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Public Humanities By-Laws

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About

Native American History Month

Women's History Month

Past Event - Native American Heritage Month 2016

Past Event - Women's History Month 2016

Past Event - African-American History Month 2016

Past Event - Native American Heritage Month 2015

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Mission Statement 

The Fulton Public Humanities Program (FPHP) exists to support, organize, and develop academic programs and events that promote public awareness and understanding of marginalized groups, moments, and events in history (up to the present). It provides opportunities for programs that possess curricular and academic value in the recovery, commemoration, and study of human experience in all its complex diversity using the unique methods and core perspectives of the Humanities.* 

The Fulton Public Humanities Program’s core responsibilities are to:

  •  Organize, sponsor, and promote academic events (such as but not limited to keynote speakers, lectures, exhibitions) related to chronological areas that are typically underserved, and marginalized regional, ethnic, cultural, sexual, gender, and racial identities.
  •  Organize, sponsor, and promote academic events related to the celebration of “heritage” and “history” months such as African-American History Month, Native American Heritage Month, and Women's History Month, and supplement existing curricular and extracurricular programming on the Salisbury University campus.  
  • Provide assistantship opportunities for Graduate students and undergraduate internships in the Humanities, public history, and event organization.
  • Provide resources for Faculty in the Fulton School to develop initiatives and research/teaching projects related to the study and public appreciation of marginalized areas/peoples
  • Apply for grants to provide sustainable funds for the initiative

*What are the humanities?

"The term 'humanities' includes, but is not limited to, the study and interpretation of the following: language, both modern and classical; linguistics; literature; history; jurisprudence; philosophy; archaeology; comparative religion; ethics; the history, criticism and theory of the arts; those aspects of social sciences which have humanistic content and employ humanistic methods; and the study and application of the humanities to the human environment with particular attention to reflecting our diverse heritage, traditions, and history and to the relevance of the humanities to the current conditions of national life." --National Foundation on the Arts and the Humanities Act, 1965, as amended http://www.neh.gov/

For more information, please contact graduate assistant Matt Lewis at ml32821@gulls.salisbury.edu

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SIXTH ANNUAL NATIVE AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH-NOVEMBER 2017
A Public Humanities program, sponsored by the Fulton School of Liberal Arts and History Department

LECTURE: “REPRESENTING LGBTQ CHARACTERS IN YOUNG ADULT LITERATURE.” with Malinda Lo
THURSDAY NOV 2, 7:00 PM
CONWAY HALL, ROOM 153

Malinda Lo is the author of several young adult novels. Her novel Ash, a lesbian retelling of Cinderella, was a finalist for the William C. Morris YA Debut Award, the Andre Norton Award for YA Science Fiction and Fantasy, the Mythopoeic Fantasy Award, and was a Kirkus Best Book for Children and Teens. She provides an overview of the history of LGBTQ representation in YA literature and her own research on the subject.  *Co-sponsored with the Honors College.

ISLAMIC CALLIGRAPHY,
THURSDAY NOVEMBER 2, LECTURE & DEMO: 5:45-7:00 PM WORKSHOP: 7:15-8:00 PM
FULTON HALL 111
*Reserved for 10 working spots, please contact Dr. Emin Lelic to RSVP (Please RSVP by 11/1/2017)

Join Khalid Casado, visiting artist from Madrid, Spain, as he introduces the art of Islamic calligraphy to students and curious art lovers alike. Students will become familiar with the traditional materials and learn how to work with a reed pen. He will teach the proportions of the Arabic letters and how to measure them using nukhtas. He will also share stories of his own journey into Arabic calligraphy under the guidance of brilliant master calligraphers in Istanbul where he was classically trained.  An experienced teacher, he has previously taught at the Smithsonian's Arthur M. Sackler Gallery and the George Washington University.  No prior art experience is necessary. Materials will be provided.

Website: sacred-lines.com
Free event open to the public
10 working spots available, additional auditors welcome.  Please RSVP by 11/1/2017 to Dr. Emin Lelic at exlelic@salisbury.edu

“INDIGENOUS RIGHTS & ISSUES IN THE DIGITAL AGE”
FRIDAY NOVEMBER 3RD, 4:00-6:00 PM- Reception to follow
GUERRIERI ACADEMIC COMMONS, ASSEMBLY HALL

SU’s Native American History students present a semester’s worth of civic engagement research projects to the public, focusing on the history and current challenges of six American Indian nations.

LECTURE: “THE MOST AMERICAN GAME OF ALL?  LACROSSE AND ITS NATIVE AMERICAN ROOTS.” with Jim Barnes (SU ‘01)
FRIDAY NOVEMBER 17TH, 6:00-8:00 PM
CONWAY HALL, ROOM 153

SU alumn Jim Barnes, member of the Mohawk tribe and former assistant coach of the U-19 and Men’s Iroquois Nationals teams at the 2003/2006 World Lacrosse Games, introduces the public to the spiritual, cultural, and historical roots and meanings of the game of lacrosse for Indian communities. Reception follows.

KEYNOTE LECTURE: “DOING PUBLIC HISTORY AT THE NATIONAL MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN INDIAN” with Dr. Mark Hirsch (NMAI/Smithsonian Institution)
THURSDAY NOVEMBER 30TH, 6:30-7:30 PM
FULTON HALL, ROOM 111

How does the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C. challenge long-held visitors’ stereotypes about Indian cultures and histories while providing a voice to the hundreds of current Native communities in America? Find out as historian Mark G. Hirsch explores the challenges and rewards of presenting indigenous history to Natives and non-Natives in our Nation’s capital. A reception will follow the lecture.

RELATED EVENT: “A Celebration of Native American Heritage”- Ward Museum of Wildfowl Art, Saturday November 18th, 10:00 a.m-4:00p.m.- crafts, storytelling, and demonstrations.

All events are free and open to the public. For more information, contact Dr. Céline Carayon at cxcarayon@salisbury.edu or visit: http://www.salisbury.edu/history/public-humanities.html

Addressing the Crisis in Black Education
February 23rd, Guerrieri Center, Wicomico Room, 7 p.m.

PANEL DISCUSSION: Anjali Pandey, Noliwe Rooks, Brandi Terrill and Christina Collins consider national obstacles to African American education, broadly defined, and possible solutions to them. Pandey, SU English Department, is an internationally recognized scholar of applied linguistics. Rooks, of Cornell University, is the author of three books and the forthcoming tentatively titled book Cutting School: Apartheid Education and the Big Business of Unmaking Public Education. Terrill, SU Teacher Education Department, is the co-principal investigator for the ENCHANT (Energizing New College Hopefuls through the Arts, Numerical Sciences and Technology) Project. Collins, lead researcher and policy analyst at the United Federation of Teachers, is author of “Ethnically Qualified”: Race, Merit and the Selection of Urban Teachers.

When Communities Come Together: African American Education on the Eastern Shore
Through May 31st, Guerrieri Academic Commons, 1st floor lobby Reception: Thu., March 9, 6-7 p.m. 

NABB CENTER EXHIBIT: Examine the educational challenges and triumphs for African Americans on the Eastern Shore post-Civil War. Focusing on the Princess Anne Academy, Rosenwald Schools, the process of desegregation and Salisbury University, experience the trials and tribulations that students faced for decades. This exhibit celebrates African American History Month as well as Women’s History Month by highlighting some of the educators who strived to improve the quality of education for African American students in their communities.

Women's History Month 

Addressing the Crisis in Black Education Guerrieri Center, Wicomico Room, 7 p.m. PANEL DISCUSSION: Anjali Pandey, Noliwe Rooks, Brandi Terrill and Christina Collins consider national obstacles to African American education, broadly defined, and possible solutions to them. Pandey, SU English Department, is an internationally recognized scholar of applied linguistics. Rooks, of Cornell University, is the author of three books and the forthcoming tentatively titled book Cutting School: Apartheid Education and the Big Business of Unmaking Public Education. Terrill, SU Teacher Education Department, is the co-principal investigator for the ENCHANT (Energizing New College Hopefuls through the Arts, Numerical Sciences and Technology) Project. Collins, lead researcher and policy analyst at the United Federation of Teachers, is author of “Ethnically Qualified”: Race, Merit and the Selection of Urban Teachers.

Salisbury University will be celebrating Women's History Month this March with several special events:

Dolley Film

American Experience: Dolley Madison
March 2nd, Fulton Hall 111, 5 p.m.

FILM & ROUNDTABLE: Dolley Madison was a pivotal player in the early days of the American Republic. She survived two separate wars and maintained friendships with several prominent Americans, including the first 12 Presidents. In her lifetime, she was known as Queen Dolley and established the role of the president’s wife, in American society becoming arguably the first First Lady. The documentary, American Experience: Dolley Madison, follows Dolley’s life from humble Quaker upbringing to her funeral, the largest for a woman that the nation had ever seen. Dr. Dean Kotlowski, a historian of Presidential politics and Dr. Kara French, a U.S. women’s historian, will discuss the progression of women as political actors from the age of Dolley Madison to the present. A reception follows.

Rosenwald Press

Rosenwald: The Remarkable Story of a Jewish Partnership with African American Communities
March 9th, Assembly Hall, Guerrieri Academic Commons, 7-9 p.m., Reception 6 p.m.

FILM & RECEPTION: Julius Rosenwald was a perfect example of the American Dream. The son of an Jewish immigrant, he rose without education or connections to become the President of Sears. Inspired by his faith and the writings of Booker T. Washington, he partnered with African-American communities to build over 5,300 schools in the Jim Crow South. The documentary Rosenwald explores how this Jewish philanthropist became a major player in the Pre-Civil Rights Movement. Despite his generous work to promote civil rights and encourage African-American notables (such as Langston Hughes, Marian Anderson, and W.E.B. DuBois), he is relatively unknown today. A reception will precede the film in the Exhibit Gallery on the first floor of the Academic Commons.

Women’s History Month Keynote Lecture
March 16th, Guerrieri Center, Wicomico Room, 7 p.m.

LECTURE: Premilla Nadasen, Barnard College, discusses the efforts of women, who are doubly marginalized due to their class or employment, to organize to win greater sociopolitical recognition and a voice in the workplace. Her book Welfare Warriors: The Welfare Rights Movement in the United States analyzes how grass-roots welfare activists forged a distinctive brand of feminism out of the political and cultural circumstances of their lives and in the process remapped the contours of radical politics and influenced the contested terrain of welfare policy, and Domestic Workers Unite! discusses the history of domestic worker organizing in the U.S.

Native American Heritage Month 2016

Salisbury University will be celebrating Native American Heritage Month this November with several special events:

Beat of the Drum Film & Roundtable Discussion

Wednesday, November 9 Fulton Hall 111, 6:30 p.m.

To the people of the First Nations, the drum is the heartbeat of the Mother Earth. To beat the drum is to match the heartbeat. The film is a documentary which follows four prominent First Nations performers and their connection through music to the land and their heritage. Their styles range from electronic and rock-and-roll to more traditional music but the one constant is the beat of the drum. After the film, a roundtable panel of experts will discuss the film and answer questions from the audience.

A Convenient Indian: The Social Realities for Today's Indigenous Americans

Keynote Lecture & Reception with Ben Barnes

Thursday, November 17 Holloway Hall, Great Hall, 7 p.m.

The convenient Indian appears in all walks of life. Your local river, county, or even state could utilize an Indian name. However, no one considers the realities of the actual Indian living today. Ben Barnes, Second Chief of the Shawnee, will deliver a lecture addressing the more than four centuries of colonization and oppression as well as the social, legal, and cultural realities for Native communities across the continent.

Off-campus Native American Heritage Month events: The Ward Museum of Wildfowl Art will present "Indigenous Landscapes: The Cultural History of the Chicone Reservation" on November 17th from 4-6 p.m.

Women's History Month 2016

"Working to Form a More Perfect Union": Honoring Women's Activism

Women’s History Exhibition in Blackwell Library March 1-31

Haitian migrant worker, 1980s

SU History M.A. student and FPHP graduate assistant Hallie Kroll has crafted an exhibit which will be on display in Blackwell Library during the month of March. Featuring the archival treasures of our own Nabb Center, this exhibit serves to remind Salisbury University and the Delmarva public at large that working women on the Eastern Shore have a diverse and fascinating history of strength, conviction, and pride. Sponsored by the Fulton Public Humanities Initiative, Blackwell Library and Nabb Research Center.

Photo on right by Phil Decker, Edward H. Nabb Research Center collections.


He Named Me Malala Film & Roundtable Discussion

Monday, March 7 Fulton Hall 111, 7 p.m.

Malala Yousafzai

The youngest Nobel Peace Prize winner is a woman from Pakistan named Malala Yousafzai. When she was 15, the Taliban targeted her for her work in advocating girls’ education, leading to a violent attack on her and her father’s lives. She amazingly survived and became a world leader in global girls’ education. The film is a documentary following the life of Malala and her supportive family as they advocate for education for all. It is followed by a roundtable discussion of the impact of the education of women in a global context. Panelists include SU faculty Aparajita Mukhopadhyay, assistant professor of history, and Manav Ratti, associate professor of English. Sponsored by the Fulton Public Humanities Program.

Triangle Fire Film & Roundtable Discussion

Monday, April 4 Fulton Hall 111, 7 p.m.

Triangle Fire Film

On March 25, 1911, a match fell and caused the deadliest workplace accident in New York City’s history. From PBS’ acclaimed American Experience series, this documentary tells the story of how the Triangle Fire sparked a movement for government regulation on fire safety and workplace quality. 146 people (129 women) died in the fire, trapped in the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory with no way to escape the flames. Most of these workers were immigrant women who toiled for 13 hours a day at 13 cents an hour in search of the American Dream. The deaths of the Triangle Factory workers caused weeks of strikes, leading to 36 new state laws on fire safety and the quality of workplace conditions. The film is followed by a roundtable discussion of women, fashion and labor activism. Panelists include SU faculty Tom Goyens, associate professor of history; Victoria Pass, assistant professor of art; and Leslie Yarmo, assistant professor of theatre.

African-American History Month 2016

Frank X. Walker & Shauna Morgan Poetry Reading

Tuesday, February 9 Guerrieri Center, Wicomico Room, 7 p.m.

Former Kentucky Poet Laureate Walker was voted one of the most creative professors in the South; he is the originator of the word “Affrilachia” and is dedicated to deconstructing and forcing a new definition of what it means to be Appalachian. He is the founding editor of Pluck! The Journal of Affrilachian Arts & Culture and a co-founder of the Affrilachian Poets. In addition, he is the author of eight collections of poetry including Turn Me Loose: The Unghosting of Medgar Evers, winner of the 2014 NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Poetry, and Buffalo Dance: The Journey of York, winner of the Lillian Smith Book Award, as well as two new collections, The Affrilachian Sonnets and About Flight. Emerging poet Morgan, with whom Walker frequently collaborates, springs from a rural district in Clarendon, Jamaica. She is a globalist who researches and teaches literature of the African Diaspora at Howard University in Washington, D.C. The author of two chapbooks, Passages and This Black Love, Morgan’s poems were shortlisted for the 2011 Small Axe literary prize and have appeared in ProudFlesh:New Afrikan Journal of Culture, Politics & Consciousness, Pluck! The Journal of Affrilachian Arts & Culture, The Pierian and the Anthology of Appalachian Writers Volume VI.

(Ad)Dressing History: Pauline Elizabeth Hopkins Keynote Address With April C. Logan

Thursday, February 18 Guerrieri Center, Wicomico Room, 7 p.m.

Pauline Elizabeth Hopkins Society President Logan, assistant professor of English literature at SU, discusses the archive and everyday practices, such as style of dress, as a rich sources of African American memory in her talk. She details the important contributions Hopkins made to African American politics and history through her work as editor of the Colored American Magazine (possibly the first monthly publication in America to target the African American culture), a novelist, playwright and “Boston’s Favorite Colored Soprano.”

Never Caught: The President's Runaway Slave Woman With Erica Armstrong Dunbar

Wednesday, February 24 Perdue Hall, Bennett Family Auditorium, 7 p.m.

Erica Armstrong Dunbar

Dunbar, professor of Black American studies and history at the University of Delaware, discusses her second book, to be published this spring. It traces the life of Ona Judge, one of President George Washington’s slaves, who escaped from the president’s house in Philadelphia to live a free life in New Hampshire. After bargaining for her return to slavery via intermediaries, Washington refused to capture Judge using the rationale of his recently signed Fugitive Slave Act of 1793.

Past Event - Native American Heritage Month 2015

Salisbury University will be celebrating Native American Heritage Month this November with two special events:

The Return of Indian Nations to the Colonial Capital: Heritage Relationships, Indigenous Pilgrimage & the Production of Native Public History with Buck Woodard
Thursday November 12 • Holloway Hall, Great Hall, 6 p.m.

Woodard, a cultural anthropologist who teaches in the Anthropology Program
for the School of World Studies at Virginia Commonwealth University, shares hisDr. Buck Woodard, Guest Speaker on Native Americans experience as director of the American Indian Initiative for the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation in Virginia. Woodard discusses the challenges and thrills of designing a Native historical interpretation program in the colonial capital, his application of cultural anthropology to this public history work and his work with tribal communities.

         

        Contested and Entangled Histories: Taking Action in the New Millennium                          Thursday, November 19 • Holloway Hall, Great Hall, 6 p.m.

SU Native American History course students share the Native Americans in traditional dressresults of their semester-long research projects on tribal histories as sites of contested memory. Through short illustrated presentations, they offer new ways of fostering a better appreciation of Indian history and culture and suggestions for civic action to address current issues and injustices faced by Native communities.

Off-campus Native American Heritage Month events:

Jefferson Patterson Park and Museum, St. Leonard, MD

The Ward Museum of Wildfowl Art, Salisbury University 

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