2014 Teaching & Learning Conference

Search Sessions

Session ID:
01
Time/Location:
PH 156, 9:00 - 9:50 AM
Presenter(s):
Dr. Randall Groth
Title:
Building Synergistic Relationships between Teaching and Research
Abstract:
(click to view)
Synergy occurs when two or more things interact so the net effect is greater than the sum of the parts. Teaching and research have great potential for this sort of interaction if research is considered a part of teaching rather than apart from teaching. This talk will consist of thoughts on fostering productive interactions between teaching and research. Examples presented during the talk will focus specifically on the Salisbury University context for teaching and research. A variety of strategies for gathering classroom data will be considered, such as quantitative knowledge measures, qualitative task responses, and transcripts of online student conversations about academic tasks and readings. Collaboration with colleagues will be discussed as a means for analyzing data, framing research questions, and designing studies. Peer-reviewed venues for publishing classroom research will be identified. Thoughts on getting started with the process of integrating teaching and research will be shared and potential obstacles along the way will be considered. It will be argued that as productive relationships between teaching and research are fostered, classroom research can help improve teaching, and teaching can help faculty develop and carry out robust research agendas. The synergy that results from this sort of interaction between teaching and research will be portrayed as a vital component of the continuous improvement of teaching.
Type:
Keynote

Session ID:
02
Time/Location:
PH 274, 10:00-10:50 AM
Presenter(s):
Chrys Egan, Michèle Schlehofer ,Jody Morrison, Diana Reinoso Parnell
Title:
Community-Based Research in and out of the Classroom: SU Course Models for Applied Student Research with Local Organizations
Abstract:
(click to view)
Community-based research blends the knowledge of local citizens and organizations with the scholarship of university faculty, staff, and students. This collaborative research effort is conducted with, by, and for communities to address relevant public issues through a social justice perspective of equality. This presentation first explains community-based research. The panelists then illustrate a long-term community research partnership involving faculty and students from several academic areas. To conclude, the session provides a call to action and resources to enable faculty to integrate community research into their courses. Community-Research Fundamentals: Applied, community-based research projects present unique opportunities for residents, service organizations, local businesses, university faculty, and our students to interact with, learn about, and positively affect the communities in which we live. Research is a key component in strong community development by establishing and prioritizing needs, providing essential services, securing funding, and evaluating programs. SU Course Models: Community research with the Wicomico Partnership for Families and Children serves as a model for how Salisbury University members can collaborate with local organizations. Panelists will present their course designs from Interdisciplinary Studies, Communication, and Psychology classes from Fall 2012 through Spring 2014. These student research projects range from independent studies to courses of 30 students, employing methods from random-digit phone surveys to personal key-informant interviews, and sharing outcomes with audiences from the Wicomico Partnership to the SU Student Research Conference. Call to Action: University-community research partnerships, if carefully cultivated, promote social justice, strengthen the university’s ties to the region, connect faculty scholarship to local issues, allow interdisciplinary collaboration, and provide students with experiential learning toward marketable skills. Inspired faculty seeking to implement such projects in their courses will receive resources enabling them to do so. Provided materials draw from panelist experiences, community research centers at other universities, and public advocacy organizations.
Type:
Panel Discussion

Session ID:
03A
Time/Location:
PH 275, 10:00-10:25 AM
Presenter(s):
David Rieck
Title:
Classroom Flipping in General Chemistry
Abstract:
(click to view)
I will describe my experiences using a “flipped class” approach in a General Chemistry lecture. In a traditional lecture format, students listen as the professor explains problems and works examples and then they leave to attempt similar problems on their own. There are several problems with this approach. First, a lecture is inherently passive for the students making it easy for them to lose focus and miss significant portions of the material. Also, a lecture that is paced appropriately for the average student will simply be too fast-paced for a significant number of students. These students leave class confused, and usually with poor comprehension. Finally, when students attempt to work problems outside of class they often do not even know where to begin. They quickly get frustrated and discouraged and too often give up. In contrast, in a flipped class, lecture material is presented online. Students can work through the lecture at a pace that best suits them, viewing and reviewing the material as needed. Then, during class time, students work in groups to answer progressively more challenging questions. Students are actively engaged during class, and I am free to move from group to group providing hints and encouragement. I will explain how I have been using the flipped class approach in General Chemistry, and I will relate some of the aspects of class flipping that I find helpful and others that I find frustrating.
Type:
25 Minute Presentation

Session ID:
04
Time/Location:
PH 156, 10:00-10:50 AM
Presenter(s):
Karl Maier, Mark Walter, George Whitehead, Elizabeth Ragan
Title:
“With a Little Help from our Friends”: Toward a Transdisciplinary Approach to Sustainability and Climate Change
Abstract:
(click to view)
In teaching about problems related to environmental sustainability it is often important to consider a range of disciplinary perspectives. This approach is perhaps necessary when attempting to understand the causes and solutions pertaining to climate change facing society today, as there are complex and interrelated social and physical systems involved. In this plenary session, we invite a discussion among faculty from different disciplines on how to best address this topic in a multidisciplinary or transdisciplinary way. Such comprehensive approaches may require considerable effort, but hold promise for more fully addressing problems in a way that is engaging and stimulating for both students and instructors. This session will provide an opportunity to share experiences, best practices, and challenges in teaching about the topics of sustainability and climate change across disciplines.
Type:
Sustainability Track

Session ID:
03B
Time/Location:
PH 275, 10:25-10:50 AM
Presenter(s):
Eric Rittinger
Title:
Introducing Students to the 'Flipped' Classroom Through Strategic Interaction Games
Abstract:
(click to view)
Much has been written about the benefits of a “flipped” classroom, in which students actively participate in class exercises rather than passively receive information. Simulations are a common way to reorient the classroom, since they encourage students to learn by doing. But how can instructors successfully conduct simulations at the beginning of the course, when students know little about the subject? Strategic interaction games, I argue, are simulations well suited to novices. Unlike role-playing games, which demand substantive knowledge of the scenario to be performed, strategic interaction games only require familiarity with a few basic rules. These games both prepare students for the structure of a “flipped” course and initiate the actual process of project-based learning. Specifically, they give students first-hand experience with concepts, problems, and patterns that they can draw on later when completing assignments, contributing to class discussions, or participating in other simulations. Second, as simplifications of real-world situations, they can prompt students to consider the benefits and limitations of theoretical models. Third, they “break the ice,” which facilitates future simulations and discussions. And finally, by using competition and the prospect of bonus points to motivate participation, they invest students in the course material, set a precedent for classroom engagement, and establish the kinds of norms that allow a “flipped” classroom to achieve its educational objectives. I elaborate these benefits by drawing on my experiences running the game “Diplomacy” in my Introduction to International Relations course.
Type:
25 Minute Presentation

Session ID:
05A
Time/Location:
PH 274, 11:00-11:25 AM
Presenter(s):
Leonard Arvi
Title:
Market driven curriculum & student success
Abstract:
(click to view)
Student graduation rate and employability is big concern in today's economy. To address the issue of ensuring student employment, I utilize several different techniques. Some of them are doing interviews with employers about student skills, critical thinking and writing assignments, using technology to enhance student employment - LinkedIn, Guidebook app, etc. By addressing the market needs with appropriate student skills we can ensure graduates are gainful employed.
Type:
25 Minute Presentation

Session ID:
06A
Time/Location:
PH 275, 11:00-11:25 AM
Presenter(s):
Tom Pellinger
Title:
Team Debates: Active Learning in a Graduate Physiology Course
Abstract:
(click to view)
The process of formal debate has existed for thousands of years and debate as a teaching tool dates back to the ancient Greeks. In the modern university setting, lecture is the most common instructional technique, as the use of debate as a teaching method is most common in argumentation courses or as part of preparation for formal debate competitions. However, research indicates that formal debate can be incorporated into the teaching of a variety of subjects, ranging from geography to sociology. Along those lines, evidence suggests that, compared to lecture, the use of in-class debate leads to enhanced higher-order thinking and oral communication skills. Moreover, despite the initial anxiety expressed by some students, most rate debate as more enjoyable than lecture. In an effort to maximize active engagement, critical thinking, and clear communication skills of my students, I have incorporated structured in-class debate into my graduate course Cardiopulmonary Aspects of Physiology. Once students have learned some core concepts in cardiovascular and respiratory physiology, they are asked to choose between two somewhat controversial topics and are subsequently divided into two debate teams, each arguing in support of one “side” of the issue being debated. This process requires them to work together to construct and execute evidence-based arguments in an assertive, yet courteous manner. Based on the feedback thus far, these debates have served to solidify complex physiological concepts, while making my students more comfortable explaining these concepts to others.
Type:
25 Minute Presentation

Session ID:
07
Time/Location:
PH 156, 11:00-11:50 AM
Presenter(s):
Sarah Surak, Wayne Shelton, Reema Persad-Clem, Tami Ransom
Title:
“There’s a Place”: The Campus and Community as a Classroom - Utilizing Place-based Teaching
Abstract:
(click to view)
While teaching and learning traditionally occurs within the walls of the classroom, the infrastructure of the campus and environment of the local community can serve as a "living laboratory" for the application of course concepts. This workshop describes the benefits of using the campus and community as a space for testing and applying sustainability concepts and practices. Three presenters will describe their experience with this form of learning. If time allows we will then break up into groups to brainstorm how faculty might utilize these same techniques.
Type:
Sustainability Track

Session ID:
05B
Time/Location:
PH 274, 11:25-11:50 AM
Presenter(s):
Derya Kulavuz-Onal
Title:
Technology-Infused Projects in Developing Student Teachers’ Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge
Abstract:
(click to view)
Based on Shulman’s (1986, 1987) pedagogical content knowledge framework, Mishra and Koehler’s (2006) Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK) framework asserts that in 21st century teaching, teachers need another body of knowledge in order to make informed pedagogically-sound decisions when integrating technology into instruction. As such, integrating technology for the sake of technology, or just because it is “cool”, does not make a teacher’s technology integration effective, purposeful, or meaningful for student learning. Therefore, teachers need to have an understanding of the complex intersections between technology, pedagogy, and content before they aim to integrate technology. Such need also compels us, as teacher educators, to rethink our teacher education practices in order to be able to provide student teachers opportunities where they will need to negotiate how technology, pedagogy, and content interact, and how one influences the other when planning instruction, which in turn, will help them develop their TPACK. Geared from this understanding, I created technology-infused projects for student teachers in my TESOL classes to give an opportunity for them to develop their TPACK ,and have an understanding of how technology, pedagogy, and content interact. In this presentation, I will first give an overview of the TPACK framework and how it informs pedagogically-sound technology integration in instruction. After that, I will give a detailed description of the technology-infused projects that I have done in the past. For example, one such project aimed at student teachers’ developing technology-infused culture-teaching materials for English language learners, while another aimed at creating a digital storytelling project (or a digital video) about student teachers’ philosophy of writing and teaching writing. I will showcase how I created and implemented these projects, share sample projects from student teachers, and point out their learning gains in order to justify how such projects can help develop student teachers’ TPACK.
Type:
25 Minute Presentation

Session ID:
06B
Time/Location:
PH 275, 11:25-11:50 AM
Presenter(s):
Jennifer Cox
Title:
Talking All at Once: Managing Simultaneous Face-to-Face and Online Discussions in the Classroom
Abstract:
(click to view)
Discussion in the classroom has long been a favorite tool for learning among educators and students, while technologies, such as laptops and mobile devices, have become more of a distraction. By combining the two, educators can improve learning outcomes, allowing students to share information and converse in ways that are familiar for them without interrupting the richness of the discussion. In my Mobile Journalism class, students read articles about various topics in preparation for in-class debates. Students were separated into two even groups: an inner and an outer circle. The inner circle participated in a face-to-face discussion of the materials using no mobile devices. They contributed a minimum of five comments demonstrating their understanding of the material and their ability to follow the conversation. The outer circle was not permitted to speak, participating instead on Twitter using a common hashtag. The outer circle followed the inner circle conversation and tweeted 5-10 times, including both direct quotes from speakers and their own opinions about the topic. Outer circle students were also required to have their own conversation on Twitter, addressing each other personally using the @ symbol and the group as a whole using the class hashtag. Halfway through the class period, the circles switched sides and repeated the activity addressing different discussion questions. Following the class, students used Storify.com to build an article exploring key arguments from the discussion. Students were required to use at least 10 of their classmates’ tweets in the article, as well as their own text as transitions between points. The method proved more effective than regular note taking, in that students not only listened to the information being shared but also processed it and added critical analysis. The opportunity to learn from each other’s differing perspectives and backgrounds deepened their understanding of the discussion material.
Type:
25 Minute Presentation

Session ID:
08
Time/Location:
PH 274, 12:30-12:55 PM
Presenter(s):
Kim Quillin
Title:
Stuck in the Mud? How to Help Students Overcome Misconceptions
Abstract:
(click to view)
Do you ever feel like you teach a concept clearly in class and yet many students still flub it on the exam (even students who are really trying to learn)? And then you reteach the concept and students still struggle? This process is clearly frustrating for students and teachers alike—everyone feels stuck in the mud. One of the teaching/learning problems in this scenario is that students are not blank slates; they come to class with misconceptions that can be very resistant to change. In this session we will discuss three steps to tackle this problem: First, we must IDENTIFY what misconceptions our students are bringing into our classrooms. Second, we must design classroom experiences that prompt students to CONFRONT and revise their misconceptions so that they can learn. Finally, we must ASSESS our students to determine if they have successfully overcome their misconceptions.
Type:
25 Minute Presentation

Session ID:
09
Time/Location:
PH 277, 12:30-12:55 PM
Presenter(s):
Lori Carmack
Title:
On a Foray into Clickers
Abstract:
(click to view)
In the spring of 2013, Salisbury University’s Office of Instructional Design and Delivery held an inspiring mini-conference on TurningPoint technology. Attending the mini-conference motivated me to implement Classroom Voting Technology via TurningPoint into two of my courses in the Fall of 2013. In this presentation I will discuss my first experience using Clickers in the classroom. I will detail some suggestions from the mini-conference that were particularly useful, present some TurningPoint slides and ideas that I found helpful for feedback and student engagement, and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of using Classroom Voting technology.
Type:
25 Minute Presentation

Session ID:
10
Time/Location:
PH 156, 12:30-12:55 PM
Presenter(s):
Melissa Thomas, Veera Holdai, Ron Gutberlet
Title:
Integrating MOOC Content in SU Courses - a USM Gates/Ithaka Study
Abstract:
(click to view)
During the Fall 2013 semester, faculty teaching MATH 155 and BIOL 101 participated in a USM Gates/Ithaka sponsored study on the integration of MOOC material into a tradional and hybrid course. MATH 155 integrated content from a Coursera MOOC course as well as content from their Pearson textbook. BIOL 101 integrated content not from a MOOC directly, but from Carnegie Mellon's Open Learning Intiative (OLI). This panel will describe the study, how the content affected the design and delivery of their courses as well as student and faculty feedback.
Type:
Panel Discussion

Session ID:
11A
Time/Location:
PH 274, 1:00-1:25 PM
Presenter(s):
Vitus Ozoke
Title:
Required Books; Optional Reading: Strategies for Bridging the Disconnect
Abstract:
(click to view)
For most courses, instructors require their students to buy course materials, mainly textbooks. When these materials are required, and not just recommended, it underscores how important they are to the instructor, and potentially to the students, in the instructor’s judgment, for effective course interaction. Because these materials can sometimes run into hundreds of dollars, the decision to require students to buy them is not one that instructors take too casually. The fact that many, if not most, students show up on the first day of class with the required books shows, presumably, that they too understand the importance of these books as critical supplemental reference materials for the course. Unfortunately, however, it has been the experience of many instructors – myself included – that many of our students do not utilize these course books in the learning process. A student once told me, jokingly, that her interpretation of “required books” in the course syllabus is that she is required to buy the books, but there is nothing in the syllabus that requires her to read them! A visit to the university’s bookstore reveals a very disturbing trend. The distinction between “new” and “used” books is increasingly becoming a difficult one to make, as a lot of the so-called “used” (buyback) books look very new, showing no visible signs of having been ever “used”. This is indeed a disturbing trend. How do instructors get their students to come to class prepared by reading the assigned readings for the class? This presentation offers a number of innovative strategies for not just encouraging and motivating, but ‘forcing’, students to extend the requirement of “required” to reading, and not just buying, the books.
Type:
25 Minute Presentation

Session ID:
12A
Time/Location:
PH 277, 1:00-1:25 PM
Presenter(s):
Jacques Koko
Title:
Integrating Philosophical Perspectives of "Ubuntu" and "Cogito Ergo Sum" in Teaching and Learning
Abstract:
(click to view)
"Cogito Ergo Sum" (from French philosopher René Descartes) means ‘I think, so I am’. This philosophy emphasizes the importance of a rational ego. Ubuntu from the Southern African Xhosa language means ‘I am because you are’. This philosophy conceptualizes the importance and weigh of the community on subjectivity. Integrating "Ubuntu" and "Cogito Ergo Sum" in the teaching and learning process requires that the teachers present their students with a rewarding balance between individual assignments and group tasks. For the past seven years, I have been using this approach to teaching and learning with successful outcomes.
Type:
25 Minute Presentation

Session ID:
13
Time/Location:
PH 156, 1:00-1:50 PM
Presenter(s):
Shawn McEntee
Title:
“Here Comes the Sun”: Lighting the way for a Sustainable Future through our Teaching
Abstract:
(click to view)
A long-standing axiom is the idea that sustainable environments, sustainable economies, sustainable communities, and sustainable people are mutually reinforcing and deeply interdependent. This reality seems under-recognized amidst the critical state of higher education today. There is a need prepare our social systems for an increasingly uncertain future. With the looming prospect of climate change, words like enduring, adaptable, flexible, and resilient are becoming as important as ‘green’ or ‘sustainable’. Tony Wagner, Harvard Education Professor, for example, modified Tony Robbins’ '7 Habits of Highly Effective People' to identify skills that today's students need to be successful. Not surprisingly, this list includes words like flexible, effective, adaptable, and communication – which reflect the traditionally valued skills and characteristics associated with a good liberal arts education, and the goals of our General Education program. We play an important role in preparing students for a challenging future that is broadly sustainable. What can we do in our short 15 week semesters to make them flexible, adaptable, resilient and durable?
Type:
Sustainability Track

Session ID:
11B
Time/Location:
PH 274, 1:25-1:50 PM
Presenter(s):
Brent Zaprowski
Title:
A review of current and new e-book possibilities
Abstract:
(click to view)
Digital books continue to revolutionize the textbook industry. In this talk I will discuss my experiences with publishing digital textbooks. I will also discuss some new and exciting ways that instructors can provide course content to their students in a variety of printed and digital formats while keeping student costs down.
Type:
25 Minute Presentation

Session ID:
12B
Time/Location:
PH 277, 1:25-1:50 PM
Presenter(s):
Angela Covelli
Title:
Respectful Discipline in Every Classroom
Abstract:
(click to view)
Respectful Discipline in Every Classroom Every teacher and administrator dreams of students being on task and ready to learn in classrooms with which they are associated. In every situation, whether in school or at home caring rules and structure need to be present for students be on task, effectively learn and respond positively. As educators we can no longer assume that students come to us ready and willing to learn. Our society has changed drastically and so has our youth. Just as we teach academics we must also do this with managing behavior. Respectful discipline techniques give actual Time to Teach for educators. In contrast, the discipline tools taught are the students’ responsibility and not the educators. With this program 80-90% of low level misbehaviors will be gone. Time to Teach is about classroom management for K-12 teachers and administrators. Caring is Key but it comes with boundaries. Dr. Madeline Hunter said, “Kids don’t care how much you know until they know how much you care.” Find out what type of disciplinarian you are: Authoritarian, Permissive and Authoritative, and adapt our strategies to fit your style. Conflict is an essential part of maturation. Your students are going to take you on. It is in a child’s nature to challenge authority. Let’s learn how to proceed right past this and continue with your teaching. We must teach the behaviors we want systematically the same way we teach core subjects. Learn self- control for your students and yourself. This program encompasses when to walk away from behavior or respond to it later on the student’s time. Avoid power struggles, learn” Teach-To’s” and the arrangement of space to increase student learning and time on task. Early intervention and rapid decision making by the educator keeps momentum for learning in the classroom in order to meet instructional goals.
Type:
25 Minute Presentation

Session ID:
14A
Time/Location:
PH 274, 2:00-2:25 PM
Presenter(s):
Stephen Habay
Title:
Integrating online homework into courses: An example from organic chemistry
Abstract:
(click to view)
Online homework systems are becoming increasingly popular learning tools for students and assessment tools for faculty. Both independent and textbook-specific providers offer services for a variety of subjects including chemistry, physics, economics, mathematics, astronomy and more. This talk will examine how and why to incorporate homework websites into your courses as well as some pros and cons to using online homework systems. As one example, implementation of the online homework system, Sapling Learning, into the organic chemistry courses at SU will be discussed.
Type:
25 Minute Presentation

Session ID:
15
Time/Location:
PH 274, 2:00-3:50 PM
Presenter(s):
Michele Schlehofer, Diane Illig, Paula Morris
Title:
Safe Spaces Training: Creating Safe Spaces in School, Work, and Community
Abstract:
(click to view)
Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer/questioning people (LGBTQ) continue to experience significant discrimination at their schools and in their workplaces. The Gay, Lesbian, and Straight Education Network consistently reports that LGBTQ students are disproportionately harassed and bullied in comparison to their straight peers, resulting in lowered GPAs and increased class absences (GLSEN, 2011). Likewise, LGBTQ adults continue to face discriminatory workplace settings, the exposure to which results in decreased productivity, less organizational commitment, and more absenteeism and turnover on the job. Allies—people who are not LGBTQ themselves—often play a vital role in supporting LGBTQ people and in mitigating both discriminatory practices and the negative effect they have on learning and employment outcomes. This session provides introductory-level training on becoming an LGBTQ ally. As a part of the training, participants will be provided with current LGBTQ terminology, information on the impact of discrimination on LGBTQ people, and will learn about the vital role of allies in mitigating this discrimination. Participants will leave with a better understanding of the blatant and subtle discriminatory practices against LGBTQ people and the importance of being an LGBTQ ally and creating “safe space” for LGBTQ people on campus. Participants will engage in a variety of structured activities to meet the training goals. As part of the session, participants will learn strategies for combatting discrimination and bias in their workplaces and classrooms, and will work collaboratively to develop an ally resource list. Additional resources and reading materials will be provided. Those attendees willing to make a commitment to being an ally will receive a “Safe Space” sticker to display in their workspace.
Type:
Workshop

Session ID:
16
Time/Location:
PH 156, 2:00-2:50 PM
Presenter(s):
Sustainability Track Presenters
Title:
“Come Together”: Expanding and Deepening the Discussion on Sustainability and Teaching
Abstract:
(click to view)
In this plenary session, presenters from the sustainability track today will facilitate guided discussion that addresses questions and adds to the discourse on themes covered in earlier sessions on sustainability and teaching. Consider attending if you were unable to attend prior sessions, or if you wish to question, develop, share, or just listen to ideas in this area.
Type:
Sustainability Track

Session ID:
14B
Time/Location:
PH 274, 2:25-2:50 PM
Presenter(s):
Anita Brown
Title:
Exam Credit for Getting Help
Abstract:
(click to view)
In general chemistry courses, to be successful, a significant number of students need clarification and/or guidance outside of the classroom. In order for students to have ample opportunity to receive this guidance, chemistry faculty here at SU hold office hours and numerous help sessions. However, it seemed a number of students would not seek any assistance until they had been unsuccessful on at least one exam. Hoping to generate a classroom culture where discussion of concepts and problems with a professor outside of class was typical, I began giving students points on their exams for working with a faculty member outside of class time. Prior to each exam, I require students to attend two office or help session hours. In addition, prior to each exam, I require students to attend one concept session. In a concept session, one challenging topic is explored. In this presentation I will discuss the concept sessions, the logistics of assigning credit, and the overall student response to these requirements. I will investigate whether these requirements seem to clearly impact student performance.
Type:
25 Minute Presentation