SALISBURY UNIVERSITY


Course Descriptions

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GEOG 100 INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN GEOGRAPHY

Introduction to the variable human character of the earth. Contemporary world problems such as population, growth, economic development, urbanization, resource utilization and human alteration of the natural environment are examined from a locational perspective. Three hours per week. Meets General Education IIIB or IIIC (Prior to Fall 2008: IIB).

GEOG 101 WORLD GEOGRAPHY: EUROPE AND ASIA

A geographic study of the countries of Europe and Asia emphasizing their physical and cultural characteristics. Special attention to contemporary issues/problems. Three hours per week. Meets General Education IIIB or IIIC (Prior to Fall 2008: IIB).

GEOG 102 WORLD GEOGRAPHY: AFRICA AND THE AMERICAS

Geographic study of countries of Africa and the Americas emphasizing their physical and cultural characteristics. Special attention to contemporary issues/problems. May not receive credit for both GEOG 301 and GEOG 102. Three hours per week. Meets General Education IIIB or IIIC (Prior to Fall 2008: IIB).

GEOG 104 EARTH AND SPACE SCIENCE

An introductory course in earth and space science for prospective elementary school teachers. An examination of the physical character of the Earth and its place in the solar system. Students can not receive credit for both GEOG 104 and GEOG 105. Prerequisite: Intended for elementary education majors. Three hours lecture and one two-hour lab per week. Meets General Education IVA or IVB (Prior to Fall 2008: IIIA or IIIB).

GEOG 105 INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY

Introduction to the variable physical character of the earth. Treatment of weather, climate, soil, vegetation, landforms and oceanic circulation with emphasis on processes, interrelationships and distributional patterns. Three hours lecture, one two-hour laboratory per week. Meets General Education IVA or IVB (Prior to Fall 2008: IIIA or IIIB).

GEOG 107 WEATHER AND HUMAN AFFAIRS

Comprehensive introduction to weather and its effects on our everyday lives. Influence of human activity on the atmosphere: acid rain, ozone depletion, global warming, nuclear winter. Three hours per week. Meets General Education IVB (Prior to FaIl 2008: IIB).

GEOG 111 INTRODUCTION TO OCEANS AND COASTS

The study of coastlines, coastal landforms, and the tectonic and oceanographic forces that shape them. One mandatory Saturday half-day field trip to Assateague Island is required. Three hours per week. Meets General Education IVB.

GEOG 141 CURRENT ISSUES IN EARTH SCIENCE

Teaches non-science majors how to critically evaluate contemporary Earth Science topics of public interest as reported in the media. Learn about the science behind issues such as terminology, processes, data analysis and underlying assumptions. Differing viewpoints and ethical considerations are discussed. Two hours lecture, two hours discussion per week. Meets General Education IVB (Prior to Fall 2008: IIIB).

GEOG 150 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE: CONCEPTS AND METHODS

Explores global and regional environmental processes and systems, as well as the impact of humans on these systems. Addresses current environmental issues such as climate change, habitat loss and water pollution, emphasizing the role of science in identifying problems and finding solutions. May not receive credit for both BIOL 150 and GEOG 150. Does not satisfy requirements within the major. Three hours lecture, two hours lab per week. Meets General Education IVA or IVB (Prior to Fall 2008: IIIA or IIIB).

GEOG 201 WEATHER AND CLIMATE

Examination of weather and climate with emphasis on processes and distributional patterns. Interrelationships between climatic controls stressed. Three hours lecture, one two-hour laboratory per week. Meets General Education IVA or IVB (Prior to Fall 2008: IIIA or IIIB).

GEOG 202 CULTURAL GEOGRAPHY

Examination of some of the basic concepts of human geography. Emphasis on such subjects as cultural origins and diffusion, perception, settlement forms and the relationship between humans, their culture and the physical environment. Three hours per week. Meets General Education IIIB or IIIC (Prior to Fall 2008: IIB).

GEOG 203 ECONOMIC GEOGRAPHY

Analysis of the locational factors explaining the geographic distribution of economic activity: rural and urban land use, cities, industry, transport and trade, economic development. Three hours per week. Meets General Education IIIB or IIIC (Prior to Fall 2008: IIB).

GEOG 204 STATISTICAL PROBLEM SOLVING IN GEOGRAPHY

Introduction to the basic principles of quantitative analysis in geography. Emphasis on the geographic applications of various techniques rather than on the underlying statistical theory. Prerequisites: Completion of MATH 155 or 213. Three hours lecture plus two hours lab per week.

GEOG 219 MAP INTERPRETATION AND ANALYSIS

Introduction to mapping science principles and practice, focusing on the application of methods to map interpretation. Topics covered include surveying (compass and pace), map projections, fundamentals of GPS, map compilation and design, and an introduction to GIS. Two hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week.

GEOG 220 HUMANS AND THE ENVIRONMENT/HONORS

Interdisciplinary laboratory course in conjunction with the departments of Biology and Chemistry designed for non-science majors to develop awareness of ways earthís environment is influenced by human activities and effects of the environment on human society. Cannot be repeated for credit in the Biology or Chemistry departments; cannot be used to satisfy course requirements within the major. For students in the Honors Program. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week.

GEOG 262 GEOGRAPHY OF SPORT

Training in methods of geographical study and analysis through a range of activities centered around the theme of sport and place. Topics include sport and culture, sport as industry, professional sports location patterns, place identity, market area analysis, sport of urban economic development strategy, politics of stadium location and funding, and (geo)politics of hosting and representation in international sporting events. three hours per week. Meets General Education IIIB or IIIC.

GEOG 301 WORLD REGIONS

Examination of contemporary patterns of life in selected areas of the world from a regional viewpoint. Attention given to the physical environment, resource use, economic activities, demographic and sociocultural characteristics and regional problems. Prerequisite: GEOG 100 or 105 or consent of instructor. Three hours per week. Meets General Education IIIB to IIIC (Prior to Fall 2008: IIB).

GEOG 302 GEOGRAPHY OF THE UNITED STATES AND CANADA

Analysis of contemporary patterns of American and Canadian life from a regional perspective. Major topics include the physical environment, resource and land use, economic activities, demographic and sociocultural characteristics, and regional problems. Prerequisite: GEOG 100 or 105 or consent of instructor. Three hours per week.

GEOG 308 PRINCIPLES OF PLANNING

Analysis of the theory and practice of planning at various spatial levels (local, regional, state and federal). Emphasis on planning processes, responsibilities of professional planners, and detailed examination of contemporary issues like control of sprawl and coastal zone management. Cannot receive credit for both GEOG 208 and GEOG 308. Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent of instructor. Three hours per week.

GEOG 309 GEOGRAPHY OF THE MID-ATLANTIC

Study of the U.S. Mid-Atlantic region encompassing human and physical aspects of its geography, particularly the relationship between humans and their physical environment. Course has two field trips. Prerequisites: One physcal geography/geology course and one human geography course. Three hours per week.

GEOG 310 REGIONAL GEOGRAPHY OF EUROPE

Regional analysis of contemporary geographic patterns of Europe. Emphasis on physical, economic and political patterns and regional problems. Prerequisite: GEOG 100 or 105 or consent of instructor. Three hours per week.

GEOG 311 COASTAL PROCESSES

A detailed study of coastlines, the physical processes that shape them and the scientific methodologies used to measure them. Two mandatory Saturday half-day field trips are required. Prerequisite: GEOG 111, GEOL 211. Two hours lecture, two hours lab per week.

GEOG 312 SEVERE AND HAZARDOUS WEATHER

Examines the physical and societal aspects of severe and hazardous weather in an effort to better knowledge of the atmospheric environment around us. Specific topics include extratropical cyclones, thunderstorms, tornadoes, severe winter weather, hailstorms, lightning, and tropical weather systems. Case studies are used to investigate human, economic, and environmental consequences of sever and hazardous weather events. Prerequisite: GEOG 201. Three hours lecture per week.

GEOG 316 BIOGEOGRAPHY

Study of the spatial distribution of plants and animals, including the processes that led to those distributions. Synthesizes knowledge from the fields of ecology, geology, climatology, paleontolgy, and physical anthropology to understand how the interactions between physical and biological forces shape these distributions. Topics include patterns of biodiversity, evolution and extinction, communities and ecosystems, life on islands, earth history, paleoecology, human impacts, and conservation. Two mandatory field trips to local natural areas. Prerequisites: A combined total of 12 hours in Geography and/or Biology, including at least one introductory physical geography course, or consent of the instructor. Three hours lecture per week.

GEOG 318 LOCAL FIELD COURSE

Familiarizes students with some of the basic field techniques of geography. Land use field studies and mapping of the rural and urban areas of eastern Maryland scheduled for Sundays. Prerequisite: Twelve hours in geography or consent of instructor. Four hours per week including five one-day field trips.

GEOG 319 GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SCIENCE

Study of automated information handling using geographically referenced data to support spatial analysis. Consideration of and experience in the collection, storage and display of computer manipulated data. Includes hands-on experience with a variety of commercial software GIS packages. Prerequisite: GEOG 219. Three hours lecture, one two-hour laboratory per week.

GEOG 320 CARTOGRAPHIC VISUALIZATION

Theory and application of cartographic principles and practices to advanced cartographic design. Lectures emphasize theory and principles. Laboratory provides practical experience in designing maps. Prerequisite: GEOG 219. Two hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week.

GEOG 321 REMOTE SENSING OF THE ENVIRONMENT

Examination of fundamental principles, history and applications of remote sensing technology to environmental studies. Emphasis on electromagnetic spectrum, aerial photography, photogrammetry, satellite imaging systems, digital image processing, and major applications of remote sensing in mapping and managing environmental problems. Prerequisite: Twelve hours in geography. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week.

GEOG 325 CONSERVATION AND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

An integrative look at the co-evolution of resource exploitation, use and conservation, the changing ideology that drives trends in resource management. Special emphasis on scalar dilemmas in resource management, the effective role of our legal infrastructure in resource management, and shifting values regarding the role of human-nature interactions in America. Prerequisites: One physical geography/geology course and one human geography course. Three hours per week.

GEOG 327 POLITICAL GEOGRAPHY

Survey of the sub-discipline of political geography. Emphasis on spatial organization and conflict at various scales; geographies of elections; and analyses of international relations from a geographical perspective, with a consideration of geographic, economic and cultural aspects of global conflicts. Prerequisites: GEOG 100, 101, 102, or 203. Three hours per week.

GEOG 328 APPLIED PLANNING

Application of planning principles and theories to real-world land use issues. Particular attention will be paid to the subdivision plat review process, zoning ordinances, and the role of citizens and local government in planning. Several actual planning case studies will be examined. Prerequisite: GEOG 308. Three hours per week.

GEOG 389 REGIONAL FIELD STUDY OF THE UNITED STATES

On-site study of the geography, history and culture of selected regions of the United States. Pre-tour lectures and other activities required. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisites: 6 hours in GEOG and/or GEOL or permission of instructor. Three hours per week.

GEOG 399 INTERNATIONAL FIELD STUDY

On-site study of the geography, history and culture of selected countries. Pre-tour lectures and other activities required. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

GEOG 401 SOIL, WATER AND ENVIRONMENT

Study of basic chemical and physical properties of soil, focusing on surface hydrology of small watersheds and the related techniques used in environmental planning. Most labs involve fieldwork. Prerequisites: GEOG 201, 219, GEOL 103; or BIOL 310. Two hours lecture, three hours laboratory per week.

GEOG 402 ENVIRONMENTAL PLANNING

Translation of responsible environmental policies and principles into practical land-use regulations and local and regional planning tools. Emphasis on the landscape and land-use dimensions of environmental planning. Prerequisite: GEOG 308 or consent of instructor. Three hours per week including three one-day field trips.

GEOG 402G ENVIRONMENTAL PLANNING

Translation of responsible environmental policies and principles into practical land-use regulations and local and regional planning tools. Emphasis on the landscape and land-use dimensions of environmental planning. Prerequisite: GEOG 308 or consent of instructor. Three hours per week including three one-day field trips.

GEOG 403 ENVIRONMENTAL HAZARDS

Introduces students to the geographic principles and theories of natural and technological hazards. Both the physical properties of hazards and the human actions and reactions to hazards will be emphasized. Prerequisite: Six hours of geography or consent of instructor. Three hours per week.

GEOG 404 RURAL GEOGRAPHY AND LAND-USE PLANNING

Analysis of the economic, demographic and spatial patterns of the rural United States. Special attention given to the problems and potentialities of non-metropolitan areas and to land-use planning. May be offered for undergraduate or graduate credit. Prerequisite: GEOG 203. Three hours per week.

GEOG 406 REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

Analysis of the spatial incidence of economic growth. Emphasis on the spatial dimension as an important consideration in theory and practice of economic development. Prerequisite: GEOG 203 or consent of instructor. Three hours per week.

GEOG 408 SEMINAR IN URBAN THEORY

Examination of theories and policies explaining urban development along with methods for evaluation. Assessment of the urban planning process with case studies. Prerequisites: GEOG 100, 101, 102, or permission of instructor. Three hours per week.

GEOG 409 PHYSICAL AND HUMAN DIMENSIONS OF CLIMATIC CHANGE

A revolving set of topics presented by geography faculty or invited speakers related to the scientific or socio-economic effects of climatic change on modern society. Topics will be announced the semester preceding the course offering. Prerequisites: C or better in GEOG 201 and two courses from the following: GEOL 206, GEOL 405, GEOG 402, GEOG 403, GEOG 410, GEOG 413. Two hours seminar and one hour online session per week.

GEOG 410 METEOROLOGY

Analysis of physical processes and dynamics of the atmosphere. Topics include upper atmospheric flow, forecasting and severe weather. May be offered for undergraduate or graduate credit. Prerequisite: GEOG 201 or consent of instructor. Three hours per week.

GEOG 411 GEOMORPHOLOGY

Study of the surface of the earth and the geologic processes that modify it. Topics include the weathering and erosion of rocks, the deposition of sediments, the classification of landforms, and the long-term evolution of landscapes. One three-day field trip is optional. Prerequisites: GEOL 103 and junior standing. Three hours lecture, two hours lab per week.

GEOG 412 WEATHER ANALYSIS AND FORECASTING

Introduction to the basic tools of weather analysis and techniques of weather forecasting. Acquire the skills needed to analyze and interpret surface and upper-air observations, data from sagellites and radar, atmospheric soundings, and sever weather indices. Make forecasts of temperature, precipitation, and other meteorological conditions. Prerequisites: GEOG 201 and 410. Three hours lecture per week.

GEOG 413 APPLIED CLIMATOLOGY

Analysis of the impact of climate on the physical environment and human behavior. Topics include climatic change, contemporary climatic problems and the influence of climate on agriculture, and energy use. May be offered for undergraduate or graduate credit. Prerequisite: GEOG 201 or consent of instructor. Three hours per week.

GEOG 414 RESEARCH AND WRITING

Development of research methods in geography. Topics include formulation of problems, establishment of hypotheses, development of structures for testing hypotheses and practice with forms of geographic presentation. Maps, numerical and field methods are used. Cannot receive credit for both GEOG 300 and GEOG 414. Prerequisites: Twelve hours of geography, including completion of GEOG 204 or consent of instructor. Three hours per week.

GEOG 415 SELECTED PROBLEMS

Independent study permitting research or in-depth work on a selected topic to be indicated on studentís transcript. May be taken twice for credit under different subtitles. Intended for seniors with 18 or more hours in geography and/or geology. Prerequisite: Permission of department chair. Three hours per week for each credit hour.

GEOG 416 SMART GROWTH

Explanations of smart growth programs addressing urban challenges such as sprawl, lack of open space, and central city declines. Introductions of early efforts to manage urban growth and growth management programs at the state and local levels. Prerequisites: GEOG 308 or permission of instructor. Three hours per week.

GEOG 417 WATER RESOURCES

An exploration of water resources in America that looks at water in all of its facets as a physical resource, and a nexus of human-environment interactions. This course is designed for multiple disciplines and presumes a variable knowledge base at the beginning. Weaving together the hydrologic flow of water, and the social structures that capture, divert, buy, sell, steal, manipulate and exploit water resources forms the basis of the exploration for this senior seminar. Prerequisites: One course in physical geography and one course in human geography and junior standing. Three hours per week.

GEOG 419 ADVANCED GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SCIENCE

Study of current theories and development trends in GIS technology. Emphasis on hands-on working knowledge utilizing ARC/INFO software. Prerequisite: COSC 120 and GEOG 319 or consent of instructor. Three one-hour lectures, one two-hour laboratory per week.

GEOG 422 READINGS IN GEOGRAPHY

Permits in-depth study of a selected topic to be indicated on studentís transcript. May be taken twice for credit under different subtitles. Intended for seniors with 18 or more hours in geography and/or geology. Prerequisite: Permission of department chair. Three hours per week for each credit hour.

GEOG 435 GIS PROGRAMMING

Theory and application of computer programming solutions in geography. This course focuses on developing custom computer programs addressing classical problems in geography and spatial analysis not ordinarily solved using out-of-the-box GIS software. Students are introduced to basic programming techniques, object model diagrams, component object modeling (COM) and spatial databases. Prerequisites: GEOG 320 and COSC 117, 118, or 120. Three hours per week.

GEOG 450 TOPICS IN GEOGRAPHY

Analysis of a selected systematic/regional topic to be entered on the studentís transcript. May be taken three times for credit under different subtitles. Prerequisite: Permission of the department chair. One to four hours per week.

GEOG 460 INTERNSHIP

Provides students with opportunities to apply geographic/planning theory, techniques and knowledge as practicing professionals. Intended for seniors with 18 or more hours in geography. Cannot be used to satisfy requirements for the major. May be offered for undergraduate or graduate credit. Prerequisite: Approval of the department. Three hours per week for each credit hour. (P/F)

GEOG 475 FIELD PROBLEMS IN GEOGRAPHY

Geographic research field experience. Development of a research proposal, collection and analysis of data and the integration of such in a formal research paper. May be offered for undergraduate or graduate credit. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

GEOG 499 GEOGRAPHY HONORS

Two-semester independent study leading to preparation of an honors thesis and graduation with honors in geography. Students may enroll by invitation of the department only. Specific topic indicated on the studentís transcript.

GEOG 501 SOIL, WATER AND ENVIRONMENT

Study of basic chemical and physical properties of soil, focusing on surface hydrology of small watersheds and the related techniques used in environmental planning. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and GEOL 103 or permission of instructor. Two hours lecture, two hours laboratory or one field trip per week.

GEOG 503 ENVIRONMENTAL HAZARDS

Introduces students to the geographic principles and theories of natural and technological hazards. Both the physical properties of hazards and the human actions and reactions to hazards will be emphasized. Prerequisite: Six hours of geography or consent of instructor. Three hours per week.

GEOG 504 SEMINAR: PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY

Seminar deals with current problems in the areas of meteorology, climatology, soils, geomorphology and vegetation. Topics selected with consent of instructor. May be taken twice for credit under different subtitles. Prerequisite: 400-level physical geography course or consent of instructor. Three hours per week.

GEOG 505 RURAL GEOGRAPHY AND LAND-USE PLANNING

Analysis of the economic, demographic and spatial patterns of the rural United States. Special attention given to the problems and potentialities of non-metropolitan areas and to land-use planning. May be offered for undergraduate or graduate credit. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and GEOG 203 or consent of the instructor. Three hours per week.

GEOG 506 SEMINAR IN REGIONAL GEOGRAPHY

Analysis of selected topics on the physical and/or human geography of specified geographic regions. The region under consideration varies from semester to semester. Topics chosen with consent of instructor. May be taken twice for credit under different subtitles. Prerequisite: 400-level physical geography course or consent of instructor. Three hours per week.

GEOG 508 URBAN PLANNING

Examination of theories and policies related to urban development and land use planning, along with techniques for evaluation. Assessment of the urban planning process with case studies. May be offered for undergraduate or graduate credit. Prerequisite: GEOG 308 or consent of instructor. Three hours per week.

GEOG 510 METEOROLOGY

Analysis of physical processes and dynamics of the atmosphere. Topics include upper atmospheric flow, forecasting and severe weather. May be offered for undergraduate or graduate credit. Prerequisite: GEOG 201 or consent of instructor. Three hours per week.

GEOG 511 GEOMORPHOLOGY

Study of the surface of the earth and the geologic processes that modify it. Topics include the waethering and of erosion rocks, the deposition of sediments, the classification of landforms, and the long-term evolution of landscapes. One three-day weekend field trip is part of the course. Three hours lecture per week.

GEOG 513 APPLIED CLIMATOLOGY

Analysis of the impact of climate on the physical environment and human behavior. Topics include climatic change, contemporary climatic problems and the influence of climate on agriculture, and energy use. May be offered for undergraduate or graduate credit. Prerequisite: GEOG 201 or consent of instructor. Three hours per week.

GEOG 515 SELECTED PROBLEMS

Independent study permitting research or in-depth work on a selected topic to be indicated on studentís transcript. May be taken twice for credit under different subtitles. Intended for seniors with 18 or more hours in geography. May be offered for undergraduate or graduate credit. Prerequisite: Consent of department review committee.

GEOG 519 ADVANCED GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SCIENCE

Study of current theories and development trends in GIS technology. Emphasis on hands-on working knowledge utilizing ARC/INFO software. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week.

GEOG 522 READINGS IN GEOGRAPHY

Permits in-depth study of a selected topic to be indicated on studentís transcript. May be taken twice for credit under different subtitles. Intended for seniors with 18 or more hours in geography. May be offered for undergraduate or graduate credit. Prerequisite: Consent of department review committee.

GEOG 530 DIRECTED RESEARCH

Preparation of optional research project in masterís degree program under departmental direction.

GEOG 550 TOPICS IN GEOGRAPHY

Analysis of a selected systematic/regional topic to be entered on the studentís transcript. May be taken three times for credit under different subtitles. May be offered for undergraduate or graduate credit. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Three hours per week.

GEOG 560 INTERNSHIP

Provides students with opportunities to apply geographic/planning theory, techniques and knowledge as practicing professionals. Intended for seniors with 18 or more hours in geography. Cannot be used to satisfy requirements for the major. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and consent of department chair. Three hours per week for each credit hour. (P/F)

GEOG 575 FIELD PROBLEMS IN GEOGRAPHY

Geographic research field experience. Development of a research proposal, collection and analysis of data and the integration of such in a formal research paper. May be offered for undergraduate or graduate credit. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

GEOG 619 MANAGING GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS

Study of strategies for successful GIS management and implementation in an organization-wide context. Implementation management strategies are introduced through systematic user needs assessment, requirements specification, database design, application development, pilot project testing, implementation, operation, and maintenance. Public policy requirements and legal responsibilities for geographic records managment are also examined. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and GEOG 419 or GEOG 519. Three hours per week.

GEOG 630 GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION

Examines practical approaches for incorporating geographic information systems (GIS) technology into a public administration setting. Discusses implementation strategies, cost-benefit analyses, and strategies for overcoming technical and organizational boundaries. Case studies illustrate how public officials have successfully applied GIS to their specific needs. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, POSC 540, and GEOG 419 or GEOG 519. Three hours per week.

GEOG 640 GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS COOPERATIVE EXPERIENCE

A directed field study program which provides studens with an opportunity to apply GIS skills acquired in the classroom to real-world projects in the community. Additionally, a weekly seminar discussion gives participants a chance to peer-review the co-operative projects as well as receive expert guidance. Students are under the supervision of an advisor form the GIS faculty while participating in a short-term experience program in a business or government agency. Prerequisites: GEOG 619 and GEOG 630. Six hours per week.

GEOG 650 CAPSTONE GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS SEMINAR

Summarizes and synthesizes the skills, knowledge, and experience gained in the program. Students review a peer GIS implementation project, organizing and completing an assessment of the likelihood that the project achieved its goals. In addition, students support their analyses using the most current literature regarding GIS and Public Administration, emphasizing their particular area of interest. Prerequisite: GEOG 640. Three hours per week

GEOL 103 INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICAL GEOLOGY

Introduction to the nature and character of the Earthís crust and the geological processes that generate and shape landform features. Topics include minerals, rocks, earth structure and plate tectonics, geological processes and associated landforms. Three one-hour lectures and one two-hour laboratory per week. Meets General Education IVA or IVB (Prior to Fall 2008: IIIA or IIIB).

GEOL 206 HISTORICAL GEOLOGY

Study of the history of the earth and the principles used to decipher the earth's past from the rock record. Includes study of stratigraphic principles, key fossil groups and relative and absolute dating techniques. One weekend field trip is required. Prerequisite: C or better in GEOL 103. Three hours lecture, two hours lab per week.

GEOL 211 SEDIMENT ANALYSIS

Lab-based course designed to introduce students to the most common methodologies field scientists use to measure, analyze and classify sediments. Two hours laboratory per week.

GEOL 306 INTRODUCTION TO INVERTEBRATE PALEONTOLOGY

The systematic study of the major classes of invertebrate fossils and plants commonly preserved in the fossil record. Prerequisite: GEOL 206 or BIOL 213. Three hours laboratory per week.

GEOL 313 MINERALOGY AND OPTICAL PETROLOGY

Introduces students to the fundamentals of mineralogy and petrology, including crystallography, crystal chemistry and optical mineralogy as well as the occurrence and identification of sedimentary, igneous and metamorphic rocks in thin section. Learn how to use a petrographic microscope to identify minerals and rocks and understand their occurrence in the context of the tectonic setting from which they are derived. Prerequisites: GEOL 103, CHEM 121. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week.

GEOL 322 GEOLOGICAL OCEANOGRAPHY

Explore the major features of the ocean basins and seafloor as well as the processes responsible for their formation. Discuss geological and geophysical techniques for mapping and understanding these processes. Prerequisites: GEOG 111. Three hours per week.

GEOL 336 STRATIGRAPHY AND SEDIMENTOLOGY

Introduces students to the fundaments of stratigraphy and sedimentology, and places a particular emphasis on the identification, occurrence, and analysis of sediments and sedimentary rock facies. Numerous field trips apply lecture content in the field to reconstruct Appalachian geology. Learn how to map geologic rock formations in the field and measure stratigraphic section, two skills that are integral to any professional geologist and research geologist. Prerequisites: GEOL 206, 211. Three hours per week.

GEOL 405 ENVIRONMENTAL GEOLOGY

Study of natural hazards, human-induced environmental problems, and the dynamic interaction processes between humans and the environment. Emphasis placed on understanding of major issuess in environmental hazards, natural resources (water, mineral and energy), waste disposal, sustainable development and emergency management. Prerequisite: GEOL 103 or GEOG 104 or 105. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week.

GEOL 450 TOPICS IN GEOLOGY

Analysis of a selected geologic topic to be entered on the student's transcript. May be taken three time for credit under different subtitles. Prerequisite: Permission of department chair. One to four hours per week.

GEOL 465 EARTH SCIENCE SEMINAR

Discussions of the scientific process and timely topics in earth science and related fields. Requires participation and presentations. Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. Two hours per week.

GEOL 505 ENVIRONMENTAL GEOLOGY

Study of natural hazards, human-induced environmental problems, and the dynamic interaction processes between humans and the environment. Emphasis placed on understanding of major issuess in environmental hazards, natural resources (water, mineral and energy), waste disposal, sustainable development and emergency management. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; GEOL 103 or GEOG 104 or 105 or permission of the instructor. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week.
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