Fulton School of Liberal Arts

How to Add a Fulton Major or Minor

The Fulton School of Liberal Arts offers the following undergraduate majors:

To declare a major through the Fulton School of Liberal Arts (FSLA), you'll need to:
1. Research your new intended program - for more information on programs, see below.
2. Complete a Change of Major/Minor Form - for some majors, you must declare a track as well.
3. Submit it to the appropriate department contact - see below for department contacts.
4. Check you email regularly for contact from the department.

For the most effective advising, please submit all forms by the start of Program Planning.

Click on the program's link below to learn more about declaring that major.  All courses within the major must be completed with a C grade or better, unless otherwise stated.

The Fulton School of Liberal Arts offers the following minors:

To declare a minor through the Fulton School of Liberal Arts (FSLA), you'll need to:
1. Complete a Change of Major/Minor Form - for some majors, you must declare a track as well.
2. Submit it to the appropriate department contact - see below for department contacts.
3. Once you've declared the minor, view your Academic Requirements Report for requirements.

Please click on the minor's link below to find the appropriate contact.

 

 

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Art (ART):

The Art Department offers a wide-ranging curriculum in fine arts, graphic design and art history, providing students with the technical skill, critical perspective and historical background to pursue careers in art and arts-related fields, as well as graduate study in art.

Only students applying for the B.F.A. degree program must submit a portfolio for review. There is currently no portfolio submission requirement for the B.A. degree.  For more information on submitting the B.F.A. portfolio for review, please click here.

B.A. / B.F.A.

Bachelor of Arts in Art - Students must complete 52 credit hours in art, at least 20 of which must be at the 300/400 level. Of these 52 hours, 36 hours are required core courses, and 16 hours must be taken in one of the following approved tracks: visual communications, two-dimensional studio, three-dimensional studio or art history.

Bachelor of Fine Arts in Art - Students must complete 78 hours in art, at least 16 of which must be at the 300/400 level.  They additionally select an approved track, complete special assignments and periodically submit a portfolio for review.

Selection of a track is necessary upon declaring the major (B.A. or B.F.A):  

B.A. Tracks

  • Art History
  • Three Dimensional Studio
  • Two Dimensional Studio
  • Visual Communications

 

 

B.F.A Tracks

  • Ceramics
  • Drawing
  • Graphic Design
  • Hot Glass
  • Painting
  • Photography
  • Sculpture
  • New Media

During a student's first semester as a declared Art major, they should complete the following two classes required for the major core, if they have not done so already:
-ART 121 Design Principles
-
ART 130 Drawing I

All courses for the Art major must be completed with a grade of C or better.

For questions concerning this degree, please contact the department chair, Mr. William Rogers or visit the department's homepage.

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 Communication Arts (CMAT):

The Department of Communication Arts offers a program leading to the Bachelor of Arts Degree in Communication Arts. The CMAT degree includes tracks of study designed to provide students with a solid liberal arts foundation while preparing them for an eclectic variety of career opportunities.  The department offers a Bachelor of Arts with one of four tracks. 

Selection of a track is necessary upon declaring the major:

  • Human Communication (HCS) - This track allows for emphasis in areas such as interpersonal communication theory, organizational communication, training and development, and human relations/human resources.  Human Communications can prepare a student for careers in human resources, event planning, healthcare, speech writing, and counseling. Students learn oral and written communication skills much desired by employers in a wide variety of business contexts.  HCS Four Year Plan.
     
  • Journalism/Public Relations (JPR) - This track offers students courses focused on writing, reporting, and strategic communication.  Students learn to communicate with audiences on a variety of journalistic print and online platforms, in addition to public relations contexts, including conference management, international public relations, crisis management, nonprofits and corporate communications.  Students also gain practical experience with a University program or community organization.  JPR Four Year Plan.
     
  • Media Production (MPR) - This track meshes the theoretical with the practical, and helps prepare students for a wide range of careers in the electronic media industry or for graduate study.  Students hone their storytelling skills in classes covering audio production, television studio production, filmmaking, documentary and news production, and graphic animation.  MPR Four Year Plan.
     
  • Media Studies (MST) - This track prepares students for careers in mass media management, media criticism and legal aspects in media.  Courses focus on media management, analysis and creative writing.  Students will learn to identify and interpret strategies used by networks and media outlets, and write for television, the radio and the Internet.  Students will also gain an understanding of the legal and industrial backdrop of the business.  MST Four Year Plan.

In addition to declaring a track, students must eventually declare and complete a minor (other than CMAT) to earn a degree.

As prerequisites for other required courses, during a student's first semester as a declared Communication Arts major they should complete two of the three classes required for the major core: 
-CMAT 101 Introduction to Human Communication Studies
-
CMAT 102 Introduction to Mass Media

For questions concerning this degree, please contact the department chair, Dr. Bryan Horikami or visit the department's homepage

Change of Major forms should be delivered the Communication Arts office, FH 261 to Ms. Jacqueline Wellfonder.  Click on the link below to access and complete the necessary form:

Change of Major Form - Communication Arts requires a track to declare the major - submit to Ms. Wellfonder in FH 261.

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Conflict Analysis and Dispute Resolution (CADR):

The curriculum requirements for the CADR major are designed to provide a sound pre-professional training ground for undergraduate students who intend to pursue professional conflict intervention positions or to continue in a higher education setting. The major is designed to provide specialized pre-professional training with its emphasis on analytical and practical skills. While remaining anchored in a liberal arts tradition and strongly rooted in the social sciences, the program is designed to easily allow students to study in other fields outside the major in order to enrich these skills and these traditions. The faculty works with students individually to develop strong analytical and practical skills. Students are also guided in the development of a work ethic appropriate to professional conflict resolution practitioners.

The CADR degree includes tracks of study designed to provide students with a solid liberal arts foundation while preparing them for a variety of career opportunities or for further education.  The department offers a Bachelor of Arts with one of three tracks.  

Selection of a track is necessary upon declaring the major: 

  • International - Emphasizes challenge between nation, state and world systems.

  • Intergroup/Organizational - Emphasizes conflict escalation based on group affiliation including areas such as cross-cultural, ethic, racial and gender conflict.

  • Interpersonal - Emphasizes conflict that may result from human factors such as miscommunication, misperception, misunderstanding and other forces that are manifest between individuals.

During a student's first semester as a declared CADR major, they should complete the following course required for the major core, if they have not done so already:
-CADR 200 Foundations of Conflict & Conflict Resolution

For more information on Conflict Analysis and Dispute Resolution, please visit the CADR Website.

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English (ENGL):

Students may complete the liberal arts English major in one of seven (7) ways:

1.       Creative Writing concentration
2.       English as a Second Language track
3.       Film concentration
4.       Linguistics concentration
5.      Literature concentration
6.      Writing and Rhetoric track
7.      Teacher certification

 Students in all concentrations/tracks must meet the following core requirements:

1.      
Complete ten (10) courses of English beyond ENGL 103.
2.       Complete all courses in the major with grades of C or better.
3.       Complete one (1) writing course beyond ENGL 103 (taken as part of track/concentration).
4.       Complete one (1) diversity course (taken as part of track/concentration).
5.       Complete the requirements of a track or concentration.
6.       Take a minimum of two (2) courses at the 200 level; a minimum of three (3) courses at the 
       400 level.

PLEASE NOTE: All University students must earn a C or better in ENGL103 to apply it toward graduation and to qualify for enrollment in other English courses.

For more information about the English major, please visit the English Department Website.

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Environmental Studies (ENVS):

Environmental Studies is an interdisciplinary major housed in the Fulton School of Liberal Arts. The major focuses on how the environment is defined and understood from the perspectives of the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences.

All Environmental Studies majors must complete a minor in an area other than Environmental Studies. Courses taken to satisfy requirements for the major and the students chosen minor must be completed with a grade of C or better.

PLEASE NOTE: This is not an environmental science program.

For more information on Environmental Studies, please visit the Environmental Studies Website.

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French (FREN):

French is a major within the Modern Languages department where students will gain a strong foundation in French language, culture, and literature. Courses within the French major are to provide students with a greater understanding of the French-speaking world beyond France’s borders.

Students must earn academic credit via a department-approved study abroad program. Questions regarding the fulfillment of this requirement should be directed to your advisor or the department chair.

The French major may be combined with study in other areas such as education or business to enhance career opportunities. The department will advise students in planning an academic program to meet individual interests and career objectives.

For more information on the French major, please visit the French Program Highlights Webpage.

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History (HIST):

The History major encompasses all ages and cultures. Students are encouraged to think in a global context and to actively learn through research.

In addition to the core courses required, students must complete one (1) non-U.S./non-European history course, as well as four other history courses (three of which must be at the 300/400 level).

Students must also register three (3) satisfactory research papers completed in 300/400 level history courses with the History Department.

For more information on the History major, please visit the History Department website. 

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Interdisciplinary Studies (IDIS):

The Fulton School of Liberal Arts offers a major in Interdisciplinary Studies leading to a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science.  Students may choose to complete the Interdisciplinary Studies major via a personally-tailored Individually Designed Track or though one of three other more program-specific tracks.  Most importantly, the IDIS major gives students the opportunity to integrate information across disciplines to help gain a more complete understanding of the chosen area(s) of study.

Selection of a track is necessary upon declaring the major:

  • Indvidually Designed - Declaring this track requires a proposal to be submitted to the Individually Designed Track coordinator.  The coordinator may approve your proposal via email or may wish to meet with you directly. After your IDIS proposal is approved, the coordinator will complete the Change of Major Form and assign you a new academic advisor.  For complete instructions on completing and submitting a proposal, click here.

  • Anthropology - Anthropology provides an interdisciplinary foundation for graduate work in the social sciences and a useful background for anyone who will find themselves working with people of other cultures, either here or abroad, whether in business, medicine, teaching, or advocacy groups.  For more information on the Anthropology Track, click here.

  • Business Administration - Students majoring in interdisciplinary studies may choose a program which combines business administration courses with up to two other areas of study. The track offers students an opportunity to combine their passion in the arts or sciences with a generalist business background. Students interested in the interdisciplinary studies business administration track should consult with the Individually Designed Track coordinator. For complete instructions on completing and submitting a proposal, click here.

  • Ethnic and Intercultural Studies - The Ethnic and Intercultural Studies Track is intended for any student interested in ethnic studies, area studies or comparative studies. The track options offer a variety of courses in three substantive areas: United States Minorities Option consists of courses that emphasize ethnic an minority relations in the United States only. The Cultural Area Studies Option contains courses that focus on a limited geographic area and its culture. The Intercultural and Comparative Culture Studies Option contains courses that are expressly either comparative and/or global in scope.  To view the possible course list of each option within the track, please view the Academic Checklist by clicking here.

    Students interested in the Ethnic and Intercultural Studies Track should consult with the coordinator of ethnic and intercultural studies, Dr. Timothy Dunn.

  • Gender Studies - This track investigates how gender identities have developed over time and how women’s and men’s roles have been produced and shaped by social institutions, such as politics, religion, family, sexuality, media and arts. It will examine how our present day notions of femininity, masculinity, womanhood and manhood have developed and changed and how gender shapes past and present day social roles, behavior and culture.  To view the course options for gender studies, please view the Academic Checklist by clicking here.

    Students interested in this track should consult with the Interdisciplinary Studies coordinator, Dr. Kara French.

Please visit the Interdisciplinary Studies website for full details on the program, and how to change to IDIS.  Click here to access the IDIS site.

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International Studies (INTL):

The International Studies Major is an interdisciplinary program designed for students who wish to develop a broad course of study focusing on the contemporary world that is unconstrained by the boundaries of traditional academic departments. The program encourages students to view the world from a multitude of perspectives and to be broadly concerned with social, political, economic, historical and cultural processes, power relations, and linkages that connect individuals, communities, states and regions.

Students must take a minimum of three (3) credits of foreign academic experience and spend a minimum of three (3) weeks abroad, as approved by the international studies advisor.

Students must also demonstrate mid-level proficiency in a foreign language by either completing a 202-level language course with a grade of C or better, or by scoring 202-level on a placement test.

In addition to core requirements, students must take eight (8) courses within a concentration, with at least five (5) courses being at the 300/400 level. Available concentrations are international relations, global cultural studies, and international political economy.

For more information on the International Studies major, please visit the International Studies Program website.

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Music (MUSC):

The Music major is designed for students who wish to combine the study of music with other interests in a vibrant liberal arts environment.

 There is a diverse array of tracks that students may pursue, including:

  • Teacher Certification
    Students completing the major in the Teacher Certification Track must complete all music and education courses with grades of C or better and maintain a grade point average of 2.75 in order to remain in good standing with the program.

  • Vocal Performance
    Students choosing the Vocal Performance Track must complete one (1) foreign language course for General Education Group IIA or IIC requirements with a grade of C or better.

  • Instrumental Performance

  • Music Technology
    Students pursuing the Music Technology Track must complete specific required courses outside the Music program. Please see the Music Technology Track academic checklist for further information.

  • Traditional/General Music Curriculum

PLEASE NOTE: All students who wish to be admitted to the Bachelor of Arts in music program must successfully pass a music audition and take a theory advisory test.

For more information about the Music major, please visit the Music Department Website.

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Philosophy (PHIL):

The Philosophy major is devoted to addressing questions about values and the meaning of human experiences. Students are invited to talk and write about their lives and about the moral, religious, and political questions that perplex them.

Students must complete an introductory-level course, a proseminar, and core courses in the following areas: value theory, metaphysics/epistemology, western philosophy, and diversity.

In addition, students must complete a Senior Seminar course where they deal creatively with a philosophical issue.

For more information on the Philosophy major, please visit the Philosophy Department website.

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Political Science (POSC):

The Political Science major prepares students for law school and graduate programs in political science, public administration and policy sciences. Careers for political science majors include government service (local, state or federal level), journalism, political campaign management, lobbying, law, law enforcement and the military. Students will complete coursework in each of the following fields: Comparative Politics, International Politics/Foreign Policy, Political Theory, and American Politics/Public Policy.

The Political Science major requires a minimum of ten (10) courses, with at least six (6) courses completed at the 300/400 level. Students must also satisfy the requirements for either the traditional major or the Applied Politics Track.

For more information on the Political Science major, please visit the Political Science Department website.

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Psychology (PSYC):

The Psychology major provides the knowledge and skills necessary to pursue study in psychology beyond the B.A. or to obtain employment in government, education or various human services fields.

In addition to core requirements for the Psychology major, students must also complete coursework in the following categories: Brain Sciences, Developmental, Social, and Clinical.

For more information on the Psychology major, please visit the Psychology Department website.

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Sociology (SOCI):

The Sociology major will study human society and human social interaction. Students will explore a wide range of issues and topics relevant to our lives—health care, environment, social inequality, social justice, race relations, globalization, etc.

In addition to core requirements, students must also complete a one (1) course diversity requirement that cannot be included as part of their sociology elective requirements.

Students must also complete a Senior Experience course that will be related to a topical area of student interest.

For more information on the Sociology major, please visit the Sociology Department website.

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Spanish (SPAN):

A major in Spanish consists of ten (10) courses in the language above the intermediate level (201).

Students must earn academic credit via a department-approved study abroad program. Questions regarding the fulfillment of this requirement should be directed to your advisor or the department chair.

The Spanish major may be combined with study in other areas such as education or business to enhance career opportunities. The department will advise students in planning an academic program to meet individual interests and career objectives.

For more information on the Spanish major, please visit the Spanish Program Highlights Webpage.

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Theatre (THEA):

The Theatre major is to provide focused, pre-professional training within the context of broad liberal arts study that leads to a Bachelor of Arts in theatre. Through applied studio courses, laboratory experiences and full productions, students learn an immediately useful set of theatre skills to prepare them for entry-level professional theatre training programs or graduate school.

 Auditions are not required for admittance into the Theatre Program.

 Eight (8) core courses are required and five (5) courses must be taken in a declared track. Students may choose from the Design and Production Track or the Performance Track.

 For more information about the Theatre major, please visit the Theatre Program website.

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