Interviewing Types

1. The Traditional Interview
This is the scenario you'll face most often: You sit down with a solo interviewer and answer a series of questions designed to help her figure out if you're a great candidate for the job.

2. The Phone Interview
Asked for a phone interview? A call is typically a first-round screening to see if you're a fit to come in for a full interview, so nailing it is key. You'll want to prepare just as you would for an in-person interview, with some key adjustments for the phone format.

3. The Skype Interview
Skype video interviews take the phone-screening interview to the next level, and they're becoming a regular part of the job application process for many companies. From choosing the right on-screen look to making sure all of your tech systems are a go, you'll want to be 100% ready for your TV debut.

4. The Case Interview
The case interview is a more specialized format in which you're given a business problem (“How can BigCoal Co. double its growth?”) or a puzzle (“How many tennis balls fit in a 747?”) to solve. While case interviews were once exclusively the domain of aspiring consultants, they’re now popping up everywhere from tech companies to NGOs.

5. The Puzzle Interview
Google and other highly competitive companies have been known to ask "puzzle" questions, like, “How many people are using Facebook in San Francisco at 2:30 PM on a Friday?” Seems random, but your interview wants to determine how quickly you can think on your feet, how you’ll approach a difficult situation, and how you can make progress in the face of a challenge.

6. The Lunch Interview
Has your potential employer suggested an interview over a meal? That's a good sign—it usually means she wants to learn a little more about you and how you act outside of the office. We'll show how to highlight your strengths and accomplishments while trying to maneuver a mouthful of chicken Piccata.

7. The Group Interview
Group interviews aren't common, but you might find them for sales roles, internships, or other positions in which the company is hiring multiple people for the same job. How do you catch the hiring manager's eye when you're part of the group? It takes a little gusto and a few smart tactics.

8. The Apprentice Interview
In some industries—writing, engineering, or even sales—you may be asked to complete an actual job task as part of the interview. Basically, your interviewers don't want you to tell them you can do the job, they want to see it. Don't panic: If you go in prepared, this is your chance to shine.

9. The Firing Squad
If you'll be reporting to several people or working with a team, it's not uncommon to meet with multiple interviewers—all at the same time. Sounds nice, because you only have to answer those tough questions once, but it can also be tricky to make a strong connection with each decision maker.

10. The Career Fair Interview
If you're attending career fairs as part of your job hunt, get ready for impromptu interviews, where you'll only have 10 or 15 minutes to sell yourself to the recruiter for a chance to come in for a full interview.