SPRING 2015 COURSES

Long Ago and Far Away: A Potpourri of History

We will cover four world-changing occurrences. Topics include: (1) The library across time: From Alexandria through the Renaissance and on to the New World; (2) Let’s visit Austria: The culture and historic development of the Sound of Music country; (3) The great gamble of the Nineteenth Century: How we won the Smithsonian; and (4) A ninety-year old waitress: The extraordinary saga of the Woman’s Exchange Movement as the United States matured.

Mondays, Mar. 9, Mar. 23–Apr. 6 (4 sessions) Location: SU, Nabb Center

10-11:30 a.m. Course Leader: Eleanor Mulligan

Psychology of Aging

There are more older people in the USA than ever before, and we are now part of this surging population. Unlike many of our grandparents and parents, we will not be content sitting in a rocking chair with an afghan and a plate of cookies. We are living longer, working longer, staying connected, striving for a healthy quality life, and, yes, even loving longer. We are challenging stereotypes and defying a “culture of youth” that still seems caught in the age-phobic dark ages. In essence, we are older people--with attitude! This course will focus on the psychology of those that are now considered senior citizens, but it is also focused on the psychology of the “younger” whose reactions to the elderly are frequently based on their own fear of aging.

Tuesdays, Feb. 10-Mar. 17 (6 sessions) Location: Bethany Lutheran Church

10-11:30 a.m. Course Leader: Carolyn Stegman

Europe: What Makes it Tick? And Will it Keep on Ticking Smoothly?

We all know what Europe is, or do we? Out of an "Old Europe” of our imagination, childhood and days gone by, a "New Europe" has been steadily developing and changing over the past 60 years. In that period Europe has experienced the longest period of peace and prosperity in its history. And yet, today, tensions and cracks are appearing, and the future is not so clear. How did Europe get to where it is today, where is it headed and what will that mean to us? This course will explore the background to the changes, and the challenges that lie ahead for it and for the US.

Tuesdays, Mar. 24–Apr. 28 (6 sessions) Location: SU, TETC 253

12 Noon-1:30 p.m. Course Leader: Robert Becker

[Top]

For the Love of God: Exploring Faith in Fiction

A source of hope, conflict, and comfort, religion continues to inspire fiction writers – our on-site reporters of the human comedy. This course will analyze short stories from around the world that focus on efforts to reconcile belief in the hereafter with life in the here and now. Topics will include “Papa Don’t Preach,” “Take My Sins – Please,” “Suffer the Children,” and “Be Excellent to Each Other.”

Wednesdays, Feb. 11-Mar. 18 (6 sessions) Location: Bethany Lutheran Church

10-11:30 a.m. Course Leader: Nancy Hesser

Eden's Edge: Africa in World Literature

Africa beckons. Romanticized and demonized by Western writers, the vast continent and its diverse cultures have inspired readers and adventurers worldwide, while Africa’s own authors offer a burgeoning body of “must read” fiction. This course will examine stories by a wide selection of writers, tracing topics such as “Eden and Outpost,” “Safari’s End,” “Color Wheels,” and “Old Songs, New Voices.”

Wednesdays, Mar. 25-Apr. 29 (6 sessions) Location: Bethany Lutheran Church

10-11:30 a.m. Course Leader: Nancy Hesser

Perception and Evolution: A World of Diverse Signals

The natural world is full of signals. For example, cardinals are red, birds and insects sing, and mammals release odors. All of these are signals that facilitate communication among animals. In the 150 years since Darwin first grappled with the topic, biologists have made important discoveries regarding how animal signals evolve. Most recently, however, biologists are examining how animal brains generate sensory perceptions and how these perceptions can be a critical aspect of animal signal evolution. In this course we will examine how animal brains put together complex sensory information, how animals make sense of this information (perceive it), and the role this plays in the evolution of extraordinary animal diversity.

Thursdays, Feb. 12-Mar. 5 (4 sessions) Location: Bethany Lutheran Church

10-11:30 a.m. Course Leader: Ryan Taylor

[Top]

From Beethoven to Wagner

This course will deal with the nature and development of the Leitmotif, its precursors and psychology, and when a symphony became a vehicle for the utterance of thoughts. Specific works will include Beethoven 6th, Berlioz Fantastic, Weber Der Freischutz, and Wagner’s Tristan. The first half of the course will concentrate on the Classical Movement, and the second part will focus on music drama, program music, the Leitmotif and Gesamtkunstwerk.

Thursdays, Mar. 26-Apr. 30 (6 sessions) Location: Bethany Lutheran Church

10-11:30 a.m. Course Leader: Tom Elliot

Great Decisions: Discussion of Major Issues Worldwide

This course will introduce complex foreign policy decision-making. Participants broaden their outlook on major issues worldwide while they examine contextual information, improve decision-making skills through class discussion, debate, and comments from recognized leaders in the field, all this helping them to become better informed “world citizens.” Participants should order the Great Decisions Briefing Book, 2015 edition, at a cost of $22, plus shipping, before the beginning of the class. It may be ordered via the internet at www.fpa.org. Click on “Great Decisions.” The mailing address is Foreign Policy Association, 470 Park Avenue South, New York, NY 10016. The phone number is 212-481-8100.

Thursdays, Feb. 12–Apr. 2 (8 sessions) Location: Bethany Lutheran Church

12 Noon-1:30 p.m. Course Leader: Jarvis Cain

You Can’t Do THAT in Jazz: Improvising and Innovating America’s Music

In its history of over a century, jazz has changed profoundly with every generation and every innovator – often taking the art form beyond the safe zone of musicians and listeners alike. Topics include: 1) You Can’t Play That! – Unconventional Instruments (from saxophone and organ to oboe and electric guitar); 2) You Can’t Count That! – Different Time Signatures (from waltz to polyrhythms); 3) You Can’t Sing That! – Crazy Vocals (from scat to vocalese); 4) You Can’t Make Music with That! – Not-so-mellow Tones (from Bop and global to free jazz and 12 tone). Participants will explore how jazz has always pushed at its frontiers and by doing so shaped the American (and global) ear.

Thursdays, Feb. 12-Mar. 5 (4 sessions) Location: SU, TETC 156

2:30-4 p.m. Course Leader: Phil Hesser

[Top]

From Hoof Prints to Foot Prints: The Role of People on Assateague Island

People of European decent have probably been using Assateague Island since the last quarter of the 17th century, so the island was a busy place long before the establishment of Assateague Island National Seashore in 1965. During this four week course, we will explore human history on Assateague as we discover how those who have spent time on island changed it and how they, in turn, have been changed by the island. Please join us as we touch on topics such as the history of the American Indians who used Assateague, early European settlements, the presence of the US Lifesaving Service and the unsuccessful Ocean Beach development.

Fridays, Feb. 20-Mar. 13 (4 sessions) Location: SU, GUC 236 Nanticoke Room

10-11:30 a.m. Course Leader: Kelly Taylor

The Fall of the Roman Empire and the Barbarian Invasion

Did the Roman Empire fall from within as a result of internal decay and corruption or as a result of the Barbarian invasions? This course will cover the Roman Empire from the time of the reign of Augustus and will end with the invasions of the various Barbarian Tribes, including the Huns, the Goths, the Vandals, and the Lombards.

Fridays, Mar. 27–May 1 (6 sessions) Location: SU, GUC 236 Nanticoke Room

10-11:30 a.m. Course Leader: Joseph Chaikel

[Top]

ALL Course Schedule-At-A-Glance: Spring 2015

Time Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
10:00 am - 11:30 am Long Ago and Far Away: A Potpourri of History
Mar. 9, Mar. 23–Apr. 6 (four sessions)
Psychology of Aging.
Feb. 10-Mar. 17 (six sessions)
For the Love of God: Exploring Faith in Fiction
Feb. 11-Mar. 18 (six sessions)
  -------------
Eden's Edge: Africa in World Literature
Mar. 25-Apr. 29 (six sessions)
Perception and Evolution: A World of Diverse Signals
Feb. 12-Mar. 5 (four sessions)
  -------------
From Beethoven to Wagner
Mar. 26-Apr. 30 (six sessions)
From Hoof Prints to Foot Prints: The Role of People on Assateague Island
Feb. 20-Mar. 13 (four sessions)
  -------------
The Fall of the Roman Empire and the Barbarian Invasion
Mar. 27–May 1 (six sessions)
12 noon - 1:30 pm   Europe: What Makes it Tick? And Will it Keep on Ticking Smoothly?
Mar. 24–Apr. 28 (six sessions)
  Great Decisions: Discussion of Major Issues Worldwide
Feb. 12–Apr. 2 (eight sessions)
2:30 pm - 4:00 pm       You Can’t Do THAT in Jazz: Improvising and Innovating America’s Music .
Feb. 12-Mar. 5 (four sessions)
 

[Top]