Mathematics
& Computer Science

 

Henson Science Hall
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COSC 116 INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER SYSTEMS [+]
Overview of computer science and the theory and application of computer fundamentals. Lab activities include: file and directory/folder manipulation, word processing, spreadsheets and program implementation. May not be taken for credit if student already has credit for any of the following: COSC 110, 112, 115, INFO 111. Three hours lecture, two hours lab per week. Meets General Education IVB (Prior to Fall 2008: IIIB).
COSC 117 PROGRAMMING FUNDAMENTALS [+]
Introductory course in computer programming, which involves solving problems by designing, implementing and testing algorithms. Emphasis is on problem solving through the use of algorithms and learning to develop computer programs that are reliable, well-documented, and correct. Implementation is done in object-oriented based languages concentrating on fundamental instructions and the development and implementation of events, methods, and functions. Three hours lecture, two hours lab per week. Meets General Education IVB (Prior to Fall 2008: IIIB).
COSC 118 INTRODUCTORY SCIENTIFIC PROGRAMMING [+]
Introduction to program design and development. Programs focus on development of applications for science including applications related to GIS. The object-oriented approach is emphasized throughout. No previous programming experience is required. Three hours lecture, two hours lab per week.
COSC 119 INTRODUCTION TO WEB DEVELOPMENT [+]
Introductory course in Web development through the use of XHTML (Extensible Hypertext Markup Language), CSS (Cascading Style Sheets) and JavaScript. Intended for B.A. art majors in visual communications and B.F.A. art majors in graphic design. Labs focus on Web page development through the use of forms, tables, menus, graphics and JavaScript. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week. Meets General Education IVB (Prior to Fall 2008: IIIB).
COSC 120 COMPUTER SCIENCE I [+]
Step-by-step approach to problem solving, modular structured design, and structured programming in C++. Emphasizes production of readable, well documented, efficient, tested and correct programs. Includes time intensive assignments. Prerequisite: C or better in COSC 117 or permission of department. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week.
COSC 220 COMPUTER SCIENCE II [+]
Object-oriented approach to design and implementation of medium to large software projects. Abstract data types including lists, stack and queues. Emphasizes design trade-offs based on analysis of run time and storage requirements. Includes time-intensive assignments. Prerequisite: COSC 120. Pre or Corequisite: MATH 210. Three hours lecture, two hours lab per week. Meets General Education IVB (Prior to Fall 2008: IIIB).
COSC 250 MICROCOMPUTER ORGANIZATION [+]
Organization and internal behavior of microcomputer hardware: digital logic, Boolean algebra, switching networks, design of memories and ALUs, controllers, microprocessor architecture, introduction to machine code and assembly language. Credit may not be received for both COSC 250 and PHYS 322. Prerequisite: COSC 116 or 120. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week. Meets General Education IVB (Prior to Fall 2008: IIIB).
COSC 320 ADVANCED DATA STRUCTURES AND ALGORYTHM ANALYSIS [+]
A continuation of the study of the design, implementation and testing of programs. Further study of object-oriented programming. Introduction to graphical user interfaces. Emphasis is on analysis of algorithms and abstraction. Prerequisites: COSC 220, MATH 210. Three hours lecture, two hours lab per week.
COSC 330 OO DESIGN PATTERNS AND GUI/EVENT-DRIVEN PROGRAMMING [+]
Covers three related topics: event-driven programming, graphical user interface (GUI), and object-oriented (OO) design using design patterns. The event-driven model is examined throughout the course. OO design is introduced through the analysis of design patterns. There are several programming projects for this course. Prerequisite: C or better in COSC 220. Three hours per week.
COSC 350 SYSTEMS SOFTWARE [+]
Study of programming at the systems level, mostly in a UNIX environment. Topics include processes, threads, sockets, basic I/O operations interprocess communication and use of Shell and Perl scripts. Prerequisites: COSC 220 and 250. Three hours lecture, two hours lab per week.
COSC 362 THEORY OF COMPUTATION [+]
Applications of discrete mathematics to computer science and introduction to the theory of computation. Topics include automata and formal languages, computability by Turing machines and recursive functions, undecidability and computational complexity. Prerequisite: C or better in COSC 120, MATH 210. Three hours per week.
COSC 370 COMPUTER NETWORKS [+]
Theory and practice of data communication between computing devices. Investigates network architectures, wide- and local-area networks, ISO network layers. Emphasis is on the underlying theory and how network design affects network performance. Study of encoding systems, routing control, transport protocols, programming for networks, socket programming and remote procedure calls. Prerequisites: C or better in MATH 210 and COSC 220. Three hours per week.
COSC 380 INTERNSHIP [+]
Students work under supervisors in a local firm or public institution in conjunction with an advisor from the department. Cross-listed with MATH 380. MATH/COSC 380 may be taken twice for a maximum of six credits, but used only once toward a major in mathematics or computer science. Prerequisite: Approval of department chair. Eight to ten hours per week. (P/F)
COSC 385 DIRECTED STUDY [+]
For students who desire to pursue a special topic in computer science not covered in the current curriculum. Under most circumstances students will take this course for three credit hours. This course may be repeated under different subtitles for a total of nine credits, but only a total of four credit hours from MATH 385 and /or COSC 385 may be used toward a major or minor. Prerequisite: Consent of the intructor and Chair of the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science. One to four hours per week.
COSC 386 DATABASE IMPLEMENTATION [+]
Concentrates on the physical design and implementation of databases. Query algorithms and efficiency optimization will be explored. Students will design, implement and document large database systems. Prerequisites: COSC 220 and MATH 210. Three hours per week.
COSC 390 UNDERGRAD RESEARCH PROJECT [+]
Offers study of some area of computer science in more depth than is possible in the usual classroom setting. Students work on projects under the direction of faculty members. Prerequisite: Department approval. (P/F)
COSC 422 ORGANIZATION OF PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES [+]
Study of the organization of programming languages, with emphasis on their formal specifications and on the run-time behavior of procedural, object-based, functional and logic programming languages. History, syntax and grammars, control, binding, pointers, blocks, parameters, and encapsulation. May be offered for undergraduate or graduate credit. Prerequisite: COSC 220. Three hours per week.
COSC 425 SOFTWARE ENGINEERING I [+]
Study of conventional and object-oriented software engineering principles and methods: the human-computer interface, requirements analysis, prototyping, software design, system models, use of tools, project management, implementation, testing strategies, software metrics, maintenance, quality assurance, ethics and professional responsibility. Use of standards, verification and validation, configuration management, quality assurance and human factors. Student teams will analyze a real-world problem and design, implement, document and test a software system based upon the specified requirements. COSC 426 is a continuation of 425. Prerequisite: COSC 320. Three hours per week.
COSC 426 SOFTWARE ENGINEERING II [+]
Study of conventional and object-oriented software engineering principles and methods: the human-computer interface, requirements analysis, prototyping, software design, system models, use of tools, project management, implementation, testing strategies, software metrics, maintenance, quality assurance, ethics and professional responsibility. Use of standards, verification and validation, configuration management, quality assurance and human factors. Student teams will analyze a real-world problem and design, implement, document and test a software system based upon the specified requirements. COSC 426 is a continuation of 425. Prerequisite: COSC 320. Three hours per week.
COSC 432 COMPILER CONSTRUCTION [+]
Concentrates on the principles, techniques and tools of modern compiler construction. Topics include lexical analysis, parsing and semantic analysis, translation, code generation, run-time organization, abstract syntax, type checking, and register allocation. Will design and implement a working compiler. Prerequisite: C or better in COSC 320. Pre- or Co-requisite: C or better in COSC/MATH 362.
COSC 450 OPERATING SYSTEMS [+]
Analysis of the operating system, the program which supervises the activity of the computer. Study of processes, interprocess communication, scheduling, I/O systems, deadlock, file systems, memory management, security/protection mechanisms and resource allocation. May be offered for undergraduate or graduate credit. Prerequisite: COSC 350. Three hours per week.
COSC 456 COMPUTER ARCHITECTURE [+]
Advanced study of computer systems which includes addressing modes, parallelism, pipeline processing, memory management, control designs and I/O interrupts. Various architectures compared and contrasted. Prerequisites: COSC 220 and 250. Three hours per week.
COSC 472 NETWORK SECURITY [+]
The principles and practice of network security, covering three areas: security risks and countermeasures, principles of computer cryptography, and applied cryptography in network systems. Topics include the themes and challenges of network security, the role of cryptography, and modern techniques for computer and network security. Prerequisite: C or better in COSC 370.
COSC 482 COMPUTER GRAPHICS [+]
Generate and manipulate graphic information using the computer. Emphasis on the analysis of fundamental problems associated with these activities and on the structured design of solutions. Cross-listed with MATH 482. Cannot receive credit for both COSC 482 and MATH 482. Prerequisites: C or better in COSC 120, MATH 293 or 306. Three hours per week.
COSC 490 SPECIAL TOPICS [+]
Seminar course with content that varies semester to semester (e.g., artificial intelligence, compiler construction or other topics suggested by faculty or students). May be taken twice under different titles recorded by the registrar. May be offered for undergraduate or graduate credit. Prerequisite: COSC 220. Three hours per week.
COSC 495 DIRECTED CONSULTING [+]
Provides teams of 3-12 students with experience in using mathematical and computing tools to solve real-world problems posed by a client organization, such as a research institute, business or industry. Combines individual and group work, and requires the presentation of a written and oral report to the client organization and the department. Cross-listed with MATH 495. COSC/MATH 495 may be taken twice for a maximum of eight credits, but used only once toward a major in mathematics or computer science. Prerequisite: Invitation by the department. Four hours per week. (P/F)
COSC 501 COMPUTER SCIENCE FOR MATH AND SCIENCE TEACHERS [+]
Study of microcomputers, advanced programming concepts and other topics appropriate to secondary school teachers of mathematics and science. Graduate credit only. Prerequisites: Ability to design and write clear programs; COSC 120.
COSC 550 OPERATING SYSTEMS [+]
Analysis of the operating system, the program which supervises the activity of the computer. Study of processes, interprocess communication, scheduling, I/O systems, deadlock, file systems, memory management, security/protection mechanisms and resource allocation. Credit may not be received for more than one: COSC 450, COSC 550. Prerequisite: COSC 350 graduate standing required. Three hours per week.
COSC 582 COMPUTER GRAPHICS [+]
Generate and manipulate graphic information using the computer. Emphasis on the analysis of fundamental problems associated with these activities and on the structured design of solutions. Cross-listed with MATH 482/582. Credit may not be received for more than one: COSC 482, COSC 582, MATH 482, MATH 582. Prerequisites: COSC 120, MATH 306, graduate standing required. Three hours per week.
COSC 590 SPECIAL TOPICS [+]
Seminar course with content that varies semester to semester (e.g., artificial intelligence, compiler construction or other topics suggested by faculty or students). May be taken twice under different titles recorded by the registrar. Three hours per week.

MATH 101 FINITE MATHEMATICS [+]
Introduction to functions, graphs, linear programming, probability, computing and additional topics as time permits. For students in the behavioral, biological, management and social sciences. Cannot receive credit for both MATH 110 and MATH 101. Prerequisite: High school Algebra II and plane geometry. Three hours per week. Meets General Education IIIB or IIIC.
MATH 105 LIBERAL ARTS MATHEMATICS [+]
Study of the beauty and structure of mathematics, with emphasis on quantitative and analytical reasoning skills. Various areas of mathematics or its applications will be used as a vehicle for this study. Designed for students whose major area of study does not have specific requirements in mathematics. May not receive credit for more than one of MATH 105, MATH 200 and MATH 190. Prerequisites: Three years of high school mathematics including geometry or college-level intermediate algebra. Four hours per week. Meets General Education IVB or IVC (Prior to Fall 2008: IIIB or IIIC).
MATH 130 FUNDAMENTAL CONCEPTS I [+]
For prospective elementary school teachers, the course provides a thorough understanding of the mathematical concepts covered in grades one through eight. Moves through the mathematical content into the ability to explain the mathematical ideas and relationships. Emphasizes the ability to explain the concepts in everyday language appropriate for the listener, using correct vocabulary, and the ability to demonstrate these ideas using physical models and/or activities. Use of technology is required. Includes non-routine problem solving. May not receive credit for both MATH 103 and MATH 130. Three hours per week each. Does not meet General Education requirements.
MATH 135 COLLEGE ALGEBRA: A MODELING APPROACH [+]
A modeling approach to algebraic topics used in problem solving. Topics include equations and functions: polynomial, exponential and logarithmic; graphing and data analysis/modeling. Emphasis on skill development, problem solving, critical thinking, working in teams, use of graphing calculators, and communicating effectively. Credit may not be received for more than one of the following: MATH 100, 135 or 140. Prerequisites: High School Algebra I and II. Three hours per week. Meets General Education Requirement IVB or IVC (Prior to Fall 2008: IIIB or IIIC.
MATH 140 COLLEGE ALGEBRA AND TRIGONOMETRY [+]
Applications-oriented college algebra and trigonometry course for students planning to study science or additional mathematics. Emphasizes computational, qualitative, visual and symbolic approaches. Topics include functions and graphs; exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions; and difference equations. Credit may not be received for more than one of the following: MATH 100, 102, 118, 122, 135, 140. Prerequisite: High school Algebra II and plane geometry. Four hours per week. Meets General Education IVB or IVC (Prior to Fall 2008: IIIB or IIIC).
MATH 144 ENVIRONMENTAL MATHEMATICS [+]
Systems approach to environmental concepts and problems. A principal tool is the Odum diagrammatic systems language, translated into flow equations which are then implemented by computer models. Prerequisite: High school Algebra II and plane geometry. Three hours per week. Meets General Education IVB or IVC (Prior to Fall 2008: IIIB or IIIC).
MATH 150 DATA AND PROBABILITY CONNECTIONS [+]
Provides prospective teachers with a conceptual understanding of statistics and probability. Includes concepts for which elementary curricula lay a foundation, bivariate data analysis, conditional probability, formal inference, relevant educational software, and guidelines for teaching statistics as set forth by the American Statistical Association and the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. May not receive credit for more than one: MATH 150, 151, 155 or 213. Prerequisite or corequisite: MATH 130. Three hours per week. Meets General education IVB or IVC (Prior to Fall 2008: IIIB or IIIC).
MATH 155 MODERN STATISTICS WITH COMPUTER ANALYSIS [+]
Descriptive and inferential analysis of raw data, emphasizing appropriate assumptions, computer use and interpretation. Consideration of parametric and nonparametric methods and comparison of their powers. Intended for students in the social and natural sciences. May not receive credit for more than one: MATH 150, 151, 155 or 213. Prerequisites: High school Algebra II and plane geometry. Three hours per week. Meets General education IVB or IVc (Prior to Fall 2008: IIIB or IIIC).
MATH 160 INTRODUCTION TO APPLIED CALCULUS [+]
Introductory study of differential and integral calculus with emphasis on techniques and applications. For students in the biological, management, social and behavioral sciences. Prerequisite: High school Algebra II and plane geometry. Three hours per week. Meets General Education IVB or IVC (Prior to Fall 2008: IIIB or IIIC).
MATH 198 CALCULUS FOR BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE [+]
Introduction to analytic geometry, limits, continuity, derivatives of elementary functions, applications of derivatives and antiderivatives in a biological context. May not receive credit for both MATH 198 and MATH 201. Prerequisites: MATH 140 or equivalent. Four hours per week. Meets General Education IVB or IVC (Prior to Fall 2008: IIIB or IIIC).
MATH 201 CALCULUS I [+]
Introduction to analytic geometry, limits, continuity, derivatives of elementary functions, applications of the derivatives. May not receive credit for both MATH 198 and MATH 201. Prerequisite: MATH140 or equivalent. Four hours per week. Meets General Education IVB or IVC (Prior to Fall 2008: IIIB or IIIC).
MATH 202 CALCULUS II [+]
Introduction to integrals, infinite series, applications and techniques of integration. Prerequisite: MATH 198 or MATH 201 or equivalent. Four hours per week. Meets General Education IVB or IVC (Prior to Fall 2008: IIIB or IIIC).
MATH 210 INTRODUCTION TO DISCRETE MATHEMATICS [+]
Introduction to basic techniques and modes of reasoning for discrete problem solving. Set theory, recurrence relations, counting, graphs and lattices, number theory. Prerequisites: MATH 140 or equivalent. Four hours per week. Meets General Education IVB or IVC (Prior to Fall 2008: IIIB or IIIC).
MATH 213 STATISTICAL THINKING [+]
Descriptive and inferential analysis of data, emphasizing appropriate assumptions, computer use and interpretation. Parametric and non parametric methods will be compared and contrasted throughout the course. May not receive credit for more than one: MATH 150, 151, 155 or 213. Concurrent registration with MATH 214 is required. Prerequisites or corequisites: MATH 214 and 160 or 201. Three hours per week.
MATH 214 STATISTICS LABORATORY [+]
Laboratory activities to reinforce topics covered in MATH 213. Must be taken during the same semester that students register for MATH 213. Students having completed MATH 155 or equivalent may also take MATH 214. Two hours laboratory per week.
MATH 215 INTRODUCTION TO FINANCIAL MATHEMATICS [+]
An introduction to basic financial mathematics focusing on equivalent rates of interest and their use in discounted cashflow analysis. Topics include: annuities, loans, projects, bonds, duration and convexity, the yield curve, and the fundamentals of financial derivatives such as European call and put options. Prerequisite: MATH 160 or equivalent. Four hours per week.
MATH 230 FUNDAMENTAL CONCEPTS II [+]
Continuation of the process begun in MATH 130 of preparing prospective elementary school teachers to teach mathematics. Like MATH 130, it fosters a thorough understanding of fundamental mathematics and emphasizes the ability to communicate this understanding effectively. Cannot receive credit for both MATH 104 and 230. Prerequisites: MATH 130 completed with a C or better. Three hours per week. Meets General Education IVB or IVC (Prior to Fall 2008: IIIB or IIIC).
MATH 293 LINEAR AND STATISTICAL METHODS FOR COMPUTER SCIENCE [+]
Elements of linear algebra and basic statistics as utilized in computer science: linear systems and matrices, basic probability, and statistical inference. May not receive credit for both MATH?293 and MATH 151, 155, 213 or 306. Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 202 or equivalent. Four hours per week.
MATH 300 INTRODUCTION TO ABSTRACT MATHEMATICS [+]
Designed for students majoring and minoring in mathematics. Students experience the power of mathematical thought and develop facility with mathematical expression, both written and oral. Assignments make use of both inductive and deductive reasoning. Prerequisite: MATH 210 or a course in discrete mathematics with a grade of C or better. Three hours per week.
MATH 306 LINEAR ALGEBRA [+]
Basic concepts of linear algebra: linear equations and matrices, vector spaces and subspaces, similar matrices, basis and dimension, linear transformations, eigenvalues, determinants, orthogonality, coordinate systems, and applications to geometry. Prerequisite: MATH 202. Four hours per week.
MATH 310 CALCULUS III [+]
Arc length, indeterminate forms, Euclidean spaces, functions of several variables, partial differentiation, multiple integrals. Prerequisite: MATH 202. Four hours per week.
MATH 311 DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS I [+]
Solutions of 1st and 2nd order equations and their applications: separable, exact, homogeneous, linear. Numerical and series solutions of ordinary and partial differential equations. Prerequisite: MATH 202. Four hours per week.
MATH 313 SURVEY DESIGN & SAMPLING [+]
Peculiarities of sampling and inference commonly encountered in business, the social sciences and natural resources management. Methods for selecting the sample from an existing population and ways for circumventing various difficulties. Prerequisite: Statistics course. Three hours per week. Meets General Education IVB or IVC (Prior to Fall 2008: IIIB or IIIC).
MATH 314 INTERMEDIATE APPLIED STATISTICS [+]
Optimal allocation of sampling units to treatments in order to provide the highest accuracy and lowest cost. Designs compared and contrasted for advantages and disadvantages. Introduces standard computer packages (SPSS, BMD, Minitab, etc.). Prerequisite: Statistics course. Three hours per week. Meets General Education IVB or IVC (Prior to Fall 2008: IIIB or IIIC).
MATH 380 INTERNSHIP [+]
Students work under supervisors in a local firm or public institution in conjunction with an advisor from the math department. Cross-listed with COSC 380. MATH/COSC 380 may be taken twice for a maximum of six credits, but used only once toward a major in mathematics or computer science. Prerequisite: Approval of department chair. Eight-to-ten hours per week. (P/F)
MATH 385 DIRECTED STUDY [+]
For students who desire to pursue a special topic in mathematics not covered in the current curriculum. Under most circumstances students will take this course for three credit hours. This course may be repeated under different subtitles but only a total of four credit hours from MATH 385 and/or COSC 385 may be used toward a major or minor. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor and chair of the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science. One to four hours per week.
MATH 390 UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH PROJECT [+]
Offers study of some area of the mathematical sciences in more depth than is possible in the usual classroom setting. Students work on a project under the direction of faculty members. Prerequisite: Department chair and research committee approval. (P/F)
MATH 402 THEORY OF NUMBERS [+]
Basic concepts: integers, prime numbers, divisibility, congruencies and residues. May be offered for undergraduate or graduate credit. Prerequisite: MATH 210 and/or 306 (both recommended). Three hours per week. Meets General Education IVB or IVC (Prior to Fall 2008: IIIB or IIIC).
MATH 406 GEOMETRIC STRUCTURES [+]
Axiomatic development of incidence, ordered incidence, affine and absolute geometries; investigation of Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometries. May be offered for undergraduate or graduate credit. Prerequisite: MATH 210. Three hours per week. Meets General Education IVB or IVC (Prior to Fall 2008: IIIB or IIIC).
MATH 411 DESIGN AND ANALYSIS OF EXPERIMENTS [+]
Introduction to ideas of planning and designing statistical experiments involving data collection. Study of various statistical analyses for these designs. Discussion of optimal allocation of sampling units to treatments in order to provide the highest accuracy and lowest cost. Use standard statistical software packages such as Minitab and SPSS. Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 155 or 212, or permission of department. Three hours per week.
MATH 413 MATHEMATICAL STATISTICS I [+]
Axioms and algebra of probability, discrete and continuous random variables, multivariate distributions, limit theorems. May be offered for undergraduate or graduate credit. Prerequisites: MATH 213, 310. Three hours per week.
MATH 414 MATHEMATICAL STATISTICS II [+]
Methods of estimating, properties of estimator, hypothesis testing, linear models, least squares, analysis of variance, enumerative data, nonparametric statistics. May be offered for undergraduate or graduate credit. Prerequisite: MATH 413. Three hours per week.
MATH 415 ACTUARIAL AND FIANANCIAL MODELS [+]
An introduction to models of survival, individual life insurance, and life annuities emphasizing the traditional actuarial functions of determining premiums and reserves from a stochastic point of view. Topics include: multiple life theory, models with expenses, stochastic processes, and the use of binomial models, geometric Brownian motion, and simulation in the study of option pricing. Prerequisites: MATH 215 and MATH 413. Four hours per week.
MATH 430 MATHEMATICAL CONNECTIONS FOR SECONDARY SCHOOL TEACHERS [+]
Connection of the undergraduate mathematics curriculum to the secondary mathematics curriculum by examining high school curriculum topics from an advanced and historical perspective. Contributions from diverse cultures as students examine the historical development of numbers and number systems, algebra, Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometries, calculus, discrete mathematics, statistics, probability, and measurement. Prerequisites: SCED 373 and MATH 441 or MATH 451. Four hours per week.
MATH 441 ABSTRACT ALGEBRA I [+]
Introduction to the theory of groups, rings, integral domains and fields, including basic properties of polynomials. May be offered for undergraduate or graduate credit. Prerequisite: MATH 210 and/or 306 (both recommended). Three hours per week. Meets General Education IVB or IVC (Prior to Fall 2008: IIIB or IIIC).
MATH 442 ABSTRACT ALGEBRA II [+]
Modern abstract algebra including such topics as rings, polynomials and fields. Other topics may include algebraic coding, Boolean algebras, symmetry and mathematical crystallography, applications of finite fields to computer science. Prerequisite: MATH 441. Three hours per week.
MATH 451 ANALYSIS I [+]
Modern abstract analysis including topology of the real number system, sequences, continuity and differentiability. May be offered for undergraduate or graduate credit. Prerequisites: MATH 202, 210. Three hours per week.
MATH 452 ANALYSIS II [+]
Modern abstract analysis including such topics as convergence of infinite series, sequences of functions, metric spaces, integration, topology of the real number system and continuity. Prerequisite: MATH 451. Three hours per week.
MATH 458 COMPLEX ANALYSIS [+]
An introduction to complex variables accessible to juniors and seniors in mathematics and the physical sciences. Topics will include the algebra of the complex number system, analytic functions, contour integrals, elementary functions, sequences, series and residues. More advanced topics may include conformal mapping, the Schwarz-Christoffel transformation, integral formulas of the Poisson type and Riemann surfaces. Prerequisites: MATH 31 and either MATH 210 or PHYS 309. Three hours per week.
MATH 460 OPERATIONS RESEARCH [+]
Introduction to the fundamental problems of operations research. Topics include mathematical programming, network analysis, simulation, probabilistic decision models, queuing and inventory models. Prerequisite or Co-requisite: MATH 306. Three hours per week.
MATH 465 MATHEMATICAL MODELS AND APPLICATIONS [+]
Mathematical basis for model building; examples of simple models for uncomplicated systems in biology, psychology, business and other fields; finite Markov process; models for growth process. May be offered for undergraduate or graduate credit. Prerequisite or Co-requisite: MATH 306. Three hours per week.
MATH 471 NUMERICAL METHODS [+]
Interpolation, functional approximation, numerical differentiation and integration, nonlinear equations, numerical solutions of differential equations, analysis of error. Prerequisites: C or better in COSC 117 or 118 or 120 and one of the following: MATH 306 or MATH 310 or MATH/PHYS 309. Three hours per week.
MATH 472 NUMERICAL LINEAR ALGEBRA [+]
Numerical methods and analysis applied to linear systems. Computer arithmetic and error analysis, direct methods for solving linear systems, iterative techniques in matrix algebra, approximating eigenvalues. Prerequisites: C or better in COSC 117, 118 or 120; MATH 202; MATH?306. Three hours per week.
MATH 475 INTRODUCTION TO DYNAMICS AND CHAOS [+]
Introduction to mathematical dynamics and chaos. Topics include orbits, bifurcations, Cantor sets and horseshoes, symbolic dynamics, fractal dimension, notions of stability, flows and chaos. Includes motivation and historical perspectives, as well as examples of fundamental maps studied in dynamics and applications of dynamics. Prerequisite: MATH 202 or 210. Three hours per week.
MATH 480 HISTORY OF MATHEMATICS [+]
Study of the chronological development of mathematics with emphasis on both the mathematical concepts and the principal contributors to the development of those concepts. May be offered for undergraduate or graduate credit. Prerequisite: MATH 202 or 210 (both recommended). Three hours per week.
MATH 482 COMPUTER GRAPHICS [+]
Generate and manipulate graphic information using the computer. Emphasis on the analysis of fundamental problems associated with these activities and on the structured design of solutions. Cross-listed with COSC 482. May not be taken for credit if student has credit for COSC 482. Prerequisites: C or better in COSC 120, MATH 293 or 306. Three hours per week.
MATH 490 SPECIAL TOPICS [+]
Enables study in specialized areas such as complex variables, logic, non-Euclidean geometry or other topics suggested by faculty or students. May be taken twice under different titles recorded by the registrar. May be offered for undergraduate or graduate credit. Prerequisite: (For most topics) MATH 306, 310. Three hours per week.
MATH 493 ADVANCED TOPICS IN STATISTICS [+]
Study in specialized areas of statistics such as time series, stochastic processes, quality control designs and analyses or other topics suggested by faculty or students. May be repeated once under different subtitles recorded by the registrar. Prerequisites: MATH 213 (or equivalent proficiency in statistics) and permission of instructor. May be offered for undergraduate or graduate credit. Three hours per week.
MATH 495 DIRECTED CONSULTING [+]
Provides teams of 3-12 students with experience in using mathematical and computing tools to solve real-world problems posed by a client organization, such as a research institute, business or industry. Combines individual and group work and requires presentation of a written and oral report to the client organization and the department. Cross-listed with COSC 495. MATH/COSC 495 may be taken twice for a maximum of eight credit hours, but used only once toward a major in mathematics or computer science. Prerequisite: Invitation by the department. Four hours per week. (P/F)
MATH 500 FOUNDATIONS OF NUMBER THEORY [+]
Designed for teachers of arithmetic, with emphasis on the development of the real number system in elementary number theory. Graduate credit only. Prerequisite: One course in college mathematics or consent of instructor. Three hours per week.
MATH 501 NUMBER THEORY FOR A MULTICULTURAL AND HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE [+]
Designed for middle school teachers of mathematics, with emphasis on number systems, historical contexts, multicultural contributions to mathematics, and middle school curriculum. Prerequisite: Admission to graduate study. Three hours lecture per week.
MATH 502 APPLIED STATISTICS [+]
The use of linear models in the analysis of data, starting with simple models and going to more complex models. Special attention given to the use and abuse of these models by researchers. Graduate credit only. Prerequisite: A course in statistics (MATH 155 OR MATH 213). Three hours per week.
MATH 503 DATA ANALYSIS [+]
Designed for middle school teachers of mathematics, with emphasis on the proper collection and analysis of data to draw meaningful conclusions. Descriptive statistics and statistical inference are both included. Explorations will be accomplished using computer software. Prerequisite: Admission to graduate study. Three hours lecture per week.
MATH 506 SELECTED TOPICS [+]
Designed for students with a major in mathematics to develop topics in mathematics not included in their undergraduate program, or to extend areas previously studied. Specific topic may be indicated on transcript. May be taken twice under different course subtitles recorded with the registrar. Graduate credit only. Prerequisite: Approval of the department.
MATH 507 SEMINAR: ALGEBRA [+]
A seminar dealing with selected topics from line art and abstract algebra. A seminar paper is required. Graduate credit only. Prerequisite: Approval of the department.
MATH 508 SEMINAR: GEOMETRY [+]
A seminar dealing with selected topics from geometry. Topics which support course material in the secondary school curriculum will be included. A seminar paper is required. Prerequisite: Admission to graduate study. Three hours lecture per week.
MATH 510 MATHEMATICAL REASONING [+]
Designed to middle school mathematics teachers and others who want to enhance their capabilities in mathematical reasoning. Selected topics from descrete mathematics including sets, logic and proof, relations, graphs, recursions and combinatorics, with a special focus on constructing and presenting well organized arguments and justifications of mathematical statements. Prerequisite: Admission to graduate study (student does not have to be admitted to a graduate program). Three hours lecture per week.
MATH 511 DESIGN AND ANALYSIS OF EXPERIMENTS [+]
Introduction to ideas of planning and designing statistical experiments involving data collection. Study of various statistical analyses for these designs. Discussion of optimal allocation of sampling units to treatments in order to provide the highest accuracy and lowest cost. Use standard statistical software packages such as Minitab and SPSS. Credit may not be received for both MATH 411 and MATH 511. Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 155 or 212, and graduate standing. Three hours per week.
MATH 512 THEORY OF NUMBERS [+]
Basic concepts: integers, prime numbers, divisibility, congruencies and residues. May be offered for undergraduate or graduate credit. Prerequisite: MATH 210 and/or 306 (both recommended), graduate standing required. Three hours per week.
MATH 513 MATHEMATICAL STATISTICS I [+]
Axioms and algebra of probability, discrete and continuous random variables, multivariate distributions, limit theorems. May be offered for undergraduate or graduate credit. Prerequisites: MATH 213, 310. Three hours per week.
MATH 514 MATHEMATICAL STATISTICS II [+]
Methods of estimating, properties of estimator, hypothesis testing, linear models, least squares, analysis of variance, enumerative data, nonparametric statistics. Credit may not be received for more than one: MATH 414, MATH 514. Prerequisite: MATH 413 or 513, staduate standing required. Three hours per week.
MATH 515 MATHEMATICAL MODELS AND APPLICATIONS [+]
Mathematical basis for model building; examples of simple models for uncomplicated systems in biology, psychology, business and other fields; finite Markov process; models for growth process. May be offered for undergraduate or graduate credit. Prerequisite or Co-requisite: MATH 306. Three hours per week.
MATH 516 GEOMETRIC STRUCTURES [+]
Axiomatic development of incidence, ordered incidence, affine and absolute geometries; investigation of Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometries. May be offered for undergraduate or graduate credit. Prerequisite: MATH 210. Three hours per week. Meets General Education IIIB or IIIC.
MATH 520 MIDDLE SCHOOL MATHEMATICS IN A TEACHING CONTEXT WITH INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY [+]
Designed for middle school teachers of mathematics, with emphasis on experimentation with instructional technology and the creation of middle school curriculum that incorporates mathematical understandings developed in other graduate courses. Prerequisite: Admission to graduate study (student does not need to be admitted to a graduate program). Three hours lecture per week.
MATH 530 DIRECTED RESEARCH [+]
Preparation of optional research project in Master of Education program under departmental supervision. Graduate credit only.
MATH 531 MATHEMATICAL CONNECTIONS FOR SECONDARY SCHOOL TEACHERS [+]
Connects the undergraduate mathematics curriculum to the secondary mathematics curriculum by examining high school curriculum topics from an advanced and historical perspective with the goal of deepening understanding of the mathematics required for teaching in secondary schools. Considers contributions from diverse cultures in the examination of the historical development of numbers and number systems, algebra, Euiclidean and non-Euclidean geometries, calculus, discrete mathematics, statistics, probablility, and measurement. Prerequisite: Mathematics teaching experience. Four hours per week.
MATH 541 CONCEPTUAL ALGEBRA FOR TEACHERS [+]
Designed for middle school mathematics teachers or those who wish to teach middle school mathematics. Emphasis on conceptual aspects of algebra and the meanings that underlie it. Prerequisite: Admission to graduate study. Three hours lecture per week.
MATH 551 ANALYSIS I [+]
Modern abstract analysis including topology of the real number system, sequences, continuity and differentiability. Prerequisites: MATH 202, 210, graduate standing required. Credit may not be received for more than one: MATH 451, MATH 551. Three hours per week.
MATH 552 ANALYSIS II [+]
Modern abstract analysis including such topics as convergence of infinite series, sequences of functions, metric spaces, integration, topology of the real number system and continuity. Credit may not be received for more than one: MATH 452, MATH 552. Prerequisite: MATH 451 or 551. Three hours per week.
MATH 555 CARTESIAN TRIAD [+]
Designed for middle school teachers of mathematics, with emphasis on the coordinate geometry of the Euclidean plane. Topics include functions, equations and inequalities, limit concepts, and matrices. Hands-on explorations with computer software is included in the course. Prerequisite: Admission to graduate study. Three hours lecture per week.
MATH 558 COMPLEX ANALYSIS [+]
An introduction to complex variables accessible to juniors and seniors in mathematics and the physical sciences. Topics will include the algebra of the complex number system, analytic functions, contour integrals, elementary functions, sequences, series and residues. More advanced topics may include conformal mapping, the Schwarz-Christoffel transformation, integral formulas of Poisson type and Riemann surfaces. Prerequisites: MATH 31 and either MATH 210 or PHYS 309. Three hours per week.
MATH 560 OPERATIONS RESEARCH [+]
Introduction to the fundamental problems of operations research. Topics include mathematical programming, network analysis, simulation, probabilistic decision models, queuing and inventory models. Credit may not be received for more than one: MATH 460, MATH 560. Prerequisite or Co-requisite: MATH 306, graduate standing required. Three hours per week.
MATH 561 ABSTRACT ALGEBRA I [+]
Introduction to the theory of groups, rings, integral domains and fields, including basic properties of polynomials. May be offered for undergraduate or graduate credit. Prerequisite: MATH 210 and/or 306 (both recommended). Three hours per week. Meets General Education IIIB or IIIC.
MATH 562 ABSTRACT ALGEBRA II [+]
Modern abstract algebra including such topics as rings, polynomials and fields. Other topics may include algebraic coding, Boolean algebras, symmetry and mathematical crystallography, applications of finite fields to computer science. Credit may not be received for more than one: MATH 442, MATH 562. Prerequisite: MATH 441 or 561, graduate standing required. Three hours per week.
MATH 565 MODELING FOR MIDDLE SCHOOL TEACHERS [+]
Designed for middle school teachers of mathematics, with emphasis on expressing mathematical relationships found in the real world. The models studied will vary. Examples of technology to support the course include spreadsheets, simulation packages, graphing calculators, and electronic devices to gather data for laboratory exercises. Prerequisite: Admission to graduate study. Three hours lecture per week.
MATH 566 FROM EUCLID TO MODERN DAY [+]
Designed for middle school teachers of mathematics. Topics include axiomic formulations, Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometry, spirals, symmetry, coordinate geometry, graphs, networks, fractals and geometry in art. Prerequisite: Admission to graduate study. Three hours lecture per week.
MATH 571 NUMERICAL METHODS [+]
Interpolation, functional approximation, numerical differentiation and integration, nonlinear equations, numerical solutions of differential equations, analysis of error. May not receive credit for both MATH 471 and MATH 571. Prerequisites: C or better in COSC 117 or 118 or 120 and one of the following: MATH 306 or MATH 310 or PHYS 309, graduate standing required. three hours per week.
MATH 575 INTRODUCTION TO DYNAMICS AND CHAOS [+]
Introduction to mathematical dynamics and chaos. Topics include orbits, bifurcations, Cantor sets and horseshoes, symbolic dynamics, fractal dimension, notions of stability, flows and chaos. Includes motivation and historical perspectives, as well as examples of fundamental maps studied in dynamics and applications of dynamics. Three hours per week.
MATH 580 HISTORY OF MATHEMATICS [+]
Study of the chronological development of mathematics with emphasis on both the mathematical concepts and the principal contributors to the development of those concepts. May be offered for undergraduate or graduate credit. Prerequisite: MATH 202 or 210 (both recommended). Three hours per week.
MATH 582 COMPUTER GRAPHICS [+]
Generate and manipulate graphic information using the computer. Emphasis on the analysis of fundamental problems associated with these activities and on the structured design of solutions. Cross-listed with COSC 482/582. May Credit may not be received for more than one: COSC 482, COSC 582, MATH 482, MATH 582. Prerequisites: COSC 120, MATH 306, graduate standing required. Three hours per week.
MATH 590 SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN MATHEMATICS [+]
Individually designed programs including summer workshops and special seminars. Specific topic indicated on transcript. May be taken twice under different course subtitles recorded with the registrar. Graduate credit only. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
MATH 593 ADVANCED TOPICS IN STATISTICS [+]
Study in specialized areas of statistics such as time series, stochastic processes, quality control designs and analyses or other topics suggested by faculty or students. May be repeated once under different subtitles recorded by the registrar. Prerequisites: MATH 213 (or equivalent proficiency in statistics) and permission of instructor. May be offered for undergraduate or graduate credit. Three hours per week.