Home Feedback Search

HERBS

Aloe
Bilberry
Black Cohash
Chamomile
Chaste Berry Tree
Dong Quai
Echinacea
Evening Primrose Oil
Feverfew
Garlic
Ginger
Gingko
Ginseng
Guarana
Hawthorn
Horse Chestnut
Kava-Kava
Ma Huang
Milk Thistle
Nettle
St. John's Wort
Saw Palmetto
Tea Tree Oil
Valerian
Yohimbe 

 

 

Ginkgo
(Ginkgo biloba, Maidenhair tree)                
                                               

General Description:  Deciduous tree that produces a flower and a fruit that can live up to 1,000 years. 

Part Used:  Leaf

Uses:      

   improve memory, concentration

  AD/HD individuals

  improve circulation especially in diabetics

   SSRI-induced impotency    

   alzheimer’s disease       

   asthma

   antioxidant

  hearing problems

Action:  Contains a variety of flavonoids, terpenoids, and phenolic acids.  These produce platelet activating antgonist, bronchoconstriction, antioxidants, vasodilator, and  increases cerebral blood flow.

Dosage: 

120-160 mg daily. (May take 1-2 months to be effective)

240 mg daily for azheimers

60mg twice/day to 240mg twice daily for sexual function.

0.5 ml of 1:5 tincture of leaf 3 times daily

Precautions/Adverse Effects: Well tolerated with rare, GI symptoms,     headaches, and vertigo.  Ginkgo fruit and seeds are toxic if ingested.  Skin contact can produce dermatits.

Use cautiously with anticoagulants. (warfarin, aspirin, NSAIDs)

One study reported bleeding into the eye and another reported a spontaneous subdural hematoma.  

Contraindications:  Ginkgo allergy.  Avoid using in pregnancy, lactation and children, due to insufficient information.

Nursing Considerations:  

       Warn patients that concomitant use with some herbs that have coumarin constituents can affect platelet aggregation and increase the risk of bleeding:  angelica, chamomile, feverfew, garlic, ginger, horse chestnut and others.  

            Especially in the elderly who  may be on anticoagulants and seek the benefits of gingko.                  

      Warn patients who are on MAOIs that ginkgo can potentate their activity.

           Limit ingestion of tyramine foods (cheeses, red wine) or sympathomimetic agents.   

      Warn patients that ginkgo is not a bronchodilator and is not a quick relief medication.  Will not work in an acute attack.

The precise mechanism of action is unclear, but current research studies are encouraging.  There are several studies involving animals ongoing with respect to cognitive and neuroprotective effects.

(References)

   

Aloe ] Bilberry ] Black Cohash ] Chamomile ] Chaste Berry Tree ] Dong Quai ] Echinacea ] Evening Primrose Oil ] Feverfew ] Garlic ] Ginger ] [ Ginkgo ] Ginseng ] Guarana ] Hawthorn ] Horse Chestnut ] Kava-Kava ] Ma Huang ] Milk Thistle ] Nettle ] St. John's Wort ] Saw Palmetto ] Tea Tree Oil ] Valerian ] Yohimbe ]