Skip to Main Content
Salisbury University BW
A Maryland University of National Distinction
navigation icon opens header SALISBURY UNIVERSITY

Richard A. Henson Medical Simulation Center
mobile menu icon

Simulation Suites and Academic Spaces

The Richard A. Henson Medical Simulation Center offers five simulation suites, three fully-equipped control rooms, two debriefing conference rooms, and two academic classrooms. The center also has dedicated space for staff offices, visitors, and storage.  

All of the simulation suites are flexible and fully equipped for audiovisual recording and the classroom and debriefing rooms are fully equipped with presentation and debriefing technology.

Naming Opportunities

Adult Health Simulation Suite

This area is designed to handle a number of various patient scenarios; from the student’s first experience of caring for a sick adult patient on the general wards to handling the intensity of an adult patient in cardiac arrest.

Adult manikin simulators will provide students with the opportunity to practice their skills on simulated patients in the early stages of their illness progressing through to critical illness. The team-based approach to caring for critically ill patients is known to improve patient outcomes, and that will be the hallmark of this room.

In addition to the high-fidelity manikin, this room will provide the opportunity for the students to work with other state-of-the-science equipment such as mechanical ventilators, intensive care monitors, defibrillators, and complex intravenous infusion equipment.

Teaching health care students from various professions how to work together in high-stress environments while caring for various simulated disease states is the goal for this room.

Each simulation scenario will be video-captured for review by students and faculty so that by the time the student enters the actual clinical setting and care for these high-risk patients, the students will have confidence in their knowledge and their ability to care for the patients they see.

Click here to learn more about the high-fideilty manikin housed in this suite. 

- Top -

Labor Delivery Recovery Postpartum Simulation Suite

Labor and delivery are important aspects of health care, but they are highly unpredictable and high risk, even under the best circumstances. The LDRP will provide a realistic setting, equipped with all the supplies and devices normally found in this area. Students will learn obstetrical care with a focus on safety and teamwork in a highly controlled environment.

Clinical scenarios will be conducted using computerized high-fidelity manikins and fetal heart rate simulator equipment to mimic normal labor as well as common complications. Since some obstetrical procedures cannot be easily simulated, role-playing or standardized patients will be also used.

As scenarios unfold, pairs of students will monitor maternal blood pressure, pulse, heart rate and oxygen saturation, evaluate information from fetal monitoring, as well as perform various clinical skills including urinary catheterization, IV insertion, and pain management. Students will learn Leopold’s maneuvers, the phases of labor, how to check for cervix dilation and fetal presentation, and cardinal movements during delivery. A third student will work with the labor coach assisting with breathing and relaxation techniques.

Scenarios will move from uncomplicated vaginal deliveries to complications with mother and baby. Working in interdisciplinary teams, students will practice clinical decision-making as they manage maternal seizures, fetal distress as well as breech deliveries, shoulder dystocia, and postpartum hemorrhage.

With simulated birth, 1-3 students will evaluate a high-fidelity simulated newborn mannequin, provide immediate care or resuscitation as needed. Since the newborn simulator can breathe and change color, students will engage in advanced assessment (blood pressure, heart rate, respiratory rate/depth) and evaluation of electrocardiogram. Students will learn to use specialized equipment associated with this area including an infant warmer, T-piece resuscitator, mechanical ventilator, and infusions via umbilical lines.

Each scenario will be video-captured for review by students and faculty at a later time. Besides critiquing themselves, students receive feedback from faculty and peers, and have the opportunity to repeat simulations to refine their skills.

Click here to learn more about the high-fideilty manikins housed in this suite. 

- Top -

Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Simulation Suite

Designed to replicate a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), this lab will provide the opportunity for student to learn and practice their skills in caring for premature babies and those with serious, life-threatening conditions without posing any danger to real patients and their anxious parents. Live clinical experiences with premature and sick babies are limited for obvious reasons-very sick infants require highly specialized care, available only in Washington, D.C., Baltimore, Philadelphia, and Wilmington, DE. Even at area hospitals, opportunities for experiences with premature infants and medically unstable infants are unpredictable and high stakes.

Learning through simulations is critical in this high-risk specialty. Not only will it assure that all students have a minimum number of simulated experiences to prepare them for the "real world," it will reduce their anxiety when they do care for live patients. In addition, students will have opportunities to use highly specialized medical equipment. Fundamental safety issues will be integrated into every scenario including hand washing, patient identification, and safe medication administration.

A high-fidelity manikin will be used in this area, to simulate a premature baby or a full-term medically unstable baby. Scenarios featuring experiences a premature baby might go through, including placement of a central line, recovering from cardiac surgery, sepsis, and management and prevention of chronic lung disease, will help students learn how to provide safe and effective care. As students make decisions, the high-fidelity baby manikin responds – if the student makes an incorrect choice the baby will start to deteriorate.

Students will have experiences managing such conditions as bronchiolitis, congenital heart abnormalities, sepsis, substance abuse, burns, and traumatic brain injury among others. Simulations are designed to move from relatively simple to very complex as students progress through the semester. In addition, some simulations will require inter-disciplinary collaboration, thus students from nursing and respiratory therapy will work side-by-side to provide patient care.

State-of-the art equipment will be used in this room including equipment for phototherapy and infusion equipment.

Each simulation scenario will be video-captured for review by students and faculty at a later time. Besides critiquing themselves, students receive feedback from faculty and peers, and have the opportunity to repeat simulations to refine their skills.

Click here to learn more about the high-fideilty manikin housed in this suite. 

- Top -

Pediatric Simulation Suite

In this area, students will learn how to care for acute and chronically ill children who range in age from a few days old through adolescence. Live clinical experiences with very sick children is limited on the eastern shore for obvious reasons — very sick children need highly specialized care, available only in Washington, D.C., Baltimore, Philadelphia, and Wilmington, DE. Even at area hospitals, opportunities for experiences with hospitalized children are unpredictable. Nervous parents and anxious students compound this situation.

Learning through simulations is especially important in this high-risk, unpredictable specialty. Not only will it assure that all students have a minimum number of simulated experiences to prepare them for the "real world," it will reduce their anxiety when they do care for live patients. In addition, students will have opportunities to use specialized medical equipment for children and learn to adapt it to a home setting.

This area is designed to replicate several clinical settings: an acute care pediatric hospital room with a child in a crib or youth bed (e.g. pneumonia, diabetes, fractures, post-operative care, gastroenteritis), an emergency department setting with a child on a stretcher needing quick attention (asthma attack, bicycle accident, accidental poisoning), a medical office (routine check-up), or home (cancer care). Simulations are designed to move from relatively simple to very complex as students’ progress through the semester. In addition, some simulations will require inter-disciplinary collaboration, thus students from nursing and respiratory therapy will work side-by-side to provide patient care.

Equipped with a high-fidelity human patient simulator that resembles a 7-8 year old, students will work in groups of 2-3 to refine clinical skills, decision-making, team work, and age-appropriate teaching for the child, parent, and family.

Each simulation will be video-captured for review by students and faculty at a later time. Besides critiquing themselves, students receive feedback from faculty and peers, and have the opportunity to repeat simulations to refine their skills.

Click here to learn more about the high-fideilty manikin housed in this suite. 

- Top -

Psychiatric Mental Health Simulation Suite #1

At the heart of all nursing care is excellent communication. Learning how to interact effectively with people who are stressed due to a change in health status is a critically important skill. In this area of the Simulation Center, students will schedule appointments to meet their standardized patients, trained actors who portray individuals with various emotional conditions from moderate anxiety to post-traumatic stress disorder. Following scripts developed by expert psych/mental health nursing faculty, the actors engage students in 10-30 minute encounters. Each encounter is video-recorded for review by students and faculty at a later time. Students receive feedback from faculty, peers, and standardized patients and have the opportunity to repeat encounters to improve their skills of interpersonal communication.

This area can be “staged” to resemble a counselor’s office or an emergency department psych/mental health intake area allowing students to advance in their skills of human interaction. It can also be easily transformed into a “medical office” setting for future nurse practitioner students to practice interviewing skills, taking a medical history, performing a physical examination, and providing patient and family education.

This area provides opportunities for students to learn how to establish a professional helping relationship, refine their verbal and non-verbal communication skills in one-to-one encounters, and develop strategies for intervening with individuals with common psychiatric disorders including depression, addictions, post-traumatic stress, bi-polar, and severe anxiety.

- Top -

Psychiatric Mental Health Simulation Suite #2

This larger space is designed for group sessions where 1-2 students act as facilitators for a group of 3-4 standardized patients. The physical layout is such that the group can meet while seated on comfortable chairs or around a table.

Following scripts developed by expert psych/mental health nursing faculty, the actors engage students in 20-30 minute group encounters. These encounters are video-recorded for review by students and faculty at a later time. Students receive feedback from faculty, peers, and standardized patients and have the opportunity to repeat encounters to refine their skills of interpersonal communication.

Student learning goals include: facilitating a group session when members have a variety of psych/mental health needs, managing disruptive behavior in a group, organizing a group activity, refining communication skills in more sophisticated encounters, and developing strategies for including all group members.

Additionally, this room can be used as described in psych/mental health room no. 1 for one-to-one student and standardized patient encounters or for nurse practitioner students for interview and treatment involving larger groups, e.g. parent(s) and child(ren).

- Top -

Debriefing Rooms

Despite the glamour associated with high-fidelity human patient simulation, experts agree that debriefing is the single-most important aspect of a simulation experience. Debriefing is a structured learner-centric activity that focuses student thinking on what they did, how they did it, and what they can do better. The purpose of debriefing is to help learners sort out events, understand what happened and why. The focus is on self-discovery for deeper learning. Through a review of the video of the recorded simulation and faculty observations, the debriefing room provides a safe
environment to help students see the strengths and weaknesses of their performance.

Our first debriefing space provides comfortable seating for 8 around a large conference table.  The room is equipped with a computer, wireless overhead projector, and large whiteboard to allow for easy review of simulation recordings, as well as physiologic data from the simulators.  This space resembles an executive conference room. 

Our second debriefing space has seating for approximately 12 people and is equipped with a high-definition monitor, video conferencing capabilities, room-darkening shades, and dimmable lights. 

- Top -

Academic Classrooms

As you can imagine, space for academic instruction is highly desired by many of the simulation center users.  The classrooms in the Simulation Center provide space for faculty to supplement simulation experiences with academic studies through lectures, activities, and class discussions.  These
spaces can also be used for simulation debriefing. 

As a part of our mission, the Simulation Center also supports the medical educational needs of local healthcare providers and community members.  These spaces are often used to provide educational courses, including Basic Life Support, Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support, Pediatric Advanced Life Support, First Aid, Bloodborne Pathogens, and Neonatal Resuscitation. 

The first classroom can seat 12 people and our second classroom seats up to 20 people.  Both of our classrooms are equipped with a computer, wireless overhead projector, large whiteboard and dimmable lights.  In addition, the classroom spaces are also equipped with sophisticated audiovisual equipment for recording purposes. 

- Top -

Simulation Control Rooms

Though small in square footage, these technology-packed rooms are the nerve-center of the Simulation Center. Designed in pairs, each control room has the capability to remotely monitor any of the simulation rooms at any given time. The simulation operator will have the ability to manage the high-fidelity manikins by changing the manikin's physiologic responses (pulse rate, breathing, blood pressure etc.), provide a voice for the manikin, provide the voice on the phone (should students decide to call upon another health professional for advice and/or changes in medical orders), and operate all cameras in any room.

Each room is packed with high-tech equipment from voice-activated headsets, video-capture equipment, remote-controls for camera operations, to several flat panel computer displays as well as a built-in desk and comfortable desk chair on wheels.

- Top -

Need help or have questions about this page? Please visit our Ask a Question or Report a Problem page.
Salisbury University 1101 Camden Avenue Salisbury, MD 21801 410-543-6000

/henson/simcenter/Simulation Suites.html