Perdue School of Business
Perdue Hall

Perdue Hall Ribbon-Cutting

Stormy weather did not dampen spirits inside Perdue Hall Thursday as Salisbury University celebrated the grand opening of its newest academic building. President Janet Dudley-Eshbach welcomed Perdue Farms Chairman Jim Perdue and other members of the Perdue family, Maryland Governor Martin O’Malley, Delegate and SU alumnus Norman H. Conway, and well-wishers from the community.

"Perdue Hall is truly a state-of-the-art facility," said Dudley-Eshbach. "...Frank Perdue was a visionary, and I think he would approve.” O’Malley described the late entrepreneur as "a force of nature, and nowhere more so than on this campus."

Jim Perdue said his father would be proud of Perdue School accomplishments. “Just as my grandfather started the company on a solid foundation in 1920, this school really has a solid foundation for business education on Delmarva,” he added.

The Arthur W. Perdue Foundation donated $8 million for the building, the largest gift for a capital project in SU history. For the ribbon-cutting, the beautiful Atrium was packed. Dignitaries praised the partnership which made the $55 million structure possible. Afterward guests enjoyed a reception and tours including the unveiling of the Franklin P. Perdue Museum of Business and Entrepreneurship, one of the few campus-based museums devoted to business nationwide, said University archivist David Ranzan.

With some $3.1 million in new technology, the traditional academic exterior houses the latest resources for students and faculty. Dean Bob Wood said: "Finally, we have a facility that supports our high-quality programs and growing reputation as a provider of business education."

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