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What Can You do With a Graduate Degree in Art/Fine Art?

Please click here to see if SU has this Masters degree

 

Job Titles | Places of Employment | Related Links

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Job Titles:

Click here to find out more about the job titles below (Occupational Outlook Handbook)

MA vs. MFA

The main difference between the Master of Fine Arts (MFA) degree and the Master of Arts (MA) degree is the percentages of liberal arts courses and fine arts courses you will take.

Master of Fine Arts (MFA)

Individuals wishing to receive advanced training prior to becoming a practicing musician, dancer, artist or writer often choose an MFA program. With a more intense focus on art courses (65-85%) and less focus on liberal arts courses (15-35%), the MFA provides more hands-on experience for aspiring artists. The MFA is a 2-year or 60-credit program.

Master of Arts (MA)

The MA focuses approximately 50% of the course work on liberal arts and 50% on visual arts. An MA may be completed in as little as 1 year or 30 credits.

  • Junior Designers
  • Middleweight Designers
  • Senior Designers
  • Art Directors
  • Creative Directors
  • Web Designers
  • Administrative Assistant
  • Animator
  • Art Director
  • Editorial Assistant
  • Executive Assistant
  • Graphic Artist
  • Web Designer
  • Marketing Assistant
  • Multimedia Artist
  • Multimedia Designer
  • Photographer
  • Graphic designer
  • Sketch artist
  • Cartoonists
  • Art appraiser
  • Medical Illustrator
  • Picture Framer

A degree in fine arts opens up three basic lines of work,

--- doing art for artīs sake: the life, the romance, the misery of being always on the brink of bankruptcy, the occasional success, the even rarest: the artists that actually become self sufficient and well known enough for art galleries to put up their work. I know, I have been there.

--- teaching, if you can get one of those prized jobs at a university or college, your are pretty much fixed. Hourly teaching is no fun and there is little money. But a hire from a reputable university could have you sitting pretty. It is possible also to find teaching art at high schools and so on. Yet, for one single opening at a local high school, there were more than 500 applicants. A masters level degree should increase your chances of being hired   --- doing graphic arts: if you take the time, and the three or four years additional time to get yourself quite proficient in Illustrator, Photoshop, Paint, and other Macromedia and or Adobe suites, graphic arts can actually be a great line of work, should you be able to find a job. It is doable though. (There are other venues for you: you can go the crafty way, and one that is much appreciated in some ethnic groups is decorating automobiles).

  • Art Teacher
  • Billboard artist
  • Art Therapist
  • Exhibit designer
  • Mural artist
  • Conservator/ Restorer
  • Auctioneer
  • Community arts center director
  • CD-cover designer
  • Visual Merchandiser
  • Art librarian

Places of Employment:

  • Community Colleges/Universities
  • Advertising Agencies
  • Art Museums
  • Private Studios
  • Advertising agencies
  • Art galleries
  • Colleges/ Universities
  • Museums
  • Camps/ Zoos
  • Auction Houses
  • Greeting card companies
  • Publications Companies
  • Design Facilities
  • Web Design Firms
  • Federal/State Government
  • Printing firms
  • Public Relations firms
  • Libraries
  • Textile Industry
  • Magazines and newspapers
  • Media production companies
  • Restoration firms

Related Links:

Art/Art History

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