The Thomas E. Bellavance Honors Program
Holloway Hall

Spring 2014 Courses

Fall 2013 Course Brochure (PDF)

* * *

Issues in Social Sciences

Political Arguments Alive 
HONR 112
MWF 9:00-9:50 am (041)
MWF 10:00-10:50 am (042)
Lauren Hill

In this class, we will study Aristotle and Cicero to understand the structure  and art of American political speeches.  We will start by examining how   figures such as Abraham Lincoln, Martin Luther King, and John F. Kennedy, set the stage for Bill Clinton, George W. Bush, and Barack Obama.  In the second half of the semester, we will explore how political language infiltrates everyday life, music, advertisements and marketing, billboards, television, film, clothing, art, sports, and more.  By analyzing the language of politics, we will begin to understand how politics are alive in our everyday lives.

Satisfies General Education Requirement Group IIIB

 

* * *

Issues in Social Sciences

Lost Generation: Cultural Reverberations of War in the Modern Age
HONR 112-151 Th 4:30-7:15 pm
Joan Wallace

 The political and social atmosphere of the Western world following World War I served to define cultural modernism in terms of how people saw themselves in relation to their seemingly once knowable cosmos.  This course will examine the impact of the “Great War” on the original “Lost Generation”—caught in a cultural limbo—through an examination of the literature, art,    music, and cinema of the age.

Satisfies General Education Requirement Group IIIB

  

* * *

Issues in Natural Sciences:

Aliens Among Us! The Ecology and Impacts of Introduced Species
HONR 212-041 MWF 2:00-2:50 pm
Tami Ransom

Introduced species can greatly alter ecosystems and are one of the primary culprits for decline of native organisms.  While most people have heard the term “invasive  species,” many of us are unaware of how common invasive species are.  For example, many types of earthworms and lady bugs are not native to the U.S.!  Invasion biology is a relatively new field of research, but has gained prominence in recent years due to several high profile and economically costly invasive species (e.g. zebra mussels, West Nile Virus, etc.).  In this course, we will use primary scientific articles, popular literature, and numerous interesting case studies to understand the characteristics of invasive species, explore hypotheses regarding the causes of biological invasions, and examine complex issues surrounding invasive species management.

Satisfies General Education Requirement IVB

 

* * *

Issues in Natural Sciences:

Statistics through Baseball
HONR 212-042 T/Th 11:00-12:15 pm
Lee May

This course introduces students to the role of mathematics in culture by introducing students to the concepts of probability and statistics by means of playing with baseball statistics. It is intended for students whose major area of study does not have specific requirements in mathematics and statistics, and who have an interest in baseball.

Satisfies General Education Requirement IVB

  

* * *

Interdisciplinary Seminar:

Haunted America: Trauma and Memory in American Histories of Place
HONR 311-041 MW 3:00-4:15 pm
James Buss

This course takes seriously intersections between academic methodologies and the voices of the dead as they speak to us in the  present—whether captured in archives, voiced in the fictional stories of literary authors, or venerated in commemorative spaces.  This course emphasizes multi-disciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches in order to explore the role of ghosts, hauntings, and trauma in American literature, architecture, and urban planning.  These approaches will aid students in being more aware of how histories of place are also histories of haunting and mourning.  (The course includes a class excursion to New York City).

Cross lists with HIST 490. Satisfies General Education Requirement IIB.

 

* * *

Interdisciplinary Seminar:

Sport and Science: Physiology, Doping, and Ethics in Sports
HONR 311-042
MWF 11:00-11:50 am
Scott Mazzetti

Perhaps at no other time in the history of sport has science played a larger role in the concept of the modern athlete.  This course examines Physiology,    Metabolism, the Ethics of Participation in Sports, as well as Sports Sociology.  Students will conduct research on scientific influences on the modern sports world and perform simple lab tests in addition to examining basic performance enhancement techniques, such as water-loading, limb cooling, etc.

 

* * *

Interdisciplinary Seminar:

Writing the Chesapeake: Translating Science and Nature into             Compelling Prose
HONR 311-151 T 4:30-7:15 pm
Tom Horton

Award-winning Chesapeake Bay writer Tom Horton will focus on writing short essays through the lenses of marine ecology and land-water equality   relationships, based on his forty years of chronicling our region’s struggle to  co-exist sustainably with one of the world’s most productive estuaries.

  

* * *

Interdisciplinary Seminar:

 History of Nursing
HONR 311-043/NURS 415-010
M 3:00-6:00 pm
William T. Campbell

 

* * *

Honors Junior Research Project

HONR 312-041
James Burton

Honors students complete a research or creative project in a 300-400 level course of their choosing (this does not have to be an honors course) and will present their research or creative project at a public symposium or conference. One credit, pass/fail.

 

* * *

Honors Thesis Preparation

HONR 490-041
James Buss

In Honor 490, before students begin work on their thesis, students select a thesis committee comprised of a thesis advisor and two readers. The mentor and one reader are chosen from the student's major department. The other reader is selected from faculty in one's school. Additionally, students do preliminary research on their topic and write a two page prospectus (which must be approved by their committee) describing what they hope to accomplish in their thesis. In addition to meeting as necessary with their mentor, students will meet together regularly with the Honors program liaison to discuss progress and problems. One credit, pass/fail.

 

* * *

Honors Thesis

HONR 495-041
James Buss

The Honors thesis is a three or four credit, focused, in-depth project in one's major field. What distinguishes an Honors thesis from a research paper in a regular classroom is the willingness of the student to go beyond the classroom and to assume the responsibilities associated with commitment to scholarship.

* * *