Office of the President
Holloway Hall

Marking a Decade of Distinction: 2000-2010

Decade of Distinction

When Salisbury University President Janet Dudley-Eshbach arrived in 2000, she found, in her words, "an extremely healthy institution with a strong cadre of senior faculty and staff." At the executive level, however, she was the fifth president in five years to occupy the Holloway Hall office. Since then, the stability and strength of her leadership and her steadfast vision have helped the campus to advance in often challenging economic times. Below are selected highlights celebrating a decade of achievement by students, faculty, staff, alumni and University friends.

Academic Programs 

Thanks to the hard work of many, particularly faculty, SU added several new majors in the past decade: athletic training, conflict analysis and dispute resolution (CADR), earth science, Teaching English for Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL), environmental studies, exercise science, finance, interdisciplinary studies, international studies, management and marketing. The campus also developed master’s degrees in applied biology, CADR, GIS management, mathematics education, reading and social work. Growing academic partnerships include statewide distance/satellite learning sites for business, social work, elementary education and respiratory therapy. Salisbury Abroad programs were established in Ecuador, Estonia and China. A planned doctorate, SU’s first, in nursing practice will help meet needs in Maryland and beyond.

Rankings & Accolades

Consistently among the nation’s best, SU has been one of U.S. News & World Report’s Top Public Universities for 14 consecutive years and The Princeton Review’s Best Colleges for 12 consecutive years. Twice SU earned kudos as one of the nation’s Top 50 and Top 100 “Best Value” Public Colleges from The Princeton Review/USA Today and Kiplinger’s Personal Finance, respectively. The Princeton Review also ranked SU among the “greenest” colleges in the U.S. The past two years, The Chronicle of Higher Education named SU a “Great College To Work For.” The President is a three-time Maryland’s Top 100 Women honoree, recently inducted into The Daily Record’s Circle of Excellence. Nationally, she was elected to the AASCU Board of Directors, also serving as its representative to the ACE board.

Campus Development

Since 2000, campus grounds have expanded nearly 20 percent, accommodating a student population that has grown by 2,000. Among facilities that opened are Scarborough Student Leader-ship Center, University Park, University Fitness Club and SU’s first parking garage. The Route 13 skyline—and academic opportunities—changed dramatically with two award-winning buildings: Henson Science Hall and the LEED Silver-certified Teacher Education and Technology Center. In addition, construction is advancing on the new Perdue School of Business building and the Sea Gull Square residence-retail complex.

New Initiatives

Part of Dudley-Eshbach’s vision for SU was a more diverse, international and inclusive campus, and better relations with the surrounding community. The past decade has brought successes in both. For example, SU’s minority student headcount more than doubled, and an increasing number of diverse faculty and staff serve as mentors and leaders. A thriving Center for International Education allows students to study abroad and brings global perspectives to campus. Shared governance gives all voices across campus an opportunity to be heard. In addition, the creation of a Town-Gown Council and Volunteer Center has helped strengthen community partnerships. Students annually embrace University neighbors during the SGA’s Big Event and We Love Salisbury cleanup days.

Art & Culture

From concerts by the Salisbury Symphony Orchestra (now celebrating its 25th season) to beautiful exhibits at the Ward Museum of Wildfowl Art, the campus is a cultural center for the Lower Eastern Shore. Humanities seminars and Learn With SU provide opportunities for lifelong learning. The decade’s highlights include three residencies with Tibetan monks, PACE-sponsored visits by national leaders, and lectures by Nobel Peace Prizewinning presidents F.W. de Klerk of South Africa and Lech Walesa of Poland.

Philanthropy

Launched in 2006, the SU Foundation’s Taking Excellence to New Heights campaign surpassed its original goal and raised more than $35.5 million to date for the University. The last decade saw the two largest gifts in SU history: $8 million from the Arthur W. Perdue Foundation for the new business school building and $5.3 million from the Lucy Tull estate for the Nursing Department. Other major gifts have increased endowments for the Seidel School, Salisbury Symphony Orchestra and scholarships, including one for disabled graduate students.

Athletics & Fitness

In 2005, Men’s Fitness named SU the 15th fittest campus in the U.S.—no surprise to many at this University “on the move.” In the past decade, the Sea Gulls excelled on the field and off: Field hockey and men’s and women’s lacrosse earned 10 NCAA Division III national championships and some 18 scholar-athletes were national Academic All-Americans. Home to one of the country’s Top 10 Division III athletics programs, SU also encourages community wellness through Healthy U of Delmarva.

Student-Centeredness

Dudley-Eshbach has consistently supported the faculty and staff’s commitment to student success. Some memories include: Academically, hosting NCUR 2008 (SU was the first comprehensive university in the country to do so twice); civically, watching the student-organized Relay For Life grow and raise more than $700,000 for the American Cancer Society; and socially, building a “Sammy the Snow Gull” sculpture with students during unexpected winter blizzards. All provided smiles. More recently, the president traveled with faculty and students to central Mexico for a spring break global service project and watched SU’s largest graduating class of 1,477 walk across the stage. They received diplomas from a campus that has earned its reputation as A Maryland University of National Distinction.