2015 Teaching & Learning Conference

Search Sessions

Session ID:
00
Time/Location:
PH 156, 9:00 - 9:50 AM
Presenter(s):
Dr. James Forte
Title:
From Theory to Practice: Creative Strategies for Teaching Practical Theorizing
Abstract:
(click to view)
Many students appear to consider the language of scientific theory more complex and less useful than Klingon. For 7 years, I have been exploring creative ways to demonstrate theory’s relevance to professional and practical concerns. During this 50-minute session, I will model the roles of theory translator and theory user. Participants will enact the role of reluctant or cautious “theory and theorizing” learners. Throughout, I will refer to examples from my own research and theoretical work on intimate partner violence. After a brief summary of the major barriers to theory use and my MMMMMMM tools for tearing down the walls, I will lead a condensed class. Alternating repeatedly between a mini-lecture, a media clip, and small group work, we will learn how theorizing is like a mystery or puzzle solving process. We will activate our metaphorical imaginations to understand the place of “labels” and “status shields” in domestic violence. We will practice theoretical modeling as related to identifying and organizing the major variables explaining the coping choices of an abused person. We will draw a map, a visual display representing the arrangement of the variables from our narrative summary. We will also use marks of excellence to judge the strengths and limitations of the interactionist theory of violence, and to identify avoidable theory application mistakes. To conclude, I will summarize my approach to enticing students to add the “practical theorist” role to their repertoire of post-college roles. Participants will also learn the meaning of each letter in my mantra for life success, ITHEORIZE.
Type:
Keynote

Session ID:
01
Time/Location:
PH 156, 10:00 - 10:50 AM
Presenter(s):
James Buss, Derya Kulavuz-Onal, Rebecca Anthony, Leonard Arvi, and Carole Champagne
Title:
Engaging Academically Adrift Students for Critical Awareness of College Life
Abstract:
(click to view)
Throughout the fall 2014 semester, interested faculty engaged in a Faculty Learning Community (FLC), which aimed at reading and discussing two books: Degrees of Inequality by Suzanne Metler, and Academically Adrift: Limited Learning on College Campuses by Richard Arum and Josipa Roksa. With the two books facilitating discussions around students, learning, college life, and academic studies, and with the current efforts to facilitate civic engagement as well as critical thinking across the campus, we found that it is timely to bring up the discussions to a wider faculty audience to share ideas and experiences as to how we as faculty members could raise awareness among students about these issues. Based upon our readings and discussions in our FLC, this panel will specifically explore the ways the faculty may engage the so-called academically adrift students towards a more critical awareness of the social and academic issues surrounding their college experience. After the chair gives information about the background of the FLCs, the co-chairs will first review the two books focusing on the main arguments and themes such as the existing inequality among those who can afford to attend and stay in college, students’ decreasing academic engagement, and perceptions of college life as a social rather than an academic and intellectual one. After that, all panel participants will present what their current efforts are to engage students in college life more academically, and critically, bringing in diverse perspectives from a variety of departments. During the last 20 minutes of the panel, we plan to extend the discussion to the audience, by facilitating it through two specific questions in groups: 1) What are current issues surrounding students’ college experience? 2) In what ways can you integrate these issues into your course content to encourage critical awareness as well as increase on-going academic engagement? "
Type:
Panel Discussion

Session ID:
02
Time/Location:
PH 258, 10:00 - 10:50 AM
Presenter(s):
Sean Cooper
Title:
Successfully integrating international students into the university classroom
Abstract:
(click to view)
This presentation will address the integration of the growing number of international students on campus. As educators, we want to encourage all students to be successful; in order to do so we must be aware of the unique challenges that international students face. While this does not necessarily mean that educators must change their teaching style or accommodate international students, there are certain things that can be done to improve their chances of success. Topics covered during the presentation include cultural background, differences in learning/teaching styles, expectations of instructors vs. students, and techniques for improving success including success stories from around campus.
Type:
50 Minute Presentation

Session ID:
03A
Time/Location:
PH 274, 10:00 - 10:25 AM
Presenter(s):
Paul Scovell
Title:
Using Portfolios in the Classroom
Abstract:
(click to view)
The presentation will provide an overview of how you can utilize portfolios to record and asses student work throughout the semester or as a final project. Both online and print portfolios will be discussed, creating web sites and using commercial portfolio sites.
Type:
25 Minute Presentation

Session ID:
04
Time/Location:
PH 277, 10:00 - 10:50 AM
Presenter(s):
Heidi Moore, Lori Carmack, Wayne Shelton, Sarah Surak
Title:
Sustainability in the Curriculum: Using the Campus as a Lab
Abstract:
(click to view)
The physical space of the campus provides an opportunity for faculty to connect teaching and practice. In the context of sustainability, SU's campus offers numerous sites for student learning and knowledge inside and outside of the classroom. This session will explore the many ways faculty might incorporate sustainability into any classroom through the use of campus data and the facilitation of learning-based student projects. Wayne Shelton, Director of Campus Sustainability will begin by providing an overview of campus metrics that might be utilized in classroom teaching. Using past examples Wayne will emphasize successful cases of faculty and students using the campus as a site for research and teaching. Lori Carmack and XXX will then describe their efforts to teach sustainability concepts within the classroom.
Type:
Panel Discussion

Session ID:
03B
Time/Location:
PH 274, 10:25 -10:50 AM
Presenter(s):
J. Craig Clarke, Daphne Heflin, Amanda Garcia, Katie Ricker, Mark Walter, and Thomas J. Tomcho
Title:
Applying to graduate school: Effectiveness of online sources for communicating information
Abstract:
(click to view)
"Websites maintained by the American Psychological Association and Psi Chi (the National Honor Society in Psychology) provide information about applying to graduate school. However, little is known about the effectiveness of published online information despite the fact that it is both readily available and often recommended to psychology undergraduates. Academic advisors and research mentors routinely discuss the ins and outs of graduate school and the graduate school application process with their students. While these one on one or small group interactions may be effective they are not particularly efficient ways to communicate information. The purpose of our study was to investigate the more efficient means of communication found in online sources of information about the graduate school application process. Online sources tend to be well documented, well organized, and available 24/7. Unfortunately, our study does not provide any evidence to lead us to believe that online sources by themselves are an effective means of communication for information about applying to graduate school in psychology. Brucato and Neimeyer (2011) noted that their findings “seem to suggest that engaging students actively in the processes of graduate preparation registers a positive effect, whereas leaving them to their own devices over the same period results in no appreciable changes” (Brucato & Neimeyer, 2011, p. 170). In a pretest/posttest design, we found that neither Psi Chi members (n=9), nor students in a psychological statistics course (n=61), when left to their own devices, increased their knowledge as a result of exposure to different websites. We plan to discuss these findings as they relate to academic majors beyond psychology. "
Type:
25 Minute Presentation

Session ID:
05
Time/Location:
PH 156, 11:00 - 11:50 AM
Presenter(s):
Alexander Pope, Celine Carayon, Derya Kulavuz-Onal, and Melany Trenary
Title:
Civic engagement at SU: Reflections from recent faculty experiences
Abstract:
(click to view)
"This panel discussion will include an explanation of AmeriCorps and in particular the AmeriCorps program at Salisbury University, Shore Corps/PALS, and service-learning. Specifically it will relate how AmeriCorps and service-learning build ties with the community. Consequently the panel will include representatives from various community sites that partner with Shore Corps/PALS. The sites will be diverse in terms of size and location. In this context we will present ideas about standards for the quality practice of service-learning that are incorporated into the Shore Corps/PALS program. These standards include meaningful projects that address real community needs. Panel members will delineate the community needs their AmeriCorps members are addressing and their service activities. In addition to their service, students also have various learning experiences designed to make them more effective leaders and members at their sites. To that end we require AmeriCorps members to enroll in IDIS 280 in the fall and spring semesters. A hallmark of service-learning is reflection. Ideas for reflection that incorporate multiple intelligences will be offered. Effective service-learning programs also monitor progress. Panelist will discuss how this is accomplished. Other characteristics of effective programs include duration and intensity. To that end, students investigate community needs, prepare for service, and then engage in action, reflection, demonstrate learning and impact and finally celebrate their service. Attendees will then have an opportunity to work through an exercise where they decide on a concept or concepts in their courses that could be taught using service-learning. They will be asked to identify the community need relative to the concept and then specify the type of agency where students might serve. At the end of the session participants will have a concrete plan to include service-learning in one or more of their classes. "
Type:
Panel Discussion

Session ID:
06
Time/Location:
PH 258, 11:00 - 11:50 AM
Presenter(s):
Shawn McEntee
Title:
What do we do with them? Engaging the disengaged.
Abstract:
(click to view)
"How to engage the disengaged. I'm not talking about students who have decided what to major in; they've found their interests. I'm not talking about our 'good' students who already have the intellectual curiousity and the skills to do what we we're asking them to do. I'm talking about the students who, when you ask them what they are interested in, say 'I don't know'. What do we do with them? I'm not talking about the students who say 'I don't know' because they are afraid of us (although some of them are). I'm not talking about the students who say 'I don't know' because they they think we are asking about their interests IN our disciplines. I'm asking about the students who say 'I don't know' because they really DON'T know what they are interested in; nothing holds their interests longer than a moment, and certainly nothing academic holds their interest for longer than a split second. What do we do with them? This is the growing divide in our country -- between the intellectually curious and the 'dull'. What do we do with them? "
Type:
50 Minute Presentation

Session ID:
07
Time/Location:
PH 274, 11:00 - 11:50 AM
Presenter(s):
Jennifer Merrill
Title:
O' Teacher Where Art Thou? - Adding Human Elements to Your Online Courses
Abstract:
(click to view)
O' Teacher, Where Art Thou? Adding Human Elements to Online Courses "Where is the instructor?" "Are we teaching ourselves?" Have you ever found yourself in this situation where a student tells you that they feel like they are teaching themselves? Ever feel that way when you attend an online course? In the online world of learning, students can feel alone and isolated, deserted and left with only readings and concepts to acquire on their own. How can you convey to students that you are present and actively involved as their leader in this educational encounter? The answer is as simple as it is complicated; add more human components to your online environment. To be effective and andragogically sound, e-Learning must be about the people in the course. Students still need human interaction and the feeling of community to successfully learn online, just like they would in a face-to-face setting. Studies have found that even those distance students who prefer to learn on their own still seek others to help when they struggle. Proper support is needed for students in the form of intentional course design and instructor presence. We know that lack of instructor presence can have negative consequences for the learners. So, what can instructors do to add human interaction? Investing a little time and energy in the design phase of the course instructors can use the following: -Give individualized and timely feedback (possibly using technology to record your feedback message) -Utilize audio and video to add your own voice and face to the course at various intervals -Send personalized notes to students -Check-in your course often -Leave evidence that you have been present in the course -Be more intentional about reaching out and getting feedback What tools will we discuss to prepare attendees to add that human touch? -VoiceThread -Camtasia -VideoEverywhere -Articulate Storyline -Audacity -Voki Objectives Given the concepts of how to add human elements to online courses, attendees will -Identify andragogical advantages of adding human elements to their course -Relate best practices to effectively humanize their virtual course environment -Explore practical applications to intentionally design their online course for instructor presence -Develop ideas and plans to adapt their courses to include more human interaction
Type:
25 Minute Presentation

Session ID:
08A
Time/Location:
PH 277, 11:00 - 11:25 AM
Presenter(s):
Jacques Koko
Title:
Effectiveness of Student Motivation Tactics in Teaching and Learning
Abstract:
(click to view)
Finding creative ways to motivate students certainly results into great benefits for teaching and learning. Using personal class observations and comparative analysis, this presentation suggests how specific tactics such using mottos, reflective listening, paraphrasing, and identity recognition have the potential to increase student engagement in class discussions and ultimately maximize the chances of student interest in the course.
Type:
25 Minute Presentation

Session ID:
08B
Time/Location:
PH 277, 11:25 - 11:50 AM
Presenter(s):
Judith Franzak
Title:
Structured Discussions in the Dialogic Classroom
Abstract:
(click to view)
What is a dialogic classroom and how do structured discussion protocols help foster a challenging learning context for students? This presentation will explore how to deepen student learning through discussion. A frequent instructor concern is how to effectively manage the dynamic context of a dialogic class while supporting all learners by helping the dominant voices to learn to listen and cultivating reluctant voices. Learning protocols are useful tools for addressing this challenge. This presentation format will be interactive, and attendees will leave with ideas for implementing discussion formats in a variety of content area contexts.
Type:
25 Minute Presentation

Session ID:
09A
Time/Location:
PH 156 Lobby, 12:00 - 12:50 PM
Presenter(s):
Elisabeth Mason
Title:
Enhancement Workshops-A practical self-guided approach to hands on mentorship
Abstract:
(click to view)
"Salisbury University’s Communication Arts Department (CMAT) offers 3 hour classes with one 4th credit of enhancement to be completed outside of the classroom. These enhanced classes intend to engage students more in their courses and provide them with a deeper and more active learning experience with the subject. All enhanced courses in the Fulton School require more work than they did as 3 credit courses. Enhancement workshops can be a component of the 4th credit of enhancement. Enhancement workshops are guided study completed entirely outside of the classroom. They are constituted by a series of assignments that break down a large process, such as learning to prepare for a specific type of presentation into the steps necessary to create said presentation. Individual components are provided to the students in small, bite-sized portions, each new bite released after the first has been submitted for review by the instructor. The adaptive release format was achieved with instruction from the staff at the Office of Instructional Design and Delivery. After an assignment is submitted, it is evaluated by the instructor and returned with comments and the option to resubmit for full credit if corrections are made. This very practical self-help approach to the time spent on an assignment outside of the classroom appeals to today’s students, millennials who value pragmatism and who have more student loan debt than previous generations. Where in the past it was acceptable for students to make the most out of their University experience and “get out of it what they put into it”; enhancement workshops provide structure in which students can autonomously engage in detailed guidance along each step of a process, with a mentor “at their side” along the way. This individual thanks the Office of Instructional Design and Delivery for their assistance and instruction and essentially making this project possible from the technology side; I look forward to a continuing relationship with the Office of Instructional Design and Delivery. "
Type:
Poster

Session ID:
09B
Time/Location:
PH 156 Lobby, 12:00 - 12:50 PM
Presenter(s):
Kathleen Shannon
Title:
Center for Applied Mathematics and Science at Salisbury University
Abstract:
(click to view)
"The centerpiece of the Center for Applied Mathematics & Science (CAMS) is a four credit undergraduate course, Directed Consulting, which provides students with the opportunity to work on a real - not just realistic - problem. While providing this educational experience for Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) students, CAMS helps businesses, industries and educational agencies solve problems in strategic ways. CAMS clients work with the program director, Dr. Kathleen Shannon (Salisbury Department of Mathematics and Computer Science), to define a problem their business/organization would like to have addressed. The director then identifies faculty with the appropriate knowledge and expertise to direct a group of four to ten talented, dedicated undergraduate students, who spend a semester studying and addressing the problem while enrolled in the Directed Consulting course. At the end of the semester, the students prepare a written report and presentation, which includes the results of their study and their recommendations to their client. CAMS clients have included Orbital Sciences, Business Economic and Community Outreach Network (BEACON), Salisbury University, Filtronic Comtek*, and Computer Sciences Corporation*. At present CAMS is funded through a National Science Foundation grant but we will be exploring alternative funding options, hopefully in cooperation with clients, in the future. We are also interested in expanding the client base though increased connections with the community. We hope through this showcase to begin that process. *In its previous incarnation as the Center for Applied Mathematical Sciences under the directorship of Dr. E. Lee May"
Type:
Poster

Session ID:
09C
Time/Location:
PH 156 Lobby, 12:00 - 12:50 PM
Presenter(s):
Vinita Agarwal
Title:
Community Communication
Abstract:
(click to view)
"The Communication Arts Department (CMAT) offers diversified knowledge, experience, and skills to work with community partners from across the street or around the globe. These community partnerships can help agencies and students develop skills in personal and professional relationships, organizational dynamics, management and leadership, cultural communication, meeting and conference planning, media writing, radio/TV/film production, and media literacy. Communication-Community projects can be designed to meet different needs, time-lines, locations, and budgets. Project needs might be service-learning (connecting class content to volunteer opportunities), community-based research (collecting and analyzing useful agency information), or civic engagement (encouraging government leaders to enact tangible changes). These may range from volunteering a few hours at a local organization to traveling across the world for a semester project. Budgets vary from no cost to thousands of dollars in grant support. The Communication program has collaborated with numerous community partners. Local organizations include Stop the Violence Gym, Sheila’s Kids Mentoring Project, HALO, United Needs and Abilities, Assateague Coastal Trust, Salisbury Zoo, and Bike-SBY. We collaborate with government agencies like Wicomico County Board of Education, Wicomico County STARS MAST, Wicomico Mentor Project, and Wicomico Partnership for Families and Children. Outside of our region, we work with National Public Radio and with service sites in Guatemala and Ecuador. We also collaborate with the Institute for Public Affairs and Civic Engagement, registered student organizations, the Counseling Center, Office of Diversity, and departments of Education, Environmental Studies, Psychology, and Art. CMAT faculty are dedicated instructors who practice what we teach. We are active researchers, authoring numerous books, chapters, articles, and government publications. Faculty receive grants to support our community-based work. Many faculty have received prestigious awards. We have access to SU's library resources, computer software, grant databases and application assistance, and state-of-the-art Integrated Media Center to support Communication-Community partnerships. "
Type:
Poster

Session ID:
09D
Time/Location:
PH 156 Lobby, 12:00 - 12:50 PM
Presenter(s):
Bill Nelson, Priscilla Timken
Title:
ENVR Community Outreach Projects
Abstract:
(click to view)
The Environmental Studies department sponsored two community outreach projects last fall: Improving Wildlife Habitat: Continuing a program started last spring by a group of SU ENVR students—making boring bee nest boxes and bat roost boxes for distribution to the community, this fall SU ENVR students created 25 nest box “kits” (10 bee boxes, six bat boxes, three bluebird boxes, three robin/barn swallow boxes and three barred owl boxes) to accommodate three classes of Bennett high school environmental science students. In November, SU students brought the kits, plus hand tools and painting materials, to Bennett, where they helped the high school students build the boxes. Each high school group researched the habitat requirements of their chosen species to establish the optimum place to hang the boxes at the Hazel Outdoor Discovery Center, then installed the boxes there. Make-a-Heron Contest: Last spring the City of Salisbury started a “Stash Your Trash” anti-litter campaign. An ENVR Green Floor student designed the logo for the campaign; Green Floor students helped make the “pledge quilt” designed to promote it. This past fall we continued our involvement by hosting a Make-a-Heron contest to further raise awareness. The Environmental Studies department provided steel heron frames (welded from pieces of chain link fence) to groups who created a life-sized heron sculpture out of recyclable and found objects. ENVR hosted two Saturday workshops to help people construct their sculptures. Completed sculptures were displayed downtown at the November Third Friday, where the public voted for a winner. The city then adopted the sculpture as its official “Stash Your Trash” mascot, awarding possession of the sculpture to the “greenest business” every few months.
Type:
Poster

Session ID:
09E
Time/Location:
PH 156 Lobby, 12:00 - 12:50 PM
Presenter(s):
Melissa Thomas, Safaa Said
Title:
Quality Course Design - Using the QM Rubric to Building Quality Online and Hybrid Courses
Abstract:
(click to view)
Since 2005, Salisbury University has incorporated the Quality Matters rubric and standards in the development of online and hybrid courses. The new 2014-2015 rubric has been released and ID&D is has developed strategies and tips to guide faculty in developing their courses in alignment with each of the QM standards.
Type:
Poster

Session ID:
10
Time/Location:
PH 156, 1:00 - 1:25 PM
Presenter(s):
Diallo Sessoms
Title:
Maryland Open Source Textbook Initiative
Abstract:
(click to view)
With the cost of education steadily increasing since the 1970s and with loud outcries from students at several USM institutions, the University Maryland System is focusing on ways to reduce college cost for our students. One strategy focuses on books and supplies through the Maryland Open Source Textbook (MOST) Initiative. Faculty members participating in the USM MOST Initiative will share their experiences and the effect this has on faculty, students and the university.
Type:
25 Minute Presetation

Session ID:
11
Time/Location:
PH 258, 1:00 - 1:25 PM
Presenter(s):
Robert Kirsch, Eric Rittinger
Title:
Teaching Economic Inequality as Problem-Oriented Pedagogy
Abstract:
(click to view)
This session will describe Salisbury University's participation in the national Economic Inequality Initiative, a program coordinated by the American Democracy Project in conjunction with thirty selected schools across the United States. Recent civic engagement literature has shown an overall lack of knowledge among faculty of the extent and scope of economic inequality. In response, SU's initiative focuses on faculty development with the goal of building a pedagogical base of resources and support for teaching our students about economic inequality in ways that span disciplines, curricula, and makes the topic more broadly applicable to course topics. This session will describe the efforts of the initiative to support faculty in both acquiring a vision of the problem as well as designing innovate to address the problem in their classes.
Type:
25 Minute Presentation

Session ID:
12
Time/Location:
PH 274, 1:00 - 1:25 PM
Presenter(s):
Kelly Fiala, Jenny Toonstra and Donna Ritenour
Title:
Experiential Learning and Civic Engagement in Athletic Training Education
Abstract:
(click to view)
According to the Salisbury University Mission Statement, “Our highest purpose is to empower our students with the knowledge, skills, and core values that contribute to active citizenship, gainful employment, and life-long learning in a democratic society and interdependent world.” Seniors in the Athletic Training program are given the opportunity to develop the knowledge, skills and core values through the use of experiential learning opportunities. We will discuss one opportunity in which students coordinate medical services and coverage for the Annual Sea Gull Century Bike Tour. Students are responsible for conducting a needs assessment, developing an emergency action plan, recruiting and training medical volunteers, completing an inventory, and purchasing first aid supplies in preparation for this experience. Students are active participants in the implementation of the medical coverage on the day of the event. The success of the day is contingent on the student’s actions and effective communication with those responsible for the participant’s health and safety, including police, dispatch, hospital’s emergency personnel and local EMS first responders. This opportunity allows students to demonstrate competency in Health Care Administration which is a requirement for Athletic Training professionals. In addition, students gain valuable experiences developing partnerships with members of the Salisbury community. Through this process, students develop a sense of community, independence and ownership. The project culminates with a debriefing session which provides students an opportunity for reflection and critical thinking..
Type:
25 Minute Presentation

Session ID:
13
Time/Location:
PH 277, 1:00 - 1:25 PM
Presenter(s):
Sarah Surak, Aaron Hogue and members of the U-ASC committee
Title:
U-ASC: Supporting Sustainability Teaching and Research
Abstract:
(click to view)
The University Academic Sustainability Committee (U-ASC) is a newly formed, university-wide committee with the goal of encouraging and supporting sustainability education and research. This panel presentation will describe the mission of the committee as it relates to campus environmental commitments as well as how we define sustainability within the academic context. The presentation will encompass the importance of interdisciplinary and disciplinary efforts to encourage and support teaching topics of sustainability. The session will conclude with an audience-focused discussion, soliciting ideas and suggestions for campus initiatives.
Type:
25 Minute Presentation

Session ID:
22
Time/Location:
PH 275, 1:00 - 4:00 PM
Presenter(s):
Diane Illig, Michele Schlehofer and Kara French
Title:
Creating Safe Spaces for LGBTQI People - Being an Ally
Abstract:
(click to view)
Overview: The Safe Space workshop is an innovative, dynamic, hands-on approach to creating safe space for all; focusing specifically on the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Questioning and Intersex (LGBTQI) community. From the classroom bully to the unintentional exclusion by use of certain language, LGBTQI people frequently find themselves excluded and uncomfortable in a variety of settings. This workshop aims to reduce the often unwelcoming and even hostile environments in which LGBTQI people navigate in their daily lives. Workshop participants will explore their role and responsibility in creating a more welcoming environment at work, school, and in our communities. All attendees will leave the workshop with greater understanding and workable solutions for promoting Safe Spaces of Respect, Acceptance, and Support for all. Objectives: • Participants will develop an understanding of the lived experiences of LGBTQI people through current statistics and examples. • Participants will be able to identify sources of unwelcoming behaviors in a variety of settings. • Participants will become more familiar with and comfortable in using LGBTQI-inclusive terminology. • Participants will learn to dispel negative stereotypes and develop strategies to create more welcoming and inclusive environments for LGBTQI people. • Participants will be able to recognize many of the issues and scenarios that LGBTQI people experience in their workplace, community or school and formulate effective responses. Workshops: Training workshops are 3 hours for groups of 10 to 40 people and include a resource booklet for each participant.
Type:
Workshop - Separate Registration Required

Session ID:
14
Time/Location:
PH 156, 1:30 - 2:20 PM
Presenter(s):
Karl Maier, George Whitehead
Title:
Keeping it real...too real...or not real enough: Considerations for addressing basic climate change literacy across the student body.
Abstract:
(click to view)
Current trends in global warming and climatic change are expected to have increasingly significant impacts on ecosystems and society in years to come. As such, college students today will be faced with uncertain future challenges in many areas of life. Educating our students about basic physical and social factors related to climate change is therefore important to prepare them, and thus our society, for the future. But, how ready are students to learn about this topic? For some, the extent of changes occurring in our climate is either not believable, or proves to be overly stressful to contemplate. Other students may not see it as relevant to their lives or area of study. In this session, we will examine how students across campus are viewing this topic, and how ready they are to learn about it. Drawing on teaching experiences and recent campus-wide student survey results about climate change, we will consider if and what students want to learn about, how they prefer to learn, and factors that may influence their preparedness to learn, including major area of study, climate change beliefs and knowledge, and mental health vulnerabilities.
Type:
50 Minute Presentation

Session ID:
15A
Time/Location:
PH 258, 1:30 - 1:55 PM
Presenter(s):
Toran Hansen
Title:
Experiential Learning in Restorative Justice
Abstract:
(click to view)
This presentation will outline and examine experiential learning practices that I use in my restorative justice class. In particular, I will illustrate how I use in-class and take home assignments so that students can not only learn about but also experience restorative justice. These assignments include writing letters and conducting dialogue in circles. In addition, the potential uses of restorative justice are considered, as well as the congruence of restorative values with student value systems. These activities are all in-line with experiential learning theory.
Type:
25 Minute Presentation

Session ID:
16
Time/Location:
PH 274, 1:30 - 2:20 PM
Presenter(s):
Jennifer Cox
Title:
Mobile Apps Scavenger Hunt
Abstract:
(click to view)
"In the spirit of ""doing"" rather than just ""showing,"" students in my mobile journalism class use their cellular phones to accomplish several reporting objectives throughout the semester. To introduce them to basic multimedia reporting skills, students participate in a mobile app scavenger hunt, using mobile apps to report across the campus in real time. The activity eases students in to the new technologies in a way that is fun, interesting, familiar and non-threatening. During the activity, students are given a list of people to find and are sent out across campus in a race against each other. One example: Find someone who has studied abroad. This requires them to approach people they don’t know, gather information and report it accurately and quickly. While the applications for this activity are obvious for journalism, they could potentially be useful in other fields, as well. For example, art students could embark on a scavenger hunt using apps to find certain objects and explain their artistic value. Nursing students who need to learn how to interview patients could use apps to find and question people across campus. Business students could use the apps to pitch products to strangers and get their reactions for analysis. My presentation would explain the activity as I used it in class and then elaborate on potential uses for accomplishing learning objectives across other curricula. In a 25-minute session, I could explain the technique and show some examples. In a 50-minute presentation, I could actually involve the audience and do an app scavenger hunt during the presentation. "
Type:
Workshop

Session ID:
17
Time/Location:
PH 277, 1:30 - 2:20 PM
Presenter(s):
Lori DeWitt, Carey Haddock, Bill Nelson, and Reema Persad-Clem
Title:
Living Learning Communities: Lessons Learned & Best Practices
Abstract:
(click to view)
Living Learning Communities currently allow first semester freshmen to be housed and take classes with other students who share their interests. For instructors, it is an amazing opportunity to connect with students and connect those students with the content of your courses in new and exciting ways. By providing funding for field trips, guest speakers, and hands-on activities, LLCs give professors the means to make the world their classroom. This session will feature an interactive panel of veteran LLC instructors who will discuss the triumphs and challenges of this program and how it has impacted their teaching in all of their courses. Whether you are considering starting a new LLC or you have been teaching in an LLC and want to learn more about what others are doing and how they are doing it, this is the session for you!
Type:
Panel Discussion

Session ID:
15B
Time/Location:
PH 258, 1:55 PM - 2:20 PM
Presenter(s):
Vitus Ozoke
Title:
From Table D’hôte to à la Carte: Using Kolb’s Model to Design an Experiential Learning Classroom
Abstract:
(click to view)
"Our students come into the classroom with different learning styles. Some do very well when materials are presented orally; others are at their best with visual delivery; others require physical movement and other activities; and for others, they are more solitary than social learners. That these learning differences exist is not news; after all, theories of diverse learning styles have been around for as long as learning itself. What should be breaking news, however, is how we have ignored these theories in the way we have designed learning in higher education. The typical higher education classroom is comparable to a table d’hôte restaurant, with set meals and set menus. In such a classroom, students, regardless of their dominant learning style (“taste”), are either forced through learning activities that are not consistent with their dominant learning taste – assuming the design has “something for everyone”, or they are not even offered activities that match their taste. Both are a disservice. The first subjects students to boredom in the classroom; the second leaves huge learning gap. Higher education “restaurants” would better meet the needs of their “customers” if they operated à la carte. Students should have a choice of learning activities that meet their unique and specific dominant learning style. Using Kolb’s model of experiential learning, this paper offers suggestions on using learning style inventories to evaluate students’ preferred learning styles, and designing a learning “restaurant” that is à la carte to the taste and need of the students – rather than table d’hôte. "
Type:
25 Minute Presentation

Session ID:
18
Time/Location:
PH 156, 2:30 - 3:20 PM
Presenter(s):
Melissa Thomas, Safaa Said, Lori DeWitt, Diana Wagner
Title:
A few strokes on the Canvas - Highlights from Spring Canvas Pilot
Abstract:
(click to view)
At the time of the conference, we will be a month into the Spring Pilot of the Canvas learning managements system. This session will highlight features of the Canvas system being used by faculty within their Spring courses. We will also highlight the successes and challenges found thus far with the Canvas system.
Type:
Panel Discussion

Session ID:
19
Time/Location:
PH 258, 2:30 - 3:20 PM
Presenter(s):
Karen Olmstead, Sarah Surak
Title:
Best practices in general education and sustainability. How does sustainability fit within our learning outcomes?
Abstract:
(click to view)
General education curricula primarily serve to enable the development of essential skills, knowledge, abilities, and habits of mind that support success across the disciplines and in the professional and personal lives of college graduates. Often, general education curricula are organized around engaging themes which provide for connection-making across disciplines and as well as supporting the development of critical thinking, ethical reasoning, communication and quantitative skills as well as knowledge of human culture and the natural world. On several campuses, environmental or sustainability-related themes are part of the general education curriculum. We will present models of sustainability-related general education curricula from other campuses and how these map onto SU’s Learning Outcomes. We will then ask for a dialogue among the session participants regarding the value and feasibility of such a general education model at SU.
Type:
50 Minute Presentation

Session ID:
20A
Time/Location:
PH 274, 2:30 - 2:55 PM
Presenter(s):
Cristina Cammarano
Title:
Turning your class in a community of inquiry
Abstract:
(click to view)
"A community of inquiry is a "" deliberative society engaged in multidimensional thinking"" according to the definition offered by Matthew Lipman. While lectures can provide in depth analysis of a subject from one single point of view (normally the perspective of the lecturer), discussion of the same subject from multiple points of view can be enriching and motivating. Structuring a class as a community of inquiry (from now on, COI) allows students to practice procedures of self-critical, exploratory and dialogical inquiry. In my presentation I will describe COIs, I will share some pedagogical presupposition which animate the practice, and will offer two examples from the Humanities and the Sciences that illustrate community of inquiries in classroom practice."
Type:
25 Minute Presentation

Session ID:
21
Time/Location:
PH 277, 2:30 - 3:20 PM
Presenter(s):
George Whitehead, Mark Bushman - Ward Museum Chavonda Carr, Wicomico County Health Department, Erin Sheehan, Epoch Dream Center
Title:
Building ties with the community: Service-Learning and AmeriCorps
Abstract:
(click to view)
"This panel discussion will include an explanation of AmeriCorps and in particular the AmeriCorps program at Salisbury University, Shore Corps/PALS, and service-learning. Specifically it will relate how AmeriCorps and service-learning build ties with the community. Consequently the panel will include representatives from various community sites that partner with Shore Corps/PALS. The sites will be diverse in terms of size and location. In this context we will present ideas about standards for the quality practice of service-learning that are incorporated into the Shore Corps/PALS program. These standards include meaningful projects that address real community needs. Panel members will delineate the community needs their AmeriCorps members are addressing and their service activities. In addition to their service, students also have various learning experiences designed to make them more effective leaders and members at their sites. To that end we require AmeriCorps members to enroll in IDIS 280 in the fall and spring semesters. A hallmark of service-learning is reflection. Ideas for reflection that incorporate multiple intelligences will be offered. Effective service-learning programs also monitor progress. Panelist will discuss how this is accomplished. Other characteristics of effective programs include duration and intensity. To that end, students investigate community needs, prepare for service, and then engage in action, reflection, demonstrate learning and impact and finally celebrate their service. Attendees will then have an opportunity to work through an exercise where they decide on a concept or concepts in their courses that could be taught using service-learning. They will be asked to identify the community need relative to the concept and then specify the type of agency where students might serve. At the end of the session participants will have a concrete plan to include service-learning in one or more of their classes. "
Type:
Panel Discussion

Session ID:
20B
Time/Location:
PH 274, 2:55 - 3:20 PM
Presenter(s):
Kim Quillin
Title:
Teaching Students the Skill of Making and Using Visual Models to Reason
Abstract:
(click to view)
Humans are visual animals. Seeing is central to learning. One way to prompt students to engage their eyes (and mind’s eye) in learning is to ask them to draw visual models as reasoning tools. Students can use model-based reasoning to solve word problems in math, to solve vector problems in physics, to predict monetary trends in economics, to track the inheritance of genes in biology, to understand relationships among allies in history, and so much more. Yet research in many disciplines has shown that novice students tend to struggle with visual model-based reasoning. In this presentation, I will outline the problems that tend to thwart novice learners, then offer three types of interventions from the literature to move students toward expert-like reasoning. The interventions address: (1) affect, (2) visual literacy, and (3) visual reasoning skills. Overall, the goal of the presentation is to increase the visibility of drawing models as a teachable skill in any discipline, and to share a tool kit that may help instructors to promote successful problem-solving in their classrooms.
Type:
25 Minute Presentation