Graduate Program in History

 

Holloway Hall
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Course Descriptions

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HIST 500 HISTORY OF MARYLAND [+]
Study of Maryland history and government from the colonial period to present. Places special stress on the leaders, institutions and contributions made in Maryland and by Maryland to the nation. May be offered for undergraduate or graduate credit. Three hours per week.
HIST 511 THE UNITED STATES IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY I [+]
Progressivism to 1945. Study of the major political, economic, intellectual and social forces that shaped America during the first part of the 20th century, including the progressive movement, World War I, Roaring Twenties, Great Depression and World War II. Three hours per week.
HIST 513 THE UNITED STATES IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY II [+]
U.S. history from 1945 to 2000. Study of the major diplomatic, economic, intellectual and social forces that shaped America in the years following World War II, including the Cold War, Civil Rights Movement, tumultuous 1960s, and trends in the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s. May be offered for undergraduate or graduate credit. Prerequisites: HIST 201, 202. Three hours per week.
HIST 514 THE WESTWARD MOVEMENT [+]
Study of the westward movement from the Atlantic to the Trans-Allegheny and Trans-Mississippi West, with emphasis upon the influence of the frontiers in shaping American civilization. May be offered for undergraduate or graduate credit. Three hours per week. Meets General Education IIB.
HIST 515 HISTORY AND FILM [+]
Examines the impact of film on the study and understanding of history. Includes a study of how film has been used to portray 20th century events, how it has captured major events on film and how its power can be used to manipulate public opinion. Documentaries, narrative films and scholarly works will be used as resources. May be offered for undergraduate or graduate credit. Prerequisite: HIST 101, 102. Three hours per week. Meets General Education requirement IIB.
HIST 516 HISTORY OF THE SOUTH [+]
History of the South from the colonial period to the present, covering developments in politics, economics, culture and society. May be offered for undergraduate or graduate credit. Three hours per week.
HIST 517 HISTORY OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY [+]
Survey of evolution of scientific achievements and technology in the Western world, with particular emphasis on the cultural, economic and social implications of these developments. May be offered for undergraduate or graduate credit. Prerequisites: HIST 101, 102. Three hours per week. Meets General Education IIB.
HIST 518 SOCIAL AND CULTURAL HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES I [+]
Studies of American thought as reflected by the people and leaders. Development of American heritage from the colonial period to the present, emphasizing the intellectual, social, religious and economic movements. The first course covers from the colonial period to reconstruction and the second course from about 1876 to present. May be offered for undergraduate or graduate credit. Three hours per week. Meets General Education IIB.
HIST 519 SOCIAL AND CULTURAL HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES II [+]
Studies of American thought as reflected by the people and leaders. Development of American heritage from the colonial period to the present, emphasizing the intellectual, social, religious and economic movements. The first course covers from the colonial period to reconstruction and the second course from about 1876 to present. May be offered for undergraduate or graduate credit. Three hours per week. Meets General Education IIB.
HIST 521 EUROPE IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY WORLD [+]
Study of the economic, social, intellectual and political development of Europe, viewed in the context of world wars, depression and conflicting political ideologies, showing the decline of European dominance and the rise of America and Asia. May be offered for undergraduate or graduate credit. Prerequisites: HIST 101, 102. Three hours per week. Meets General Education IIB.
HIST 522 THE IMMIGRANT IN AMERICAN HISTORY [+]
Explore the history of immigration and ethnicity during the 19th and 20th centuries with an emphasis on socio-cultural dimensions of the immigrant experience, and on historical debates on citizenship, national identity, legislation, work and family life, and ethnic identity.
HIST 523 IMPERIAL RUSSIA [+]
Study of the Russia empire from Peter the Great to the 1917 revolution focusing on the political, economic and social developments, Russia's expansion and the conditions that led to revolution. May be offered for undergraduate or graduate credit. Prerequisites: HIST 101, 102. Three hours per week. Meets General Education IIB.
HIST 524 MODERN RUSSIA [+]
Survey of the 20th century Russia and the Soviet Union, emphasizing the growth to global power, continuity and change, and the inherent problems that led to Soviet collapse and the rise of a new Russia. May be offered for undergraduate or graduate credit. Prerequisites: HIST 101, 102. Three hours per week. Meets General Education IIB.
HIST 525 HISTORY OF U.S. FOREIGN RELATIONS [+]
Historical study of U.S. foreign relations from independence to the present, focusing on the global impact of the nation as an economic, cultural, political and military superpower. May be offered for undergraduate or graduate credit. Prerequisites: HIST 201, 202. Three hours per week.
HIST 533 HISTORY OF TUDOR-STUART BRITAIN [+]
History of Tudor and Stuart Britain, 1485-1707. Surveys the dramatic period of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries in England and the turning point between the medieval and the modern world. Looks at the Reformation, the rise of Parliament, the English Civil Wars, the emergence of Great Britain, and the English Renaissance. Three hours per week.
HIST 536 WORKERS AND WORK IN MODERN AMERICA [+]
Explores the history of the American worker in 19th and 20th centuries with an emphasis on the changing nature of work itself; the labor movement; working-class protest and identity; issues of class, gender and race; and a consideration of current debates on unions, meaningful work and deindustrialization. Three hours per week.
HIST 538 AMERICA IN THE GREAT DEPRESSION [+]
The songs Brother, Can You Spare a Dime and Happy Days Are Here Again caught the despair and hope of Americans during the 1930's. This course considers American society, politics and culture during the 1930's. The first half explores the Crash of 1929,social impact of the Depression, and the effectiveness of the Hoover and Roosevelt administrations in handling the national emergency. The second half explores aspects of the New Deal era: the experiences of minorities, women and workers, the arts and popular culture. Three hours per week.
HIST 540 MINORITY GROUPS IN UNITED STATES HISTORY [+]
Attention to the role and contribution of minority groups in general, with special emphasis on some of the larger and older minority groups. May be offered for undergraduate or graduate credit. Three hours per week. Meets General Education IIB.
HIST 544 AFRICAN-AMERICAN HISTORY TO 1865 [+]
Explores African-American history from the colonial period to 1865. Focuses on the beginnings of enslavement, the development of the slavery institution and the role of African-Americans in the Civil War. May be offered for undergraduate or graduate credit. Three hours per week. Meets General Education IIB.
HIST 545 AFRICAN-AMERICAN HISTORY FROM 1865 [+]
Explores African-American history from 1865 to present. Focuses on the struggle for acceptance, patterns of discrimination and current challenges. May be offered for undergraduate or graduate credit. Three hours per week. Meets General Education IIB.
HIST 551 WORLD WAR I [+]
Study of the events that occurred during World War I, from the assassination of Franz Ferdinand at Sarajevo to the peace of 1919. Emphasis on political developments, social and intellectual implications of the war, and its significance in shaping the 20th century. Cannot receive credit for both HIST 381 and HIST 451. May be offered for undergraduate or graduate credit. Prerequisite: HIST 102. Three hours per week. Meets General Education IIB.
HIST 552 THE SECOND WORLD WAR: A GLOBAL HISTORY [+]
The Second World War has shaped the contemporary world as no other 20th century event has. Through discussion and study of texts and film, this course examines the global political, military and economic aspects of the conflict as well as its social and cultural impact. May be offered for undergraduate or graduate credit. Prerequisite: HIST 101 and 102. Three hours per week. Meets General Education requirement IIB.
HIST 553 THE COLD WAR: A GLOBAL HIST [+]
After 1945 the fierce rivalry between the United States and the Soviet Union threatened the world with nuclear destruction and dominated global politics for almost 50 years. This course examines the political and cultural impact of the Cold War on the United States, Europe and the developing world. May be offered for undergraduate or graduate credit. Prerequisite: HIST 101, 102. Three hours per week. Meets General Education requirement IIB.
HIST 560 HISTORY OF CHINA SINCE 1800 [+]
The revolutionary transformation of China from the 19th century to the present, with emphasis on the impact of imperialism, the profound effects of Western technology and foreign policy wrought by the history of its relations with the West. May be offered for undergraduate or graduate credit. Prerequisites: HIST 101, 102. Three hours per week. Meets General Education IIB.
HIST 570 HISTORY OF THE EARLY ROMAN EMPIRE [+]
Study of particular institutions and movements in Roman history. Emphasis on family history and social and religious trends during the early imperial period of Roman history. May be offered for undergraduate or graduate credit. Prerequisites: HIST 101, 102. Three hours per week. Meets General Education IIB.
HIST 571 BRONZE AGE AEGEAN [+]
Study of the Bronze Age Aegean archaeology of the Minoan, Mycenaean and Trojan civilizations. Prerequisites: HIST 101, 102. Three hours per week. Meets General Education IIB.
HIST 572 STUDIES IN CLASSICAL ARCHAEOLOGY [+]
Assorted topics and archaeological sites of the ancient Mediterranean world (Crete, Greece and Italy). May be taken twice under different subtitles. May be offered for undergraduate or graduate credit. Prerequisites: HIST 101, 102. Three hours per week. Meets General Education IIB.
HIST 573 ROMAN ARCHAEOLOGY [+]
Study of Roman archaeology from the early Iron Age through the Republican and Imperial periods. Prerequisites: HIST 101, 102. May be offered for undergraduate or graduate credit. Three hours per week. Three hours per week. Meets General Education IIB.
HIST 574 HISTORY OF ANCIENT EGYPT [+]
Intensive study of three eras of Egyptian history: the Pyramid Age, the chaotic Middle Kingdom and New Kingdom Absolutism. Emphasis on cultural, religious and artistic contributions. May be offered for undergraduate or graduate credit. Prerequisite: HIST 101. Three hours per week. Meets General Education IIB.
HIST 575 GREEK ARCHAEOLOGY [+]
Study of Greek archaeology from the Protogeometric and Archaic periods through the Classical (Hellenic) and Hellenistic eras. Prerequisites: HIST 101, 102. May be offered for undergraduate or graduate credit. Three hours per week. Meets General Education IIB.
HIST 577 MILITARY HISTORY OF THE MODERN WORLD [+]
Examines the military history of the modern world from 1500 A.D. to the present. The relationship between the military realities of modern societies nad their social structure will be studied as well as the strategy and tactics used by modern armies. Time will also be spent studying the ideas of the period through the lives of some of the modern world's greatest soldiers, statesmen, philosophers and historians. Three hours per week.
HIST 578 ANCIENT MILITARY HISTORY [+]
Explores the history of the great battles and campaigns of antiquity. Emphasis is placed on developments in strategy and tactics, the lives of the men in the ranks, the careers of leaders, and the decisive nature of these conflicts on the course of history. Special attention is given to the interaction between military realities and the functioning of society as a whole. May be offered for undergraduate or graduate credit. Prerequisite: HIST 101. Three hours per week. Meets General Education requirement IIB.
HIST 579 MEDIEVAL MILITARY HISTORY [+]
Explores the military history of the Medieval World from the fall of the Roman Empire in the fourth century A.D. and the subsequent establishment of the Germanic Kingdoms, to the decline of the supremacy of the mounted warrior at the beginning of the sixteenth century. Students will be encouraged to understant the relationship between the military realities of medieval societies and their social structure. The course will also outline the strategy and tactics used by medieval armies, how these affected the lives of the populations, and how new developments in these fields led to the creation of the nation-states in the early modern period. Time will also be spent studying the ideas of the period through the lives of some of the medieval worlds' greatest soldiers, statesmen, philosophers, and historians. Three hours per week.
HIST 580 MUSEUM STUDIES [+]
Work experience course that invites students to learn techniques of museology. Students work in cooperation with various local or regional museums under the supervision and direction of a museum curator. May be taken twice with the consent of the instructor. May be offered for undergraduate or graduate credit. Prerequisite: Written approval of department chair to register. Three hours per week. Meets General Education IIB.
HIST 583 ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY OF DELMARVA [+]
Through class discussions, students will gain an understanding of the natural history of Delmarva and the Chesapeake, changing patterns of land and resource use, environmental conflicts, the growth of twentieth-century conservation efforts, and finally, the implications of burgeoning growth in the eastern metropolitan corridor on Delmarva. This course will draw upon the resources of the Salisbury area through local speakers, environmental activists, foresters, authors and farmers. Local sites, including the Ward Museum of Wildfowl Art, the Nanticoke Indian Museum, Pemberton Park, Crisfield and Smith Island will be utilized. Research paper required. Three hours per week.
HIST 590 STUDIES IN HISTORY [+]
Intensive historical study of particular periods and groups, economic, intellectual, cultural, social movements and/or institutions. May be taken twice under different course titles recorded with the registrar. May be offered for undergraduate or graduate credit. Prerequisite: Consent of department chair. Three hours per week. Meets General Education IIB.
HIST 601 METHODS OF HISTORICAL RESEARCH [+]
Students will examine first-hand, the vast original documentation relating to the lower Delmarva peninsula at the Nabb Research Center, and what social, political, educational, economic, religious, or cultural material(s) might be included in each record type. Familiarity with 17th and 18th century language and handwriting (similar to learning a foreign language) must also be included in order to understand the documents. Research and interpretation will focus on creating a more complete picture of what life was like during the century after the initial settlement of the Lower eastern Shore. May be taken only once. Three hours per week.
HIST 602 SEMINAR: COLONIAL AND REVOLUTIONARY AMERICA [+]
A study of Colonial institutions and the American Revolutionary movement. Emphasis is placed upon the study of specific topics through individual research projects. May be taken twice under different course subtitles recorded with the registrar. Three hours per week.
HIST 603 SEMINAR IN NINETEENTH CENTURY AMERICA [+]
An opportunity to explore in-depth 19th century American society, via themes selected by the instructor. May be taken twice under different course subtitles recorded with the registrar. Three hours per week.
HIST 604 SEMINAR IN EUROPEAN HISTORY [+]
Designed to enable the student to explore, through intensive research, basic problems in European history. The period or topics to be studied will be selected by the instructor. May be taken twice under different course subtitles recorded with the registrar. Three hours per week.
HIST 605 SEMINAR: MARYLAND HISTORY [+]
Designed to acquaint students, through readings and research, with some of the major problems and developments in the history of Maryland. May be taken twice under different course subtitles recorded with the registrar. Three hours per week.
HIST 606 SEMINAR IN TWENTIETH CENTURY AMERICA [+]
Enables intensive exploration of specific periods and/or problems in this century through individual research. May be taken twice under different course subtitles recorded with the registrar. Three hours per week.
HIST 607 SEMINAR IN CHESAPEAKE AND MIDDLE ATLANTIC HISTORY [+]
Intensive seminar exploring comparative facets of Chesapeake history (economic, social, cultural, religious, and political) in Maryland, Virginia, Delaware, New Jersey, Pennsylvania and New York. The impact of the Chesapeake area (and Delmarva) within the broader context of the Middle Atlantic community will be understood. May be taken twice under different subtitles. Three hours per week.
HIST 608 SEMINAR IN AMERICAN DIPLOMACY [+]
Permits investigation, through reading and research, of selected problems in the history of American diplomacy. May be taken twice under different course subtitles recorded with the registrar. Three hours per week.
HIST 609 STUDIES IN EARLY DELMARVA [+]
Intensive seminar which explores life on early colonial Delmarva through examination of primary records of the Lower Eastern Shore including settlers, settlement patterns, and social and familial networks. In-depth analysis will result in the reconstruction of this Eastern Shore social and economic world. May be taken twice under different subtitles. Three hours per week.
HIST 610 SEMINAR IN LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY [+]
An intensive study of major institutions and specific periods in Latin America through reading and research. May be taken twice under different course subtitles recorded with the registrar. Three hours per week.
HIST 612 SPECIAL TOPICS SEMINAR [+]
An intensive readings or research course on a special topic selected by the instructor. May be taken twice under different subtitles. Three hours per week.
HIST 613 SEMINAR IN ANCIENT HISTORY [+]
Intensive seminar exploring ancient civilizations such as Greece, Rome, Egypt and the Near East as selected by the instructor. May be taken twice under different course subtitles. Three hours per week.
HIST 614 SEMINAR IN ASIAN HISTORY [+]
Intensive seminar exploring in-depth Asian societies via themes selected by the instructor. May be taken twice under different course subtitles. Three hours per week.
HIST 615 SEMINAR IN AFRICAN HISTORY [+]
In-depth study of specific topics in African history as selected by the instructor. May be taken twice under different course subtitles. Three hours per week.
HIST 629 INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH/HISTORIOGRAPHY [+]
Specialized historiography and/or research course for graduate students (either thesis or non-thesis options). May be taken only once. Prerequisite: Consent of the graduate director. Three hours per week.
HIST 630 DIRECTED RESEARCH [+]
Preparation of optional research project in master's degree program under departmental supervision. May be taken only once and only in conjunction with HIST 631, Thesis. Prerequisite: Consent of graduate director. Three hours per week.
HIST 631 THESIS [+]
May be taken only once and man be taken without HIST 630, Directed Research. Prerequisite: Consent of graduate director.