Center for International Education

 

Holloway Hall

American Studies Module (Sample Coursework)

Departmental Brochures

Fall Semester

HIST 201 HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES
4 hours credit each
Survey of the political, economic, social and cultural factors that have shaped the pattern of life in the United States. Particular problems examined in the light of their sources and historical development. HIST 201 goes through 1865.

Spring Semester
Choose any two courses below. Not all courses are available each year.

ENGL 380. AMERICAN LITERATURE I:
BEGINNINGS TO 1860
4 hours credit
Study of major American literature from the nation’s origins to 1860. Authors to be studied may include, but are not limited to, Edwards, Franklin, Hawthorne, Irving, Melville, Poe and Whitman.

ENGL 381. AMERICAN LITERATURE II: 1860-PRESENT
4 hours credit
Study of major American literature from 1860 to the present. Authors to be studied may include, but are not limited to, Crane, London, Chopin, T.S. Eliot, Gilman, Faulkner, O’Neill,
Hurston, Hughes, Welty, Ellison, Baldwin, Barthelme and Morrison.

ENGL 383. AFRICAN-AMERICAN LITERATURE
4 hours credit
A study of African-American literature and its relationship to African-American movements and the experience of African- Americans in America. Authors may include Wheatley,
Douglass, Jacobs, Harper, DuBois, Washington, Hurston, Wright, Ellison, Hansberry, Baraka and Morrison.

ENGL 384. NATIVE AMERICAN LITERATURE
4 hours credit
Study of the literature that grew out of the unique perceptions and experiences of the Native Americans with particular emphasis on poetry, short stories and novels. Authors include
Erdrich, Silko, Momaday, Black Elk, Welch and Oritz.

ENGL 385. ETHNIC LITERATURE IN AMERICA
4 hours credit
Explores literature of America’s ethnic cultures and their historical and literary contexts. Emphasizes but not limited to literature of African-, Asian-, Jewish-, Mexican- and Native- Americans.

ENGL 386. AMERICAN WOMEN WRITERS OF COLOR
4 hours credit
Study of Native American, African-American, U.S., Latina and Asian American women’s writing, emphasizing 19th and 20th century issues which influenced their writing.

ENGL 387. LITERATURE OF THE AMERICAN WEST: 1820-Present
4 hours credit
A study of journals and travel narratives and popular, regional and historical novels of the American West. Works of writers such as Cooper, Twain, Steinbeck, Anaya, Cather and Silko.
 
ENGL 388. AMERICAN DRAMA
4 hours credit
Historical survey of American drama from its beginnings to the present. Includes works by major American dramatists, such as Hellman, O’Neill, Williams, Miller and Henley.

HIST 202. HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES
4 hours credit each
Survey of the political, economic, social and cultural factors that have shaped the pattern of life in the United States. Particular problems examined in the light of their sources and historical development. HIST 202 goes from 1865 to the present.

250. AMERICA IN THE 1970S
4 hours credit
Archie Bunker, bell bottoms, The Exorcist, Nixon, Grease and disco—the 1970s conjure memories of such personalities, fads and other pop-cultural phenomena. This introductory
course surveys American history during the so-called “Me Decade” using films, documentaries, readings, discussions, lectures and primary sources to explore political, diplomatic,
economic, social, intellectual and cultural trends.

HIST 301. HISTORY OF AMERICAN BUILDINGS
4 hours credit
Survey of the history of American building traditions, considering construction, form and style in historical, social, economic and cultural contexts.

HIST 302. COLONIAL AND REVOLUTIONARY AMERICA
(1607-1783)
4 hours credit
Detailed study of foundations of American civilization. Economic, political, social, cultural and religious factors are emphasized. Consideration of English policy and the revolution are included.

HIST 306. THE EMERGENCE OF A NEW NATION: U.S. (1789-1860)
4 hours credit
Covers such topics as the new government and its policies, nationalism and economic expansion, the common man and the new democracy, social ferment and reform movements, Manifest Destiny, wars and sectional crises.

HIST 308. SECTIONAL CONFLICT AND CIVIL WAR
4 hours credit
Study of the origins, development and outcome of the struggle between the North and South to the end of the Civil War. Emphasis on the clash of national and sectional interests and the course of the military conflict to its conclusion.

HIST 309. RECONSTRUCTION AND GILDED AGE
4 hours credit
Study of the policies and application of presidential and congressional reconstruction; examination of the influence of the post-Civil War industrial boom on politics and society.

HIST 380. THE AMERICAN MILITARY EXPERIENCE
4 hours credit
Military history enables students to understand better the role played by the armed forces in American society today through a study of the origins and development of military institutions,
traditions and practices in the United States, 1775 to the present.

HIST 382. AMERICAN RELIGIOUS HISTORY
4 hours credit
Survey of religious developments in America from pre- European settlement to the 20th century. Special attention to relationships among social, cultural and religious changes.

HIST 383. HISTORY OF AMERICAN ENTERPRISE
4 hours credit
Study of the development of the American entrepreneurial spirit and its influence on culture, society and politics from the European heritage to the present.

HIST 384. NATIVE AMERICAN HISTORY
4 hours credit
Explores Native American history before contact with Europeans, through struggles with the emerging new nation, forced reservations and Indian activism, to current status of tribal members. Examines the political, economic, social and cultural aspects of Native Americans.

HIST 386. WILDERNESS AND U.S. CULTURE, 1492-PRESENT
4 hours credit
Study of historical factors that contributed to attitudes toward wilderness and preservation efforts. Particular emphasis on American thought with special attention to Thoreau, Cole, Muir and Leopold.

HIST 387. RACISM AND DISCRIMINATION
4 hours credit
Multiperspective historical examination of the nature, origins and growth of racism and discrimination in America, with particular emphasis on the 20th century.

HIST 388. CIVIL RIGHTS IN AMERICAN HISTORY
4 hours credit
History of civil rights in America from the colonial period to the present; emphasis on the application of civil rights legislation to African-Americans and Indians and expansion to include
women and others.

HIST 389. U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY
4 hours credit
History of rural and urban land use. Topics include the rise of the public lands movement and environmentalism in the United States, the history of ecology and the cultural roots of the modern environmental crisis.

HIST 395. MATERIAL CULTURE STUDIES IN AMERICAN HISTORY
4 hours credit
Introduction to the specialized study of the American past through examination of cultural artifacts and documents relating to them.

POSC 110. AMERICAN NATIONAL GOVERNMENT
4 hours credit
Comprehensive examination of the American political process which analyzes the role of the Constitution, the organization and function of the presidency, Congress, Supreme Court, political parties and interest groups and the distribution of power within American society.

POSC 202. STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT IN THE UNITED STATES
4 hours credit
Examination of state and local governments in terms of how political power is organized and policies adopted. Focuses on forms of governing that encourage citizen participation.

POSC 205. WOMEN IN POLITICS
4 hours credit
Study of the recent history and politics of women’s rights in the U.S. and the impact of the women’s movement in its various manifestations. Examines the route to political activism
taken by women and the issues that unite and divide them.

POSC 215. AMERICAN FOREIGN POLICY
4 hours credit
Emphasizes areas of foreign policy: the individuals, organizations and procedures involved in foreign policy making; the major approaches of U.S. foreign policy; and current issues.

POSC 230. JUDICIAL PROCESS AND POLITICS
4 hours credit
Examines the structure and role of courts in the American political process. State and federal court systems and the role of judges are explored. Emphasis is on how courts function
within the legal and political environment while acting as policy makers.