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HERBS

Aloe
Bilberry
Black Cohash
Chamomile
Chaste Berry Tree
Dong Quai
Echinacea
Evening Primrose Oil
Feverfew
Garlic
Ginger
Gingko
Ginseng
Guarana
Hawthorn
Horse Chestnut
Kava-Kava
Ma Huang
Milk Thistle
Nettle
St. John's Wort
Saw Palmetto
Tea Tree Oil
Valerian
Yohimbe 

 

 

 Evening Primrose Oil
 (enothera biennis)

General Description:  A biennial herb that grows wild in parts of North America and Europe.

Part Used:  oil from the seeds

Uses:   

  reduces risk of cardiovascular diseases   

  lowers cholesterol and triglycerides

  decrease platelet aggregation (only in animal studies)

  PMS (no clinical evidence to support) 

  breast tenderness        

  rheumatoid arthritis (only after 6 months of use) 

  dermatitis (Conflicting studies)

  peripheral neuropathy in diabetics

 cervical ripening and in place of Pitocin stimulating labor.    (Has  not been studied well)                        

Action:  High concentrations of cis-linoleic and cis-gammalinolenic acid (GLA) when converted to DGLA (dihomo-gramma-linolenic acid) causes a release of arachidonic acid. Decreases the production of series 2 prostaglandins and leukotrienes.

Dosage: 

.6 6 g. Daily  

1g for atopic eczema bid

Precautions/Adverse Effects:  few side effects, however, can produce nausea, headache, GI upset. Use cautiously in  pregnancy.  Can cause an increased incidence of prolonged rupture of membranes, arrest of descent, and vaccum.

Contraindications:  Pregnancy/lactating.  Schizophrenic patients taking epileptogenic drugs.

Nursing Considerations:                             

  Inform patients that because linoleic and gammalinolenic are polyunsaturated fatty acids, they are subject to oxidation and should be stored properly and can be checked by smelling or tasting for bitterness. 

  Caution patients when taking phenothiazine drugs, they can reduce seizure threshold, could cause increase risk of temporal lobe epilepsy.  

  Caution parents to use this herb for a hyperactive child only under supervision of a health care provider.

  A 3 month treatment may be needed to achieve clinical response.

(References)

Aloe ] Bilberry ] Black Cohash ] Chamomile ] Chaste Berry Tree ] Dong Quai ] Echinacea ] [ Evening Primrose Oil ] Feverfew ] Garlic ] Ginger ] Ginkgo ] Ginseng ] Guarana ] Hawthorn ] Horse Chestnut ] Kava-Kava ] Ma Huang ] Milk Thistle ] Nettle ] St. John's Wort ] Saw Palmetto ] Tea Tree Oil ] Valerian ] Yohimbe ]