranked in top three by 17 people), mental health crisis services (ranked in top three by 11 people) and out of school time opportunities (ranked in the top three by 9 people) Once each topic was ranked, participants were asked why they choose their top three topics, what programs currently available in the county address this community problem, and how the county can improve the situation. After transcribing the interviews, an inductive coding process was used to summarize key informants recommendations and suggestions for addressing each of the top-ranked problems. These findings will be presented at the SUSURC. The WPFC will use these findings toallocate funds to various non-profit organizations in Wicomico County.
  • Title: The Diversity of the napa Gene in Local Wetland Sediments
    Student: Kathy Dunning
    Faculty mentor: Katherine Miller
    Type: Oral Presentation
    Time:
    Session:  
    Location:

  • Title: From Disdain to Esteem: An autoethnographical study on the socio-cultural views on disability in Africa and the US and how they facilitate accepting, dealing and living with a disability.
    Student: Wele Elangwe
    Faculty mentor: Vitus Ozoke
    Type: Oral Presentation
    Time: 2:30-2:45
    Session: 1C Perceptions
    Location: HS 111 HS111

    This autoethnography will explore my self-perceptions as I transition from an able-bodied to a woman with a disability in the United States. It will chronicle my experiences and internal battle as I struggle to understand and be accepting of my condition. I will identify and discuss my perception of people with disabilities, a perception grounded on my Cameroonian socio-cultural background, and the shift in that perception after I became a woman with disability in the United States. The purpose of this study is twofold: 1). It provides a personalized account of how culture influences the acceptance of, and dealing with, a disability; 2). It examines cultural differences in gender perceptions and possible effect of those perceptions in the differential treatment of people with disability along gender lines. The central question of this study is: How do the American socio-cultural attitudes differ from the African socio-cultural attitudes on disability and gender, and how do those attitudes facilitate or hinder accepting, living and coping with disability? As an autoethnography, I am both the researcher and the research participant. I will use reflective journaling, recollection, art, artifacts and interviews as data sources. I will analyze and interpret the data to understand the socio-cultural meanings of thoughts, reactions, behaviors and events, and to deconstruct the socio-cultural undertones of what I recall, observed, experienced and was told. With natural biases that may arise from exaggeration and embarrassment from facts, I will verify data by source triangulation. The theoretical frame for this study is social constructivism, as it relates to identity construction of African women with disabilities. Using advocacy/participatory worldview, I will advocate for the African woman with disability who suffers from stigma due to African socio-cultural attitudes.
  • Title: The Sick Rose: Blake's Declaration for Sexual Freedom
    Student: Brooke Feichtl
    Faculty mentor: Lucy Morrison
    Type: Oral Presentation
    Time: 5:30-5:45
    Session: 3C Freedom
    Location: HS 111 HS111

    If read in a literal sense, William Blakes The Sick Rose can be read as campaigning for the preservation of virginity until marriage. However, through irony, Blake portrays his disapproval of the cultural conservatism of sex for married individuals and women. During the time period in which Blake wrote, women faced severe sexual inequality both in and outside of marriage. Because Blake writes about this topic, he highlights how badly women were discriminated against on the basis of their sexual partners and that they were constricted as to whom they could be physically involved with. Usually, they were solely limited to enter physical relationships with the man that they were married to. However, if they strayed from this norm, they were harshly punished, while men received a lesser punishment or did not face repercussions for the same crime. Blake emphasizes discrimination against women but also details the lack of sexual freedom that married people endured as well. This particular restriction resonated strongly with Blake, who often felt constricted in his marriage, which is evidenced by events in his life and frequently detailed in his writings. Blakes emphasis on these two sexually confined demographics shows that society as a whole was affected by the constricting rules of the time and thus a large portion of the population suffered from a lack of sexual freedom. Through word choice, the sexual nature of the poem becomes obvious with hints such as the Rose (1) and worm (2). Blakes extravagant description of harmless objects creates a haunting picture of these entities, portraying his irony and true message of the poem. Due to Blakes sexually charged messages, his writings are credited with supporting the free love movement of the 19th Century and have allowed for more liberal ideas of sexual freedom to be common today.
  • Title: The Catch with Mary Tudor's Humanist Education
    Student: Alexandra Fox
    Faculty mentor: Kristen Walton
    Type: Oral Presentation
    Time: 3:40-3:55
    Session: 2C Worldly
    Location: HS 111 HS111

    Mary Tudor's humanist education is an excellent example that demonstrates how sixteenth century upper-class women suffered limitations in their education. In the sixteenth century, women grew up in a patriarchal society that believed women were inferior to men, thus women did not need to receive the same education as men. Women's education had some successes, for the girls that could afford to be educated learned the languages, history, and ideas of the world. These same girls also learned where they stood in the patriarchal world, and how to be ideal, chaste women. Although Mary Tudor received one of the best humanist educations, the restrictions in her education emphasizes the expectations of her to be an ideal Christian woman, as well as a desirable pawn in her father's political objectives, which led to her contradicting image as the first Queen of England.
  • Title: The Forgotten Labor Force: Indentured Servitude in Colonial Barbados 1627-1675
    Student: Rachel Frock
    Faculty mentor: Kristen Walton
    Type: Oral Presentation
    Time: 4:50-5:05
    Session: 3C Freedom
    Location: HS 111 HS111

    The history of colonial Barbados traditionally claims the introduction of sugar cane and the African slaves that cultivated it as the catalyst that allowed the tiny island of the Lesser Antilles to transform into one of the most valuable possession of the early British Empire. However, the role of the indentured servants on the island of Barbados has been mistakenly minimized by history time and time again. In fact, it is the indentured servants that are the key entity that truly allowed the society to evolve from an island of mere yeomen farmers to the most lucrative gem of the New World during the first half of the Seventeenth Century.
  • Title: Development of an efficient synthesis of the anti-migraine drug olcegepant.
    Student: Melanie Goldstein
    Faculty mentor: Stephen Habay
    Type: Oral Presentation
    Time: 1:30-1:45
    Session: 1B Reaction
    Location: HS 109 HS 109

    Migraine is a chronic, debilitating pain disorder that affects about 12% of the Western population at least once a year. Therapy with triptans is presently considered the most effective treatment of migraine. However, approximately one-third of patients do not respond to triptans and there is a high recurrence rate of migraine after having taken the drugs. Thus, there is a large, unmet need for effective migraine treatments. Olcegepant is a calcitonin gene-related peptide antagonist that has been found to be effective in the treatment of acute migraine headaches. The current method for synthesizing olcegepant is a total of about 15 steps and results in a 55% yield. Our goal is to develop a shorter, more efficient synthetic route for the anti-migraine drug. While synthesizing the first fragment of the olcegepant molecule, we were unsure if we were synthesizing the desired isomer when using our original three step synthesis plan. A plan to synthesize what could only be the desired compound was devised using a five step synthesis. Using NMR spectra, we confirmed that the structure of the product of our three step synthesis was the desired compound. After successfully synthesizing the fragments of the molecule, we have continued to work on the synthesis of olcegepant by attempting to couple the fragments together. We propose that from the four basic fragments of the molecule we will be able to synthesize olcegepant through a series three coupling reactions.
  • Title: Thinking Fast and Slow: A Heuristic Model
    Student: micheal heeke
    Faculty mentor: Larence Becker
    Type: Oral Presentation
    Time: 5:10-5:25
    Session: 3D Current
    Location: HS 113 HS113

    While reading the book Thinking Fast and Slow by Dr. Kahneman we were introduced to some of the work he has done in the past concerning decision making and cognition as well as some of the many heuristics that people use to navigate everyday life. One such heuristic that we found particularly interesting was the Availability Heuristic. The Availability Heuristic was conceived by Kahneman and Tversky in the early seventies. It hypothesizes that people judge the likelihood or frequency of an event occurring based on the amount of cognitive difficulty there is in recollecting instances of that event from memory. If instances of the event can be recalled with relative ease it is judged to be more likely, likewise if instances are difficult to recall than it is judged to be less likely to occur. While early research left room for ambiguity in the causal relationship between recall ability and perceived likelihood of occurrence later research has confirmed Kahneman and Tverskys original hypothesis (Schwartz, 1991.). what we will be presenting is a mathematical model of the Availability Heuristic and the hypothesized interaction between ease of recall and perceived likelihood of occurrence, where x = number of instances asked to be recalled and f(x)= level of cognitive difficulty in recollection. We believe that there is a fixed value of f(x) that will correlate with the point at which the level of cognitive ease experienced will change from signaling an event as more probable to less probable.
  • Title: New records and morphological comparison of Capsala pricei and C. poeyi (Platyhelminthes: Monogenea) form white marlin, blue marlin, and sailfish of the western Atlantic Ocean.
    Student: Laura Hopkins
    Faculty mentor: Ann Barse
    Type: Oral Presentation
    Time: 4:00-4:15
    Session: 2F Agua
    Location: HS 243 HS243

    Monogenean flatworms (Platyhelminthes) in the Family Capsalidae, subfamily Capsalinae are ectoparasites of marine fishes, commonly found in/on the gills, mouth, nares, and skin. In this subfamily there are 36 recognized species in four genera, and all are parasitic in pelagic gamefishes. Monogeneans were collected from four billfish species (Istiophoridae) between 1988 and 2013, mostly during the White Marlin Open billfishing tournament in Ocean City, MD. We are working to (1) mount all collected monogeneans on slides, (2) update host and geographical records for two species we identified: Capsala poeyi (Vigueras, 1935) and C. pricei Hildago-Escalente, 1950, and (3) update the species description for C. poeyi. Formalin-preserved specimens were stained in hematoxylin, mounted in Canada balsam, and examined with an Olympus BX53 DIC compound microscope. Our samples represent new parasite-host records for C. poeyi from blue marlin, and sailfish, and C. pricei from white marlin, and blue marlin. This is also the first geographical record for C. poeyi and C. pricei from any fish species in the Atlantic Ocean. Capsala poeyi was inadequately described in 1935, and briefly redescribed in 1938. We are currently photographing and comparing morphometric features (e.g., spines, eggs, distribution and shape of papillae, details of reproductive structures) between C. poeyi and C. pricei. Photographs and measurements are being taken with a 35mm DSLR camera and iSolutions Lite software, and we have begun hand drawing the specimens using an Olympus drawing tube. The continuation of this work will lead to a detailed redescription of the morphology of C. poeyi and a better understanding of the distribution of C. poeyi and C. pricei in worldwide pelagic ecosystems.
  • Title: Belize Study Abroad: An Exploration of Cross-Cultural Health Perspectives in Developed and Developing Countries
    Student: Julia Howser
    Faculty mentor: Lincoln Gibbs
    Type: Oral Presentation
    Time: 3:00-3:15
    Session: 2C Worldly
    Location: HS 111 HS111

    This presentation highlights the differences and similarities between health practices in both developed and developing countries through research and personal accounts attained while teaching proper health practices to elementary school children in Belize. School achievement and attendance are negatively affected by the regularity of illness and poor health in developing countries, due to relatively menial access to amenities such as soap, hand sanitizer, and clean water. While school success is no doubt influenced by a variety of factors, there is a vicious cycle in which poverty can lead to nutritional deficiencies, which can then affect school attendance, and cognitive and physical development. In low-income countries, HIV/AIDS, perinatal conditions, diarrheal diseases, tuberculosis, and malaria all run rampant. In contrast, leading causes of death in high-income countries include lung cancer, colon cancer, diabetes mellitus, stomach cancer, breast cancer, and Alzheimers. Pediatric interventions tend to be undervalued because they are usually preventative and their lasting effects can largely be perceived during far-off future years, but this very reason is what makes these interventions so influential. Most interventions would require methods of determining the most effective ways to reduce mortality and disease, both from an economic and health standpoint; however, educational programs that target children and begin at a young age are also effective and produce the spread of health knowledge and preventative practices.
  • Title: Quidditch: Revolutionizing Sports Culture
    Student: Alexandra Iannucci
    Faculty mentor: James Burton
    Type: Oral Presentation
    Time: 2:10-2:25
    Session: 1D Competition
    Location: HS 113 HS113

    Eight years ago, Quidditch was known only as the fictional game played on flying broomstick in the Harry Potter series. Today, hundreds of teams around the world play the real-life interpretation. Quidditch has many characteristics of a
  • Title: Allen Research Project
    Student: Artura Jackson
    Faculty mentor: Kara French
    Type: Oral Presentation
    Time: 5:30-5:45
    Session: 3B Meaning
    Location: HS 109 HS109

    Three students from Salisbury University will conduct research to examine the town of Allen, Maryland and to contribute to the historical record of the African American community of Allen. The central question of this research is how has the African American Community contributed to the town of Allen and shaped its culture. Data will be collected through oral histories collected from the residents of Allen, from publicly disclosed records and publications as well as academic research. The result of the research will be added to the public record and stored at the Edward H. Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History and Culture. This research will explore the African American community of Allen as well as their interaction with the White community of Allen. The African American community will be the focus of this research in order to preserve their unique community and history for posterity and to make current divisions more readily clear to the greater academic community. Considering the pattern of contemporary segregation and self-segregation present throughout the United States.
  • Title: Dynamics of a Double Pendulum with Isosceles Triangle Components
    Student: Zachary Jackson
    Faculty mentor: Jeffrey Emmert
    Type: Oral Presentation
    Time: 4:50-5:05
    Session: 3F Sundry
    Location: HS 243 HS243

    The double pendulum is a relatively simple dynamical system that is very sensitive to initial conditions. An isosceles triangle double compound pendulum exhibits chaotic behavior that is richer than that of the simple double pendulum due to changes in the center of gravity and moment of inertia of each pendulum component. We have studied the dynamics of a double pendulum with isosceles triangle components through Lagrangian mechanics, a computer simulation using Mathematica, and a working physical model.
  • Title: Relationship Aggression on College Campuses
    Student: Ashley Jeter
    Faculty mentor: Timothy Dunn
    Type: Oral Presentation
    Time: 4:00-4:15
    Session: 2A Behavior
    Location: HS 103 HS103

    In this pilot study that we conducted we researched interpersonal relationship aggression on college campuses. We surveyed 60 college students in order to obtain information on the occurrence of relationship aggression on Salisbury University's campus, as well as the perceived characteristics of healthy and unhealthy relationships. We also conducted 5 in depth qualitative interviews with male and female college students on some topics related to the issue. We plan to use our information and data collected in order to benefit our campus community by raising awareness of the issue and educating students. We found that 21% of college students reported having experienced dating violence by a current partner and 32% experienced dating violence by a previous partner. For participants of our survey this served as a tool of reflection and will help students consider the nature of their own relationships, past or present, as well as those of the friends involved. It will help in the future by aiding in the recognition of any issues or problems that may be markers of an unhealthy relationship. We discovered that many college students could not identify these markers, from our survey results. At the completion of this study, we plan to reflect and share our results to the University, in hopes of improving the well-being of college students on college campuses.
  • Title: RNA Interference Knockdown of Wdr-20 in C. elegans
    Student: Meagan Jezek
    Faculty mentor: Patti Erickson
    Type: Oral Presentation
    Time: 5:30-5:45
    Session: 3F Sundry
    Location: HS 243 HS243

    RNAi, or RNA interference, is a post-transcriptional gene silencing mechanism that functions by recognizing and silencing foreign RNA molecules within an organism. The use of this gene silencing mechanism can be applied in research settings in order to observe the effect of a gene knockdown in an organism which could lead to further characterization of the gene's function. In this study, I am using two specific gene cloning techniques in an attempt to create an RNAi construct for the Caenorhabditis elegans gene wdr-20. Wdr-20 encodes a WD40 repeat protein that is thought to be involved in the regulation of a deubiquitinating enzyme complex active in the ventral nerve cord of C. elegans. The two techniques that I am using to create the RNAi construct for wdr-20 are the TA cloning method and a relatively new technique called FastCloning. Both methods involve the creation of a plasmid containing the wdr-20 gene sequence that, when expressed, will create a double-stranded RNA molecule. Once developed, this plasmid will be transformed into NEB5α and HT115(DE3) E. coli cells and then ingested by the worms. The presence of double-stranded RNA for the gene wdr-20 will invoke the worms' natural RNAi defense pathway and lead to the silencing of that gene. The resulting lack of expression will allow me to observe and further characterize the phenotype of the gene knockdown and perhaps provide more insight into the function of this gene in C. elegans.
  • Title: The U.S. Federal Government has banned the Cure to Cancer.
    Student: Kaitlyn Johnson
    Faculty mentor: Timothy Dunn
    Type: Oral Presentation
    Time: 5:30-5:45
    Session: 3D Current
    Location: HS 113 HS113

    More than 14 million Americans use marijuana regularly despite the federal law banning the substance; this shows an outstanding gap between the population and the federal government. Artifacts have told us that marijuana has been cultivated and consumed by the human race since at least 7200 B.C, as cannabis textiles have been recovered from that era. The plant has been used for various purposes; textiles, food, medicine, clothes, paper, and a social mood enhancer. The chemical THC has receptors found not only in the mammalian brain but throughout the human body; in the nervous system and also the immune system which gives researchers insight to how marijuana helps moderate inflammation and pain. According to the National Cancer Institute at the National Institute of Health, cannabinoids have been successful in curing cancer. Cannabinoids may cause antitumor effects by various mechanisms, including induction of cell death, inhibition of cell growth, and inhibition of tumor angiogenesis invasion and metastasis. (National institute of Health, Cannabis and Cannabinoids, 2013) Because marijuana is considered to be an anti-cancerous medicine, one could make the case that the federal government is violating human rights and endangering people by taking their crucial medicine away. In this report, I drew information from various sources including government documents, medical assessments, policy reports and press accounts.
  • Title: A tail of two color morphs: Tail autotomization in striped and unstriped salamanders
    Student: Eric Kalin
    Faculty mentor: Eric Liebgold
    Type: Oral Presentation
    Time: 1:30-1:45
    Session: 1E Animalia
    Location: HS 211 HS211

    Color polymorphism is present in many animal species and color can be beneficial or detrimental to the survival of an organism. This begs an important question in evolutionary ecology research: why does multiple color morphs persist within a population in nature? Our experiment focused on two common color morphs of Plethodon cinereus: striped and unstriped, the latter of which is becoming substantially more common, concomitant with climate change. One previous study found that the unstriped morph was more mobile and had increased tail-loss. We hypothesized that there would be a significant difference in tail-loss and survival between the two morphs. Using mark-recapture methods, we determined if there are differences in the rates of tail autotomization between the two color morphs on the Eastern Shore and whether increased activity of unstriped salamanders leads to faster regrowth of tails. The same recapture methods were used to determine differences in the overall survival rates. We predicted that the unstriped morph has a lower survival rate and more tail-loss but also faster regrowth of tails allowing persistence of both morphs in a population.
  • Title: Altering Growth Rates and Nutritional Qualities of Microalgal Feedstock with Symbiotic Bacteria
    Student: Stephen Kelly
    Faculty mentor: Mark Holland
    Type: Oral Presentation
    Time: 1:30-1:45
    Session: 1A Microbial
    Location: HS 103 HS103

    The cultivation of microalgae has many commercial purposes; it is integral in the farming of marine animals such as finfish, shrimp, and bivalves through its use as feedstock, and it has potential for use in renewable energy sources as a biofuel. Pink pigmented facultatively methylotrophic bacteria (PPFM) live symbiotically on plants, feeding off of plant metabolic wastes and producing growth regulators and nutrients vital for plant development. One strain of vitamin B12 over-producing PPFM has been previously isolated by our lab, and past research has indicated that co-culturing microalgae with PPFM can increase growth rates. Our research investigates the possibility of altering the growth rates and nutritional qualities of microalgae through the use of PPFM by conducting algae growth experiments and nutritional analysis. We are also working to identify the various species of PPFM associated with algae stock cultures and the vitamin B12 overproducing strain.
  • Title: An Analysis of African American Cemeteries on the Eastern Shore
    Student: Colby Kish
    Faculty mentor: Jason Boroughs
    Type: Oral Presentation
    Time: 4:30-4:45
    Session: 3F Sundry
    Location: HS 243 HS243

    For my presentation at the SUSRC I will be discussing my research on African American Cemeteries on the Eastern Shore. My research analyzes the demographic information such as age, gender, and family relations collected from nearby cemeteries in Cambridge and Salisbury, Maryland. I will also be discussing the importance that these cemeteries have had to the local communities who have over the last century, put its members in these graves through an analysis of the spatial arrangement of the graves and the material goods left at the graves. In addition I will be comparing and contrasting the cemeteries to see if there are any common or different, practices from city to city.
  • Title: Behavioral Genetic Analysis of Spring Peeper (Pseudacris crucifer) Populations in Maryland and Louisiana
    Student: Ashley Kobisk
    Faculty mentor: Kimberly Hunter
    Type: Oral Presentation
    Time: 3:40-3:55
    Session: 2E Habitats
    Location: HS 211 HS211

    Sexual selection, especially female mate choice, is an important selective agent driving biological evolution and diversity of animal signals. Here we combine behavioral and genetic studies in an effort to understand how female mate choice influences the evolution of male courtship signals in the spring peeper frog, Pseudacris crucifer. Using behavioral mate choice experiments and microsatellite analysis, we compared female preferences for male call parameters and genetic variation in Maryland and Louisiana populations of these frogs. Our behavioral data show that female peepers prefer longer calls. Unlike many other frog species, however, female spring peepers do not express strong preferences for certain male call types such as low frequency calls. This suggests that female peepers are less selective about mates than other frog species. Genetic analysis of seven loci for four consecutive years, 2011-2014, reveals a homogenous genetic structure for the peeper population in Louisiana, but four distinct subpopulations of peepers within Maryland. The genetic structure found in the Maryland spring peeper population suggests that there are barriers to gene flow. While female peepers have a preference for longer calls, the overall behavioral data suggest that this is not sufficient for providing barriers to gene flow and generating the genetic groups we found. Future investigations must be conducted to explain the lack of mixing of genotypes.
  • Title: Music of Ancient Rome: How Does it Relate to Us?
    Student: Kassidy Korb
    Faculty mentor: Leslie Yarmo
    Type: Oral Presentation
    Time: 1:50-2:05
    Session: 1F Perform
    Location: HS 243 HS243

    As individuals we are exposed to music throughout our lives without fully comprehending how this came to be. The purpose of this research project is to educate the general public about the ways that the Ancient Romans utilized music and how they directly relate to todays modern society. This project touches on the uses of music at funerals, in the military, during theatrical performances, and the presence of music in education. Culminating this research in Italy allowed for the realization that as a society we literally walk on top of the ruins of societies that have laid the foundations for our musical experiences. This project should be informative and influence a new perspective on how the presence of music has evolved over time but is still rooted in the rich history of ancient cultures.
  • Title: Reeling in the Past: The Archaeology of Early Fish Hooks
    Student: Mike Le
    Faculty mentor: Elizabeth Ragan
    Type: Oral Presentation
    Time: 3:20-3:35
    Session: 2F Agua
    Location: HS 243 HS 243

    In the distant past ancient peoples solved some of their daily problems by combining ingenious simplicity with locally available materials. It is hard to imagine though true that five or ten thousand years ago individuals were able to battle with a five hundred pound fish in a small one man boat due to the handmade wooden fish hook on the end of their line. This research aims to explain the various fish hook forms seen throughout the world. Are similar fish hooks a result of migrations from one region to another? To what extent does the shape of fish hooks transfer to the areas we see them distributed in, are people borrowing types from their neighbors? Could shape be associated with use, which is why certain forms are chosen over others? The modes of form and function are linked to human nature. These topics show that characteristics vary due to environmental conditions, resources available, and the process of how individuals visualize the final style of tools while working with certain materials.
  • Title: The Effects of Antiretroviral Therapy in South Africa: Mother-to-Child Transmission
    Student: Amanda Lorenz
    Faculty mentor: Tina Reid
    Type: Oral Presentation
    Time:
    Session:  
    Location:

  • Title: Sexual Assault on Campus
    Student: Lindsay McCoy
    Faculty mentor: Adam Hoffman
    Type: Oral Presentation
    Time: 3:40-3:55
    Session: 2A Behavior
    Location: HS 103 HS103

    The intended goal of my research is to find out if there is causation between sexual assaults and involvement with fraternities on Salisbury Universitys campus. The first part of my inquiry is whether female students who interact with fraternities are more likely to become victims of sexual assault than those who do not associate with these members of the Greek community. The second part of my inquiry is whether fraternity members are more likely to perpetrate sexual assaults than those who are not members of Greek organizations. Sexual assault is a significant problem on college campuses. Studies have shown that roughly one out or four college-aged women have been victims of sexual assault (Foubert, Garner, & Thaxter, 2006) and are at greater risk for rape and other forms of sexual assault than women in the general population or in a comparable age group (Fisher, Cullen, & Turner, 2000.) The availability of alcohol combined with the homogenous group structure the fraternity provides creates a rape-fertile environment (Boeringer, 1999.) I will administer surveys to large lecture classes to obtain a convenience sample of around 400 students. Questions will consist of demographic information, alcohol consumption, campus involvement, and history of sexual assault. The surveys will be anonymous. Students will only be identified through a number on their survey. I anticipate that female students who interact often with fraternity members will be more likely to be victims of sexual assault and will have a higher rate of alcohol consumption than female students who do not interact often with fraternity members. Fraternity members will likely have higher rates of alcohol consumption than non-members and will be more likely to engage in sexual activity with someone who is under the influence of alcohol, using body language as the primary indicator of consent.
  • Title: Children's ability to report episodic memories of their own learning
    Student: Lynly Meunier
    Faculty mentor: Rhyannon Bemis
    Type: Oral Presentation
    Time: 3:40-3:55
    Session: 2D Recall
    Location: HS 113 HS113

    In the present study, preschoolers were tested in their ability to recall instances of learning in a naturalistic source monitoring task. In the task children participated in two learning events about the Aleutian Islands and the visual system. Then, immediately following each event each child was questioned regarding what they had just learned and how they learned it. Specifically, children were asked ten questions in total; six questions about facts they had learned in the learning events (3 from each event) and four questions about their general factual knowledge taken from the Brain Quest Trivia games. There were eighteen participants in total ranging in age from four to six years. For analysis, children were divided in two groups, younger preschoolers and older preschoolers. The younger preschool group consisted of nine four-year-olds (M = 4 years, 4 months) and the older preschool group consisted of nine five-year-olds (M= 5 years, 6 months). Results indicated that all children reported recalling some instances of learning in response to the questions regarding the novel information. However, their performance was not near ceiling.
  • Title: The Effects of Diverse Farming Practices on Dung Beetle Populations Across Maryland
    Student: Kaitlyn Mitchell
    Faculty mentor: Dana Price
    Type: Oral Presentation
    Time: 4:00-4:15
    Session: 2E Habitats
    Location: HS 211 HS211

    Dung beetles are well known for the ecosystem services they provide that directly benefit human society. Their role in agricultural systems, in particular, is vital to increasing primary productivity and suppression of livestock pests and parasites. Improved understanding of the ecological functions provided by dung beetles is critical to the management of these services. The goal of our research is to examine dung beetle (Scarabaeinae) species richness and abundance on 16 organic and conventionally managed cattle farms across Maryland. During the summer of 2013, we set dung baited pitfall transects on each farm, once a month (June-September), for a 4 day period. Specimens were returned to the lab for sorting, identification, and data entry. Currently our data suggest there was no significant difference in abundance of dung beetles between the two types of farms (organic and conventional). However, native species were recorded in higher abundance on organic farms and introduced species were more abundant on conventional.
  • Title: ​The major influence on student perceptions toward global climate change
    Student: Victor Morales
    Faculty mentor: Karl Maier
    Type: Oral Presentation
    Time: 2:10-2:25
    Session: 1B Reaction
    Location: HS 109 HS109

    Global climate change has been a heated debate over the past several years, but little attention has been placed on student perceptions associated with the phenomenon. Two variables that may influence student perceptions on climate change are the number of science courses they have taken and their major academic area of study. The sample consisted of 317 Salisbury University students (91 males and 226 females) from various Psychology courses that were willing to participate for extra credit. Participants were invited to complete the study through an email with a link to a web-based survey. Participants were asked to identify their major area of study, how many science courses they have taken at Salisbury University, and to answer questions about their beliefs on global climate change. We expect to find that students whose major area of study belongs to the Henson School of Science are more likely to believe that global climate change is occurring due to the number of science courses they have taken.
  • Title: Punk Rock and Rebellion: Surviving the Troubles in Northern Ireland
    Student: Mark Oberly
    Faculty mentor: Kristen Walton
    Type: Oral Presentation
    Time: 2:10-2:25
    Session: 1F Perform
    Location: HS 243 HS243

    The Troubles in Northern Ireland represent a complex period of history resulting from a confluence of various factors ranging from the political, to the cultural, and ethnic; the conflict was a regional sectarian and nationalist movement, but drew up on deep seated historical factors as well as contemporary ones. The violent period had a deep impact on the people who lived through and grew up during the era; inversely the people themselves had a huge impact on the era, the course of the Troubles, and the culture of the time period. Interesting lens to look at the period is then found in the culture of the period and the accounts of those who lived through the tensions. Such includes the punk rock of bands like Stiff Little Fingers or the Undertones, as well as the writings of the famous, or infamous Bobby Sands, activist, paramilitary and political prisoner. Understanding the accounts and cultural context of the period is key to a broader understanding of the events and offers valuable historical context. Ultimately the events of the Troubles had profound effects on the cultural psyche of the people of Northern Ireland, which in turn helped precipitate cultural changes that altered the conflict and eventually helped to lead to its large-scale dissolution.
  • Title: Have We Met? Biases in Facial Recognition
    Student: Andrew Olah
    Faculty mentor: Mark Walter
    Type: Oral Presentation
    Time: 3:20-3:35
    Session: 2D Recall
    Location: HS 113 HS113

    The Cross Race Effect (CRE) is an established psychological phenomenon that states people are better able to distinguish between faces of their own race than they can between faces not of their own race. This study assesses whether the CRE is more likely to be committed by certain people; namely, those scoring high on measures of Right-Wing Authoritarianism (RWA) and Social Dominance Orientation (SDO). Further, we test whether there is a similar effect for sexual orientation in addition to a race bias. The subjects are shown 40 faces that fit in a 2x2 experimental design (black or white skin; straight or gay caption) for 5 seconds each, then are asked to complete a filler task, then are tested to see how many of the original 40 faces they can remember out of a larger sample of 80 faces. The participants also take surveys to establish where they fall on the RWA and SDO scales; additionally, information concerning attitudes towards homosexuals as well as past and present interaction with homosexuals is collected. We hypothesize that white RWAs will not only remember white faces more than black faces but will also better recognize straight faces compared to gay faces. We further hypothesize that the straight/gay bias will not be found for those scoring high in SDO.
  • Title: Music's Effects on Wordlist Recall: Investigation of Cross-Modal Processing
    Student: Thomas Parrish
    Faculty mentor: Meredith Patterson
    Type: Oral Presentation
    Time: 4:00-4:15
    Session: 2D Recall
    Location: HS 113 HS113

    The study explores possible relationships between the processing modalities of both language and music, by assessing the effect of listening to music on memorizing a word list. The first variable manipulated was the music heard which differed between each subject, being a no music control, a song in a feel of two or a song in a feel of three. The other variable manipulated was within subject being the syllable lengths of the two wordlist subjects memorized, one consisting of only two syllable words and the other three. Thirty-two volunteer psychology students at Salisbury University studied words on a computer monitor, one at a time, while the background track of music played. Participants were told to memorize as many words as they could and record them on a recall sheet at the end of the word list. The original hypothesis of the study was that the time signature and the number of syllables per word would interact in such a way, that recall would be enhanced when the feel and structure were congruent and impeded if not. The original hypothesis was not supported by the data. However the presence of music in general did have a negative impact on word recall. Participants recalled fewer words when they listened to music while learning the words than when not listening to music. It may be that music while encoding linguistic information (word lists), may create an additional load on the cognitive resources of language areas of the brain.
  • Title: Analysis of messenger RNA transcripts of denitrifying genes from microbial soil communities
    Student: Dustin Parsons
    Faculty mentor: Katherine Miller
    Type: Oral Presentation
    Time:
    Session:  
    Location:

  • Title: THE ELECTION OF 1828: A CHANGING OF THE U.S. POLITICAL LANDSCAPE
    Student: Victoria Patterson
    Faculty mentor: Jeanne Whitney
    Type: Oral Presentation
    Time: 3:00-3:15
    Session: 2B Politics
    Location: HS 109 HS 109

    Rising political activism amongst the American populace led to utilization of new campaigning strategies preceding the 1828 presidential election. These strategies helped electoral contenders accommodate societal desire for elections based on candidate transparency and public image. Such developments permanently altered how future generations would approach political campaigning in America. When analyzing the 1828 presidential campaigns of Andrew Jackson and John Quincy Adams, I considered the following: How did candidates use new campaign strategies to gain public favor? What specific strategies were introduced? Which candidate employed these strategies with greater success? What strategies were better utilized by Jacksons campaign causing him to win the election? I examined newspaper articles, election results, political cartoons, flyers, music scores, dishware and other material election-themed novelties. Articles in the New Hampshire Patriot & Star Gazette and the U.S. Telegraph revealed an upsurge in slander and formation of a multi-tiered Jacksonian campaign network. Written and illustrated images in newspapers and on material items demonstrated advertising of pre-formed public images for each candidate. Also evidenced were elevated importance of popular vote and the need for candidates to appeal to certain sectors of the American public. Resources indicated significant introduction of functional and novelty items to promote candidates' public image. Focus on public support and Jacksons ability to manipulate new techniques allowed him to win the 1828 election. Jacksons emphasis on being personally relatable was a major deviation toward campaigning for support of average Americans instead of support of the Electoral College and elite society. This was successful because of the recent unpopular election of Adams by the Electoral College in contradiction to the popular vote. Accumulated circumstances of the time triggered escalated campaigning and formation of new public-focused strategies which permanently altered political campaigning in the United States.
  • Title: Julius Caesar: Dictator, King, or Emperor
    Student: John Penuel
    Faculty mentor: Kevin Birch
    Type: Oral Presentation
    Time: 3:20-3:35
    Session: 2C Worldly
    Location: HS 111 HS111

    This thesis examines the role of Julius Caesar as the head of the Roman state as to whether or not he should be considered the first Roman Emperor. Modern scholars believe by overall consensus that Augustus, not Caesar, was the first emperor; however the title emperor did not exist in the first centuries B.C.E. and C.E. The concept of the Roman Emperor is a modern construction. The argument is an important one in that an examination of whether Caesar should be considered the first emperor sheds light on the extent to which Augustus depended on and borrowed from the power structures initiated by Caesar, including succession, cloaked monarchy in the guise of the Republic and the imperial cult. The title Imperator may have not made Caesar emperor, but his power did. He planned out a succession through Octavian; he built the Forum Iulium, inspired the Imperial Cult, and his government and the principate were similar. They both were based on control of the military and the complete control of the law. Julius Caesar used his dictatorship like Augustus used the principate as a cloaked monarchy, a monarchy under the guise of the Republic, though Caesars power may have been under the guise of a republican dictator, while Augustus was under the title Princeps, the title of Roman Emperor.
  • Title: Intramolecular Cyclization Reactions and the Synthesis of Pestacin
    Student: Nick Perry
    Faculty mentor: Seth Friese
    Type: Oral Presentation
    Time: 1:50-2:05
    Session: 1B Reaction
    Location: HS 109 HS109

    Intramolecular Cyclization Reactions and the Synthesis of Pestacin Nick Perry, Department of Chemistry Advisors: Dr. Seth Friese, Dr. Stephen Habay The synthesis of pestacin, a 1,3-dihydroisobenzofuran isolated from the fungus Pestalotiopsis microspora, has attracted interest from the scientific community for the compounds potential antifungal, antiviral, and anti-cancer properties (1). The complete synthesis of pestacin has so far eluded chemists (2). Our research group has sought to investigate ICRs as they apply to pestacin synthesis. Analogous compounds, called alkylbromo-phenyl ketones (APKs) were synthesized to model the key step in pestacin synthesis. APKs were subjected to various nucleophiles under various reaction conditions to gain a scope of what worked well and what worked poorly. It was found that small nucleophiles work better than bulky ones, and an increased length of the alkyl chain in APK results in a greater activation barrier that must be overcome by performing the reaction under reflux conditions. Recently, the endeavor of the research group has evolved into making an attempt at synthesizing pestacin. A multi-step synthesis has been planned, and we are making progress. As expected, there have been some challenges that have prompted us to rework our synthesis strategy. The results of ICR investigation, as well as the challenges faced and progress made on synthesis of pestacin will be presented. References 1. Harper, J.K.; Arif, A.M.; Ford, E.J.; Strobel, G.A.; Porco, J.A.; Tomer, D.P.; Oneill, K.L.; Heider, E.M.; Grant, D.M.; Tetrahedron 2003, 59(14), 2471-2476 2. Karmakar, R.; Pahari, P.; Mal, D.; Tetra. Lett. 2009, 50(28), 4042-4045
  • Title: Speaking a lot and saying little: Rhetoric of the State of the Union
    Student: John Plinke
    Faculty mentor: Elizabeth Curtin
    Type: Oral Presentation
    Time: 3:40-3:55
    Session: 2B Politics
    Location: HS 109 HS109

    The State of the Union Address is required by Article two Section three of the United State Constitution; the President shall from time to time give to Congress information of the State of the Union and recommend to their Consideration such measures as he shall judge necessary and expedient. This mandate creates two requirements. In the address the President must report on the current condition of the country as well as make policy suggestions to congress. These requirements imply a certain level of content variety in the address from year to year. Counter-intuitively, each year the president covers the same issues in nearly the same way, while championing very few issues. Political scholars suggest that due to the polarizing nature of his office, the President has active motivation not to state the bulk of his policy agenda before a public forum. Further compounding this is a motivation to only report good news in a hope to keep approval ratings high. This research investigates the State of the Union Addresses since 1982 in order to determine if the address meaningfully fulfills its purpose and possesses substantial variety between years. The demands of the office and common belief imply only stylistic differences year to year in the State of the Union address, yet clearly the actual diction of the address differs between years. I investigate each speech, comparing speeches within presidencies as well as across presidencies, taking into account modern events as well as cyclical and systemic changes across the presidencies.
  • Title: The Unfortunate Shortcomings of the Second Italian-Ethiopian War: A Precursor to the Realities of the United Nations
    Student: Adam Rudy
    Faculty mentor: Joseph Venosa
    Type: Oral Presentation
    Time: 4:00-4:15
    Session: 2C Worldly
    Location: HS 111 HS111

    The Second Ethiopian-Italian war truly displays its importance on a world stage when one analyzes the internationals reactions taken. Throughout the conflict Italy led my Mussolini proves to be the outright aggressor of the two nations. They impose on the sovereignty of Ethiopia, the only sovereignty nation aside from Liberia in Africa during that time. The conflict is really Mussolini attempting to flex is nationalistic military muscle to the Italian people and the rest of the world. However one of the aspects of this war that brings on a much larger meaning to the international community deals with the lack of action taken by the League of Nations. The League of Nations proves that it is completely incapable of stopping a major conflict. After examining their actions or lack thereof, in Africa and East Asia, it is clear that the international body that was supposed to prevent war merely acts on the personal interests of the largest countries in the world. Britain and France were very hesitant to do anything to truly uphold the sovereign rights of Ethiopia. As a political historian, it has become readily apparent that this policy of merely acting, or the absence of action from the international community and the United Nations, is due to the interests of the strongest nations in the world. When a smaller, weaker nation needs to appeal to the League of Nations and later the United Nations, their cry to help will only be effectively answered if it is in the interest of the most militarily and economically powerful member states. The structural framework of the groups simply does not allow smaller countries to get a fair answer for their cries for assistant when international crisis arises.
  • Title: Breaking the Screen: The Impact of Gravity's Special Effects
    Student: Emily Rukavina
    Faculty mentor: James Burton
    Type: Oral Presentation
    Time: 4:50-5:05
    Session: 3B Meaning
    Location: HS 109 HS109

    The recent re-emergence of 3D in popular cinema has led many to dismiss the illusion as a marketing gimmick designed to trick gullible audiences into paying more for theater tickets. While there have certainly been many films that use and abuse the novelty of pop-out images, there are a number of films that utilize the 3D illusion to enable a deeper emotional connection between the audience and the narrative. Chief among these is Alfonso Cuaron's 2013 film Gravity. In this paper I will explain the numerous novel techniques created by the filmmakers to enable heightened empathy with the protagonist, the consequences of this shared point of view, and what makes Gravity stand out from its peers. I conclude that Gravity offers new possibilities for film to communicate the complexities of the human condition to audiences.
  • Title: Film Style and the Communication of Meaning in Forrest Gump
    Student: Lindsey Sapp
    Faculty mentor: James Burton
    Type: Oral Presentation
    Time: 5:10-5:25
    Session: 3B Meaning
    Location: HS 109 HS109

    Paramount's 1994 film Forrest Gump has been alternatively dismissed by critics as fundamentally reactionary or as a playfully progressive. Such analyses usually rely on selective interpretations of the film's plot, its character development and motivation, and its representations of the American past. What is often missing from these readings is analysis of the film's grammar impacts upon meaning. In this paper I analyze the filmmakers' manipulation of film style - lighting, camera angles, sound, music etc. - to encourage the audience to re-experience key events from the 1950s-1970s and what they mean. Through analyses of key scenes from the film, I take issue with various critical interpretations of the films and I conclude that the film works to encourage contradictory feelings and complex meanings of the events it represents.
  • Title: A Statistical Analysis of Common Football Axioms
    Student: Jeffrey Shiderly
    Faculty mentor: Lori Carmack
    Type: Oral Presentation
    Time: 1:50-2:05
    Session: 1D Competition
    Location: HS 113 HS113

    I attempted to determine what variables are most important in the number of wins an NFL team accumulates over a season. In doing so I tested commonly held football beliefs, such as needing a balanced offense to enjoy team success, with linear regression analyses. I found that many common football axioms repeated by sports commentators and writers are not as important as they insist. In my talk, I will present my findings including a five variable linear model that predicts a teams number of wins in an NFL season.
  • Title: Change in Dung Beetle Communities Across Seven Counties of Maryland's Eastern Shore
    Student: Patrick Simons
    Faculty mentor: Dana Price
    Type: Oral Presentation
    Time: 3:00-3:15
    Session: 2E Habitats
    Location: HS 211 HS211

    Dung beetles (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae and Geotrupidae) are vital members of Maryland's Eastern Shore ecosystem, as well as being excellent measures of biodiversity. Since dung beetles are often highly sensitive to habitat fragmentation and disruption, creation of a baseline database of dung beetle communities in Maryland is a must. This research will conduct a second bioinventory of seven counties on Maryland's Eastern Shore, vastly improving our current knowledge of dung beetle populations and adding to the ongoing identification guide of Maryland's scarabs. I will use 200 m pitfall transects to gain a better understanding of dung beetle biodiversity and natural history. I will also collect data on soil structure, common forest flora, and mammal diversity to gain insight on Maryland's dung beetle ecology.
  • Title: Can the Past Predict the Future?: The Xbox One and PlayStation 4
    Student: Matthew Soellner
    Faculty mentor: James Burton
    Type: Oral Presentation
    Time: 1:30-1:45
    Session: 1D Competition
    Location: HS 113 HS113

    My paper focuses on the changing video game market, specifically the release of Microsofts new Xbox One and Sonys PlayStation 4 in November 2013. In order to predict the fate of these consoles commercially, this paper goes back to the past and examines how different video game consoles with different levels of remediation performed commercially. I then examine the pre-release controversy that Microsoft endured following its announcement that the new Xbox would initially be limited to online connectivity and digital rights management fees, while Sony were able to successfully cultivate fan expectations (for once). Further, I will present a speculative regression model that I constructed based on consoles and games sales figures to predict the commercial success of the companys consoles. Ultimately, I conclude that an examination of previous console launches and the debates surrounding them does help predict the future.
  • Title: I understand what you're saying, but I don't want to believe you: The influence of personality on interpersonal interaction.
    Student: Christopher Stockus
    Faculty mentor: Mark Walter
    Type: Oral Presentation
    Time: 3:00-3:15
    Session: 2D Recall
    Location: HS 113 HS 113

    This paper analyzes the relationship between Social Dominance Orientation (SDO) and the correspondence bias. SDO is a measure of an individuals favor for a hierarchical model of social distribution as opposed to equality for all; the correspondence bias is the tendency for individuals to attribute the behavior of others internally as opposed to externally. Sixty-one college students were sampled from an introductory psychology class pool and were randomly assigned to condition to investigate the relationship between these variables. This study hypothesized that high-SDO individuals will be more likely to make correspondent inferences than low-SDO individuals when presented with a controversial topic that they agree with as opposed to when they are presented with a controversial topic that they disagree with (e.g., anti-affirmative action and pro-affirmative action as two experimental conditions, respectively). It was anticipated that the frequency with which high-SDO individuals make correspondent inferences when presented with a non-controversial topic like mandatory history of psychology courses for undergraduates (pro- or anti- as two conditions) would be so inconsequential that the topic would best serve as two innocuous control conditions. This was hypothesized due to Western societies tendency to adopt a free will as opposed to a situational view of determinism. Additionally, high-SDO individuals use free will ideology as a legitimizing myth to rationalize their prejudiced views and unfavorable attitudes toward minority advancing policies. Contrary to what was hypothesized, high-SDO individuals did not make correspondent inferences when presented with a topic that they agree with; this is due to the fact that participants were employing politically correct responses. This research provides new evidence regarding the relationship between SDO and the correspondence bias, where previously no research was available. More research needs to be conducted with community samples to further investigate the relationship between these two personality variables.
  • Title: Stress and growth rates of Arctic charr at different growth temperatures as assessed by changes in the activities of metabolic enzymes
    Student: Alexander Stuffer
    Faculty mentor: Eugene Williams
    Type: Oral Presentation
    Time: 3:40-3:55
    Session: 2F Agua
    Location: HS 243 HS243

    The Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus) is a salmonid species that is farmed extensively in the Northern hemisphere, and prominently in Iceland. Research into ways to improve both the quality and the production of Arctic charr for human consumption are continuing because of the markets importance in the Icelandic economy. Culture temperature is a common factor that is studied to maximize the growth rates of numerous fish species. Culture temperatures above or below a critical optimum leads to increased stress (broadly defined), which can constrain growth. We propose a novel way to measure the levels of stress in fish caused by non-optimal culture temperatures. We will measure the activities of several metabolic enzymes, namely lactate dehydrogenase, succinate dehydrogenase, citrate synthase and cytochrome c oxidase. The activity of these enzymes are known to change during long term temperature acclimation and we hypothesize that these changes will provide a sensitive means of assessing overall stress levels. Samples of Arctic charr tissue will be collected from fish grown for four weeks at five different temperatures (carried out by our colleagues in Iceland) and subsequently analyzed for enzyme activity using establish protocols. Maximal and minimal activities correlate with maximal growth rates (determined by our colleagues in Iceland) and therefore minimal stress levels. These data will add to current concepts and practices and help the Arctic charr aquaculture community determine optimal production temperatures.
  • Title: Wives Earning More than Their Husbands
    Student: Karen Suckling
    Faculty mentor: Hong Yao
    Type: Oral Presentation
    Time: 1:30-1:45
    Session: 1C Perceptions
    Location: HS 111 HS111

    In recent years there has been an increase in the percentage of wives who earn more than their husbands. This paper intends to find the factors that have led to this increase using data provided by the Bureau of Labor Statistics and The Current Population Survey from 1987 to 2006. It empirically investigates the factors that potentially caused the increase in the percent of wives who earn more than their husbands. A series of regressions were then run to test the variables affecting the percent of women who earn more than their husbands. Results indicated that the increase can be explained by the increase in labor force participation in women, the decrease in the labor force participation of men, and the increase in womens wages as a percent of mens wages in todays dollars.
  • Title: Do It Yourself: Todays Counterculture
    Student: Katelyn Tashliski
    Faculty mentor: Sarah Surak
    Type: Oral Presentation
    Time: 4:30-4:45
    Session: 3D Current
    Location: HS 113 HS113

    This paper explores the rise of Do It Yourself projects as a reaction to popular culture. Mass-produced items that can fulfill any purpose or need at a low and convenient price overwhelm todays society. However, since the 2000s we are seeing a new alternative to this mass-produced society. Do It Yourself, or DIY, is a sustainable counterculture sweeping the nation alongside up cycling. Up-cycling and transforming old items into new uses is another large part of the DIY culture. Through up-cycling old items in the home, many people are turning away from the expensive consumerist society, and towards a more personal and unique lifestyle by doing things themselves. The emergence of this sustainable culture has the ability to set a powerful trend and change the behaviors of current Americans. Currently, DIY is gaining support from television shows, social media sites, and many other influential sources. DIY offers the individual much more than the current form of consumption can. Not only is doing things yourself cheaper, but also there is a sense of pride also born within the project. This presentation will educate the audience on the principles of DIY culture, including approachable methods to integrate DIY into their current lifestyle. This presentation will also explain how a widespread DIY society could also lead to significant environmental preservation around the world. Do It Yourself: Todays Counterculture, can re-educate our society and eliminate dependency on mass-produced items.
  • Title: Aerial Shooting in Alaska: War on Wolves?
    Student: Victoria Turner
    Faculty mentor: Sarah Surak
    Type: Oral Presentation
    Time: 2:30-2:45
    Session: 1E Animalia
    Location: HS 211 HS211

    Wolves; they contain all of the raw majesty and mystery of nature itself, and for generations that mystery has been the very origin of our fascination for these creatures, and also our fear. Has this long standing human fear trickled down and transformed into hatred? In 2003 that hatred may have manifested itself in the form of an approved plan by the Alaska Department of Fish and Game. Aerial wolf shooting was officially legalized in the state, allowing hunters to use helicopters to snipe wolves for the first time in over thirty years. Alaskas Department of Fish and Game explained that their reasoning behind the aerial shooting plan was a perceived increase in wolves and an abrupt decrease in caribou, making for an unstable prey population. Political, scientific, and moral controversy erupted over the plan, and Alaska became divided as the war for and against the wolves raged. Yet the entire debate begs the question: what is the truth? Has the wolf population really affected the caribou as much as is being portrayed, or is this the new war on wolves that may wipe them clean from Alaskas ecosystem? With the controversy so heated, it is nearly impossible to find unbiased or skewed information on the wolf and caribou populations. Instead by directly comparing the prey population to the predator population over time (with particular examination of the year 2003 when aerial shooting was permitted), we can ascertain how much the wolves have had an impact on the caribou in the past, and whether or not the implementation of aerial shooting has improved the caribou herd population for the future. For the wolves that roam free in the unforgiving tundra of Alaska, there are more deadly things to fear than natures cold grip, and their eyes remain on the skies.
  • Title: Determining antibacterial effects of plant-derived spices
    Student: Melanie Weaver
    Faculty mentor: Elizabeth Emmert
    Type: Oral Presentation
    Time: 1:50-2:05
    Session: 1A Microbial
    Location: HS 103 HS103

    Spices obtained from plants have been used in food preparation since before the first written recipes, especially in warm equatorial cultures. While used in modern cooking to increase palatability, spices have been found to serve another purpose: prevention of food-borne illness caused by bacteria. Inhibition of bacterial growth is observed in such spices as oregano, cinnamon, ginger, thyme, black pepper, cloves, and tarragon, to name a few. This study examines the degree of inhibition experienced by six bacterial strainsthree gram positive and three gram negativefrom essential oils and extracts of the seven botanical spices mentioned. All tests were performed in TSA plates using the disc diffusion method, and zones of inhibition were measured by diameter after 24 hours of incubation. Extracts from dry spices were created in concentrations of 10, 100, and 1000μg/mL. Discs coated in dry spice were also included, as were discs saturated in essential oils. Inhibition from the essential oils was very significant, though the extracts and dry spice tests resulted in little to no inhibition.
  • Title: The Journey to Early Italian Opera
    Student: Taylor Wentworth
    Faculty mentor: Paul Pfeiffer
    Type: Oral Presentation
    Time:
    Session:  
    Location:

  • Title: Fighting the Battle: The Impact of Queer Teen Suicide in the Media
    Student: Thomas Williams
    Faculty mentor: Bryan Horikami
    Type: Oral Presentation
    Time: 3:00-3:15
    Session: 2A Behavior
    Location: HS 103 HS103

    Suicide, what is it? Who does it pertain to? Who does it affect? It is a serious public health problem that affects everyone, even young people. According to the Center for Disease Control (CDC) suicide is the third leading cause of death among 15-24 year olds and the fourth leading cause of death among youth ages 5-14 years (Fox News, 2012). Studies show that 90% of teens that commit suicide suffer from some type of mental health problem, such as depression, anxiety, drug or alcohol abuse, or a behavior problem (Fox News, 2012). This paper will focus on the news media and how they represent queer teen suicide, focusing on Aiden Rivera Schaeff, Jadin Bell, and Jamey Rodemeyer. How their stories can ignite change through the usage for news media.
  • Title: Identification and Characterization of WDR48 Mutants in Arabidopsis thaliana
    Student: Heather Yerecic
    Faculty mentor: Patti Erickson
    Type: Oral Presentation
    Time: 5:30-5:45
    Session: 3E Identification
    Location: HS 211 HS211

    Deubiquitinase is an enzyme that removes ubiquitin from proteins that were otherwise targeted for degradation. Its regulation, however, is not completely understood. In humans, the deubiquitinase USP46 is regulated by WDR48, which is a WD40 repeat protein. Homologous genes, UBP3 and WDR48 respectively, have been identified in the plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Reverse genetics is being used to understand the function of WDR48. Plants with insertional knockout mutations for WDR48, as well as several other genes encoding proteins shown to interact with WDR48 in the yeast two-hybrid system, will be utilized for phenotypic analysis. Plants containing the insertional knockout of WDR48 have been backcrossed to the wild-type parental line to eliminate any mutations that were not at the desired locus. Phenotypic analysis of homozygous mutants will help elucidate the function of WDR48 in vivo and allow the exploration of its role in deubiquitination regulation.
  • Title: Relationship Aggression on College Campuses
    Student: Rebecca Zimmerman
    Faculty mentor: Timothy Dunn
    Type: Oral Presentation
    Time:
    Session:  
    Location: