Perdue Hall

Economics & Finance

Economics & Finance Faculty


Arvi, Leonard
Faculty, Economics and Finance
Perdue Hall (PH) 208
410-677-6573 or ext 76573
lxarvisalisburyedu
[website]
 

Education:
M.S., Ph.D. (Finance), Florida International University, Miami
M.S. (Computer Science), Asian Institute of Technology, Thailand
B.S. (Chemistry), St. Joseph's College, India

Interests:
Finance Education, Behavioral Finance, Corporate Finance, Sustainable Real Estate, Technology in Finance

Website:
http://faculty.salisbury.edu/~lxarvi

Courses  []

2014 Spring

  • FINA 442-610 FINANCIAL DERIVATIVES
    Advanced study of security markets and investment alternatives. Topics include options, futures, advanced security analysis, portfolio theory, portfolio management and international dimensions of investing. Prerequisite: C or better in FINA 441. Three hours per week.
  • FINA 442-611 FINANCIAL DERIVATIVES
    Advanced study of security markets and investment alternatives. Topics include options, futures, advanced security analysis, portfolio theory, portfolio management and international dimensions of investing. Prerequisite: C or better in FINA 441. Three hours per week.
  • FINA 626-610 CORPORATE FINANCIAL MGMT
    A review of financial theory and techniques. Topics include capital acquisition, risk analysis, use of the capital asset pricing model, advanced capital budgeting and multinational corporate finance. Ethical concepts are covered where relevant. Prerequisites: Admission to the MBA program; completion of IVY software finance assessment and FINA 311 (or its equivalent) foundation course with a grade of C or better; ACCT 666 and ECON 601. Six hours per week for half a semester.

2014 Fall

  • FINA 311-001 FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT
    Addresses fundamental concepts in financial management such as security markets, interest rates, taxes, risk analysis, time value of money, valuation models and related global issues. Explains how financial managers help maximize the value of a firm by making capital budgeting, cost of capital and capital structure decisions. Prerequisites: Majors: admission to the professional program, ECON 211, ECON 212. Minors or others: junior status, ACCT 201, MATH 155, ECON 150 or ECON 211. Three hours per week.
  • FINA 311-002 FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT
    Addresses fundamental concepts in financial management such as security markets, interest rates, taxes, risk analysis, time value of money, valuation models and related global issues. Explains how financial managers help maximize the value of a firm by making capital budgeting, cost of capital and capital structure decisions. Prerequisites: Majors: admission to the professional program, ECON 211, ECON 212. Minors or others: junior status, ACCT 201, MATH 155, ECON 150 or ECON 211. Three hours per week.
  • FINA 443-611 ESSENTIALS OF REAL ESTATE
    Analysis of the structure of real estate markets. Study of principles of mortgage lending, property appraisal and real estate investments. Prerequisite: B or better in FINA 311. Three hours per week.

Visit the GullNet Logon Page to logon and view the entire schedule of classes.

Awards, Scholarship & Creative Works:  []

Article(s)

Arvi, L., Jha, A. & Shankar, S. 
(2014). 
Access to bank loans while in bankruptcy: The role of single vs. multiple banking relations. 
Managerial Finance, 
Arvi, L., Shankar, S. & Jha, A. 
(2014). 
Rate of Return & Information Asymmetry Around Multiple Restatement Firms. 
The Journal of Intenational Finance & Economics, 
Khazeh, K., Arvi, L. & Winder, R. 
(2014). 
A Comparison of Value-at-Risk Approaches for Multi-national Enterprises. 
International Review of Business Research Papers, 
Shankar, S., Arvi, L, & Jha, A. 
(2014). 
Rate of return and information asymmetry around multiple restatement firms.  
The Journal of International Finance & Economics, 
Arunachalam, A. & Dandapani, K. 
(2011). 
The Impact of Discount Brokerage Fees on Online Stock Trading: A Study of the Stock Market in Thailand. 
The International Journal of Finance, 
23(2), 
Arunachalam, A., Lawrence, E. R. & Prakash, A. J. 
(2009). 
Investor sentiment & perceived prices of stocks. 
The International Journal of Finance, 
21(3), 
Arunachalam, A., Lawrence, E. & Prakish, A. 
(2008). 
Managerial sentiment & project selection. 
Journal of Emerging Financial Markets, 
1(1), 
31-49. 
Arunachalam, A. 
(2007). 
Time value of money: The case of arithmetic & geometric growth in cash flows & their applications. 
Proceedings of the Seventh International Conference on Operations & Quantitative Management, 

Awards(s)

Leonard Arvi (2013). Faculty Teaching Award - Executive Advisory Council, Franklin P. Perdue School of Business.

Presentations

Arvi, L. (2013). Rate of return & information asymmetry around multiple restatement firms. Presented at Western Hemispheric Trade Conference, Laredo, TX.
Arvi, L. (2013). Teaching Financial Derivatives using real market data: Interactive Brokers. Presented at Salisbury University 3rd Annual Teaching & Learning Conference, Salisbury, MD.
Khazeh, K., Arvi, L., & Winder, R. (2013). A Comparison of Value-At-Risk Approaches for Multinational Enterprises. Presented at 21st International Business Research Conference , Toronto, Canada.
Arvi, L. (2012). Experiential Learning: Investments. Presented at Salisbury University 2nd Annual Teaching & Learning Conference, Salisbury, MD.
Arvi, L. (2012). Panelist, Integrating McGraw-Hill’s Connect with Blackboard. Presented at Salisbury University 2nd Annual Teaching & Learning Conference, Salisbury, MD.
Arvi, L. (2012). Experiential Learning: Sustainable realestate projects by students. Presented at Salisbury University 2nd Annual Teaching & Learning Conference, Salisbury, MD.
Arvi, L. (2012). Management education in U.S: Lessons for Indian business schools. Presented at Jamal Institute of Management, Jamal Mohammed College, Trichy.
Arvi, L. (2012). Business education in the U.S. Presented at Joseph Institute of Management, St. Joseph's College, Trichy.
Arvi, L. (2012). All About Finance, Admitted Students Day. Presented at Perdue School of Business, Salisbury University, Salisbury, MD.
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Arunachalam, A. (2010). Dubai debt crisis. Presented at Dept. of Commerce, St. Joseph's College, India, Tiruchirapalli, India.
Arunachalam, A. (2010). Investor sentiment & the perceived price of stocks. Presented at the 4th National Conference on Indian Capital Market: Emerging Issues. Presented at National Conference on Indian Capital Market: Emerging Issues, New Delhi, India.
Arunachalam, A. (2010). What went wrong with Starbucks? Financial analysis & business evalulation: Case study.  Discussant at the 2010 Annual Meeting. Presented at Southwestern Finance Association, Dallas, TX.
Arunachalam, A. (2010). Financial crisis & aftermath: Future of US dollar. Presented at Rotary Club of Tiruchirapalli Rockcity, India, Tiruchirapalli, India.
Arunachalam, A. & Dandapani, K. (2010). Impact on discount brokerage fees on online trading: Case of Thai stock market. Presented at Global Finance Conference, Poland.
Arunachalam, A. & Dandapani, K. (2010). Impact on discount brokerage fees on online trading: Case of Thai stock market. Presented at Global Finance Conference, Poland.
Arunachalam, A. & Whitworth, J. (Co-Chairs). (2010). Technology in financial education: A teaching workshop. Presented at the 2010 Annual Meeting. Presented at Southwestern Finance Association, Dallas, TX.
Arunachalam, A. (Chairperson) (2010). Behavior & Asset Prices. Presented at the Financial Management Association Annual Meeting 2010. Presented at Financial Management Association, New York City.
Arunachalam, A. (Discussant) (2010). Chasing Trends in  US Housing Market. Presented at the Financial Management Association Annual Meeting 2010. Presented at Financial Management Association, New York City.
Arunachalam, A. (Discussant) (2010). Why Do Financial Strength Measures Forecast Future Stock Returns? Evidence from Subsequent Demand by Institutional Investors. Presented at the Financial Management Association Annual Meeting 2010. Presented at Financial Management Association, New York City.
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Shakur, A., Shetty, S. & Arunachalam, A. (2010). Woefully imperfect market puzzle. Presented at the 2010 Annual Meeting of the Southwestern Finance Association. Presented at Southwestern Finance Association, Dallas, TX.
Arunachalam, A. (2009). Globalization: The ethos of 21st century America & its influence on law, economy & integrated communities. Presented at University of Maryland Eastern Shore Business Colloquium, Princess Anne, MD.
Arunachalam, A. (2009). Managerial sentiment & firm value. Presented at the 2009 Annual Meeting. Presented at Southwestern Finance Association, Oklahoma City, OK.
Arunachalam, A. (Discussant) (2009). Herding on the minimum: Strategic quote behaviour in the LIBOR fixing. Presented at the 2009 annual meeting. Presented at Southwestern Finance Association, Oklahoma City, OK.
Arunachalam, A. (Discussant). (2009). Sticky mortgage rates during the decade 1994-2004. Presented at the 2009 annual meeting. Presented at Southwestern Finance Association, Oklahoma City, OK.
Arunachalam, A., Lawrence, E. R. & Prakash, A. J. (2009). Investor sentiment & stock trading strategy. Presented at the 2009 annual meeting. Presented at Southwestern Finance Association, Oklahoma City, OK.
Arunachalam, A., Lawrence, E. R. & Prakash, A. J. (2009). Investor sentiment & stock trading strategy. Presented at the 2009 annual meeting. Presented at Eastern Finance Association, Washington, D. C..
Arunachalam, A., Lawrence, E. R. & Prakash, A. J. (2008). Investor sentiment & under-pricing/over-pricing of stocks. Presented at the 35th annual meeting. Presented at Academy of Economics & Finance, Nashville, TN.
Arunachalam, A., Lawrence, E. R. & Prakash, A. J. (2008). Managerial sentiment & project selection. Presented at the 2008 annual meeting. Presented at Midwest Finance Association, San Antonio, TX.

Other

Arunachalam, A., External Examiner, Ph.D. dissertation, C. Mahimai Arul. (2010). A study on the effectiveness of advertisement in the ethical perspective, among the youth in Tiruchirappalli corporation.. Presented at Bharathidason University, India.
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Please send any updates to smfridie@salisbury.edu.

Press Releases: []

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Other Press Releases

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Bradford, Randy
Lecturer, Economics and Finance
rlbradfordsalisburyedu
 
Courses  []

2014 Spring

  • ECON 211-159 MICRO-ECONOMIC PRINCIPLES
    Introduction to the ideas and tools economists use to understand human behavior constrained by scarce resources. Analytical tools introduced include supply and demand analysis, elasticities, models of perfect and imperfect competition. These tools will be used to study topics such as consumer and producer decision making, taxation, environmental quality and health care. Three hours per week. Meets General Education IIIB or IIIC (Prior to Fall 2008: IIB).
  • ECON 211-160 MICRO-ECONOMIC PRINCIPLES
    Introduction to the ideas and tools economists use to understand human behavior constrained by scarce resources. Analytical tools introduced include supply and demand analysis, elasticities, models of perfect and imperfect competition. These tools will be used to study topics such as consumer and producer decision making, taxation, environmental quality and health care. Three hours per week. Meets General Education IIIB or IIIC (Prior to Fall 2008: IIB).

2014 Fall

  • ECON 211-159 MICRO-ECONOMIC PRINCIPLES
    Introduction to the ideas and tools economists use to understand human behavior constrained by scarce resources. Analytical tools introduced include supply and demand analysis, elasticities, models of perfect and imperfect competition. These tools will be used to study topics such as consumer and producer decision making, taxation, environmental quality and health care. Three hours per week. Meets General Education IIIB or IIIC (Prior to Fall 2008: IIB).
  • ECON 211-160 MICRO-ECONOMIC PRINCIPLES
    Introduction to the ideas and tools economists use to understand human behavior constrained by scarce resources. Analytical tools introduced include supply and demand analysis, elasticities, models of perfect and imperfect competition. These tools will be used to study topics such as consumer and producer decision making, taxation, environmental quality and health care. Three hours per week. Meets General Education IIIB or IIIC (Prior to Fall 2008: IIB).

Visit the GullNet Logon Page to logon and view the entire schedule of classes.

Caviglia-Harris, Jill
Faculty, Economics and Finance
Perdue Hall (PH) 214
410-548-5591 or ext 85591
jlcaviglia-harrissalisburyedu
[website]
 

Education:
Ph.D. Economics, The University of Tennessee, May 1998

Interests:
Jill Caviglia-Harris is Professor of Economics in the Economics & Finance and Environmental Studies Departments at Salisbury University. She received her B.A. in Economics and Mathematics from Binghamton University, and her M.A. and Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Tennessee. At Salisbury University, she teaches courses in environmental and natural resource economics and microeconomics. She was awarded Salisbury University%%%s Distinguished Faculty Award for excellence in teaching and research in 2004, the 2010 State of Maryland Board of Regent%%%s Award for excellence in teaching, the Salisbury University 2010 Outstanding Mentor Award, the 2010 Southern Economic Association Kenneth G. Elzinga Teaching Award, the 2012-2013 Wilson H. Elkins Professorship, University System of Maryland, and most recently a 2013-2014 Leopold Leadership Fellowship from Stanford University.

Caviglia-Harris' research is focused on understanding the tradeoffs that exist between development and deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon. Her approach includes the collection and analysis of survey, geographical information systems (GIS), and remote sensing data at the household level to create a longitudinal data that can be used to investigate multiple issues as they relate to welfare, poverty and land cover/land use trajectories over time. She has published in such journals as Environment and Development Economics, Economic Development and Cultural Change, Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Agricultural Economics, Ecological Economics, and the Review of Regional Studies. This research has been funded by the National Science Foundation and other organizations for the past 15 years. A second dimension of her research includes the investigation of best practices for teaching and motivating students.

Website:
http://facultyfp.salisbury.edu/jlcaviglia-harris/

Courses  []

2014 Spring

  • ECON 211-505 MICRO-ECONOMIC PRINCIPLES
    Introduction to the ideas and tools economists use to understand human behavior constrained by scarce resources. Analytical tools introduced include supply and demand analysis, elasticities, models of perfect and imperfect competition. These tools will be used to study topics such as consumer and producer decision making, taxation, environmental quality and health care. Three hours per week. Meets General Education IIIB or IIIC (Prior to Fall 2008: IIB).
  • ECON 211-506 MICRO-ECONOMIC PRINCIPLES
    Introduction to the ideas and tools economists use to understand human behavior constrained by scarce resources. Analytical tools introduced include supply and demand analysis, elasticities, models of perfect and imperfect competition. These tools will be used to study topics such as consumer and producer decision making, taxation, environmental quality and health care. Three hours per week. Meets General Education IIIB or IIIC (Prior to Fall 2008: IIB).

2014 Fall

  • ENVR 210-001 PRINCIPLES OF ENVIRO ECON
    Introduction to the ideas and tools economists use to understand human behavior that is constrained by scarce resources with applications to environmental policy. Analytic tools, including demand and supply analysis, will be used to introduce students to policies to address externalities, including the use of taxes, subsidies and marketable pollution permits. Three hours per week with enhancement.
  • ENVR 210-002 PRINCIPLES OF ENVIRO ECON
    Introduction to the ideas and tools economists use to understand human behavior that is constrained by scarce resources with applications to environmental policy. Analytic tools, including demand and supply analysis, will be used to introduce students to policies to address externalities, including the use of taxes, subsidies and marketable pollution permits. Three hours per week with enhancement.
  • ENVR 400-001 CONTEMPORARY ENVR ISSUES
    Discussion seminar focused upon the review and analysis of environmental topics in the mainstream media. Prerequisite: ENVR 102. One hour per week.

Visit the GullNet Logon Page to logon and view the entire schedule of classes.

Awards, Scholarship & Creative Works:  []

Article(s)

Hill, B. & Caviglia-Harris, J. 
(In Press). 
Assessment plan & design: A model for enhancing instruction in economics courses. 
International Review of Economics Education, 
Caviglia-Harris, J., Sills, E. & Mullan, K. 
(2013). 
Migration and Mobility on the Amazon Frontier. 
Population & Environment, 
34(3), 
338-369. 
Caviglia-Harris, J., Hall, S., Mullen, K., MacIntyre, C., Bauch, S., Harris, D., Sills, E., Dawson, J, Klitch, B., Roberts, D., Toomey, M. & Cha, H. 
(2012). 
Improving household surveys through computer assisted data collection: Use of touch-screen laptops in challenging environments. 
Field Methods, 
24, 
74-94. 
Caviglia-Harris, J. & Harris, D.W. 
(2011). 
The impact of settlement design on tropical deforestation rates & resulting land cover patterns. 
Agriculture & Resource Economics Review, 
40(3), 
Caviglia-Harris, J., Chambers, D. & Kahn, J. 
(2009). 
Taking the "U" out of Kuznets: A comprehensive analysis of the EKC & environmental degradation. 
Ecological Economics, 
68(4), 
1149-1159. 
Sills, E. O. & Caviglia-Harris, J. L. 
(2009). 
Evolution of an Amazon frontier: Determinants of land value in Rondonia, Brazil. 
Land Use Policy, 
26(1), 
55-67. 
Caviglia-Harris, J. L., & Harris, D. W. 
(2008). 
Integrating survey & remote sensing data to analyze land use at a fine scale: Insights from agricultural households in the Brazilian Amazon. 
International Regional Science Review, 
31(2), 
115-137. 
Caviglia-Harris, J. L. 
(2006). 
Attendance & achievement in economics: Investigating the impact of attendance policies & absentee rates on student performance. 
Journal of Economic & Finance Education, 
4(2), 
2-15. 
Shone, B. M. & Caviglia-Harris, J. L. 
(2006). 
Quantifying & comparing the value of non-timber forest products in the Amazon. 
Ecological Economics, 
58(2), 
249-267. 
Caviglia-Harris, J. L. & Sills, E. 
(2005). 
Land use & income diversification: Comparing traditional & colonist populations in the Brazilian Amazon. 
Agricultural Economics, 
32, 
221-237. 
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Caviglia-Harris, J. L. 
(2004). 
Academic achievement in large lectures: Analyzing the effects of attendance rates & class motivation on economics exam grades. 
Journal of Economic & Finance Education, 
3(1), 
48-60. 
Caviglia-Harris, J. L. 
(2004). 
Household production & forest clearing: The role of farming in the development of the Amazon. 
Environment & Development Economics, 
9(2), 
181-202. 
Caviglia-Harris, J. L. & Hatley, J. 
(2004). 
Interdisciplinary teaching: Analyzing consensus & conflict in environmental studies. 
International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, 
5(4), 
395-403. 
Caviglia-Harris, J. L. & Hatley, J. D. 
(2004). 
Interdisciplinary teaching: Analyzing consensus & conflict in environmental studies. 
International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, 
5(4), 
395-403. 
Caviglia-Harris, J. L. 
(2003). 
Introducing undergraduates to economics in an interdisciplinary setting. 
Journal of Economic Education, 
34(3), 
195-203. 
Caviglia-Harris, J. L. 
(2003). 
Sustainable agricultural practices in Rondonia, Brazil: Do local farmer organizations impact adoption rates? 
Economic Development & Cultural Change, 
52(1), 
23-50. 
Caviglia-Harris, J. L., Kahn, J. R. & Green, T. 
(2003). 
Demand-side policies for environmental protection & sustainable usage of renewable resources. 
Ecological Economics, 
45(1), 
119-132. 
Casey, J. F., Caviglia-Harris, J. L., Kahn, J. R. & Rivas, A. 
(2002). 
Information & the subsistence farmer's decision to deforest in Latin America. 
International Journal of Sustainable Development, 
5(4), 
392-414. 
Caviglia, J. L. & Kahn, J. R. 
(2001). 
Diffusion of sustainable agriculture in the Brazilian tropical rain forest: A Discrete choice analysis. 
Economic Development & Cultural Change, 
49(2), 
311-333. 

Awards(s)

Jill Caviglia-Harris (2013). Faculty Appreciation Award - Salisbury University Alumni Association, Salisbury, MD.
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Jill Caviglia-Harris & Michael Lewis (2013). Wilson H. Elkins Professorship - University System of Maryland (USM).
Michael Lewis & Jill Caviglia-Harris (2012). Wilson H. Elkins Professorship - University System of Maryland (USM).
Jill Caviglia-Harris (2010). Kenneth G. Elzinga Teaching Award - Southern Economic Association (SEA).
Jill Caviglia-Harris (2010). Outstanding Research Mentor Award - Student Research Conference, Salisbury University.
Jill Caviglia-Harris (2010). Regents' Faculty Award for Excellence for teaching excellence - Board of Regents, University System of Maryland (USM).
Jill Caviglia-Harris (2004). Distinguished Faculty Award - Salisbury University, Salisbury, MD.

Book(s)

Caviglia, J. L. (1999) Sustainable agriculture in Brazil: Economic development and deforestation. UK: Edward Elgar Publishing.

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Please send any updates to smfridie@salisbury.edu.

Press Releases: []
Chambers, Dustin
Faculty, Economics and Finance
Perdue Hall (PH) 221
410-543-6320 or ext 36320
dlchamberssalisburyedu
 

Education:
Ph.D. Economics, University of California - Riverside, June 2004

Interests:
Dr. Chambers' research interests include econometrics, data science, development economics, and public policy.

Courses  []

2014 Spring

  • ECON 212-614 MACRO-ECONOMIC PRINCIPLES
    Explores forces behind business consumer purchases, capital spending and the balance of payments and their relationship to unemployment, inflation and the value of the dollar abroad. Also examines the effect of government spending, taxation and money supply policies on the economy's performance. Prerequisite: ECON 211. Three hours per week. Meets General Education IIIB or IIIC (Prior to Fall 2008: IIB).
  • ECON 212-615 MACRO-ECONOMIC PRINCIPLES
    Explores forces behind business consumer purchases, capital spending and the balance of payments and their relationship to unemployment, inflation and the value of the dollar abroad. Also examines the effect of government spending, taxation and money supply policies on the economy's performance. Prerequisite: ECON 211. Three hours per week. Meets General Education IIIB or IIIC (Prior to Fall 2008: IIB).
  • ECON 212-616 MACRO-ECONOMIC PRINCIPLES
    Explores forces behind business consumer purchases, capital spending and the balance of payments and their relationship to unemployment, inflation and the value of the dollar abroad. Also examines the effect of government spending, taxation and money supply policies on the economy's performance. Prerequisite: ECON 211. Three hours per week. Meets General Education IIIB or IIIC (Prior to Fall 2008: IIB).
  • ECON 338-001 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ECONOMICS
    In-depth study of varying economic issues not covered in other economics courses. Students may repeat this course under a different topic. Prerequisites: ECON 211, 212. Three hours per week.
  • FINA 338-001 SPECIAL TOPICS IN FINANCE
    Advanced study of varying finance topics based on students’ interests and needs. May be repeated once for credit under different subtitle. May substitute for finance major elective depending on the topic (see director of undergraduate studies). Major Prerequisites: Varies by topics and Admission to Professional Program. Non-Major Prerequisites: Varies by topics and junior standing. Three hours per week.

2014 Summer I

  • ECON 211-701 MICRO-ECONOMIC PRINCIPLES
    Introduction to the ideas and tools economists use to understand human behavior constrained by scarce resources. Analytical tools introduced include supply and demand analysis, elasticities, models of perfect and imperfect competition. These tools will be used to study topics such as consumer and producer decision making, taxation, environmental quality and health care. Three hours per week. Meets General Education IIIB or IIIC (Prior to Fall 2008: IIB).

2014 Summer II

  • ECON 212-701 MACRO-ECONOMIC PRINCIPLES
    Explores forces behind business consumer purchases, capital spending and the balance of payments and their relationship to unemployment, inflation and the value of the dollar abroad. Also examines the effect of government spending, taxation and money supply policies on the economy's performance. Prerequisite: ECON 211. Three hours per week. Meets General Education IIIB or IIIC (Prior to Fall 2008: IIB).

2014 Fall

  • ECON 212-613 MACRO-ECONOMIC PRINCIPLES
    Explores forces behind business consumer purchases, capital spending and the balance of payments and their relationship to unemployment, inflation and the value of the dollar abroad. Also examines the effect of government spending, taxation and money supply policies on the economy's performance. Prerequisite: ECON 211. Three hours per week. Meets General Education IIIB or IIIC (Prior to Fall 2008: IIB).
  • ECON 212-614 MACRO-ECONOMIC PRINCIPLES
    Explores forces behind business consumer purchases, capital spending and the balance of payments and their relationship to unemployment, inflation and the value of the dollar abroad. Also examines the effect of government spending, taxation and money supply policies on the economy's performance. Prerequisite: ECON 211. Three hours per week. Meets General Education IIIB or IIIC (Prior to Fall 2008: IIB).
  • ECON 430-001 ECONOMETRICS
    Principles of econometric model building, empirical testing and statistical inference. Introduction to the theory and application of time series and limited dependents variable models. Prerequisites: C or better in all of the following: ECON 211, ECON 212, MATH 155, MATH 160 (or 201), INFO 281. Three hours per week.

Visit the GullNet Logon Page to logon and view the entire schedule of classes.

Awards, Scholarship & Creative Works:  []

Article(s)

Caviglia-Harris, J., Chambers, D. & Kahn, J. 
(2009). 
Taking the "U" out of Kuznets: A comprehensive analysis of the EKC & environmental degradation. 
Ecological Economics, 
68(4), 
1149-1159. 
Chambers, D. L., Wu, Y. & Yao, H. 
(2008). 
The Impact of Past Growth on Poverty in Chinese Provinces. Named one of the Journal of Asian Economics' "Top 25 Hottest Articles" in the category of economics, econometrics and finance. 
Journal of Asian Economics, 
19(4), 
348-357. 
Chambers, D., Wu, Y., & Yao, H. 
(2008). 
A Tale of Two Provinces: How Growth Can Help or Hinder Equality in China? 
International Research Journal of Finance & Economics, 
Issue 12, 
214-219. 
Chambers, D. 
(2007). 
Trading places: Does past growth impact inequality? 
Journal of Development Economics, 
82(1), 
257-266. 

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Press Releases: []

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Chambers, Silvana
Faculty, Economics and Finance
Perdue Hall (PH) 204
410-543-6318 or ext 36318
sschamberssalisburyedu
 

Education:
B.A., University of Heidelberg; B.A., California State University - Fresno; M.A., California State University - Los Angeles

Courses  []

2014 Spring

  • ECON 150-001 PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS
    A general introduction to economic ideas and analysis with emphasis on economic institutions and processes in the context of a market economy. Includes basic discussion of micro-economic and macroeconomic topics including economic decision making in the context of scarce resources, price theory, monetary and fiscal policy, etc. This course is intended for nonbusiness majors. This course cannot be taken concurrently with or after having completed ECON 211 or 212. Three hours per week. Meets General Education IIIB or IIIC (Prior to Fall 2008: IIB).
  • ECON 212-001 MACRO-ECONOMIC PRINCIPLES
    Explores forces behind business consumer purchases, capital spending and the balance of payments and their relationship to unemployment, inflation and the value of the dollar abroad. Also examines the effect of government spending, taxation and money supply policies on the economy's performance. Prerequisite: ECON 211. Three hours per week. Meets General Education IIIB or IIIC (Prior to Fall 2008: IIB).
  • ECON 212-002 MACRO-ECONOMIC PRINCIPLES
    Explores forces behind business consumer purchases, capital spending and the balance of payments and their relationship to unemployment, inflation and the value of the dollar abroad. Also examines the effect of government spending, taxation and money supply policies on the economy's performance. Prerequisite: ECON 211. Three hours per week. Meets General Education IIIB or IIIC (Prior to Fall 2008: IIB).
  • ECON 305-001 INTERMEDIATE MACRO-THEORY
    Study of the theory of economic aggregates through the use of national income accounts to determine the effect of certain key variables on employment and production. Key variables studied include savings and investment, the quantity of money, the velocity of money, the rate of interest and consumption. Prerequisites: C or better in all of the following: ECON 211, ECON 212, MATH 155, MATH 160 (or 201). Three hours per week.

2014 Summer II

  • ECON 150-701 PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS
    A general introduction to economic ideas and analysis with emphasis on economic institutions and processes in the context of a market economy. Includes basic discussion of micro-economic and macroeconomic topics including economic decision making in the context of scarce resources, price theory, monetary and fiscal policy, etc. This course is intended for nonbusiness majors. This course cannot be taken concurrently with or after having completed ECON 211 or 212. Three hours per week. Meets General Education IIIB or IIIC (Prior to Fall 2008: IIB).

2014 Fall

  • ECON 150-001 PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS
    A general introduction to economic ideas and analysis with emphasis on economic institutions and processes in the context of a market economy. Includes basic discussion of micro-economic and macroeconomic topics including economic decision making in the context of scarce resources, price theory, monetary and fiscal policy, etc. This course is intended for nonbusiness majors. This course cannot be taken concurrently with or after having completed ECON 211 or 212. Three hours per week. Meets General Education IIIB or IIIC (Prior to Fall 2008: IIB).
  • ECON 211-503 MICRO-ECONOMIC PRINCIPLES
    Introduction to the ideas and tools economists use to understand human behavior constrained by scarce resources. Analytical tools introduced include supply and demand analysis, elasticities, models of perfect and imperfect competition. These tools will be used to study topics such as consumer and producer decision making, taxation, environmental quality and health care. Three hours per week. Meets General Education IIIB or IIIC (Prior to Fall 2008: IIB).
  • ECON 211-505 MICRO-ECONOMIC PRINCIPLES
    Introduction to the ideas and tools economists use to understand human behavior constrained by scarce resources. Analytical tools introduced include supply and demand analysis, elasticities, models of perfect and imperfect competition. These tools will be used to study topics such as consumer and producer decision making, taxation, environmental quality and health care. Three hours per week. Meets General Education IIIB or IIIC (Prior to Fall 2008: IIB).
  • ECON 212-002 MACRO-ECONOMIC PRINCIPLES
    Explores forces behind business consumer purchases, capital spending and the balance of payments and their relationship to unemployment, inflation and the value of the dollar abroad. Also examines the effect of government spending, taxation and money supply policies on the economy's performance. Prerequisite: ECON 211. Three hours per week. Meets General Education IIIB or IIIC (Prior to Fall 2008: IIB).

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Claggett, Tylor
Faculty, Economics and Finance
Perdue Hall (PH) 218
410-677-5021 or ext 75021
etclaggettsalisburyedu
 
Courses  []

2014 Spring

  • FINA 311-003 FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT
    Addresses fundamental concepts in financial management such as security markets, interest rates, taxes, risk analysis, time value of money, valuation models and related global issues. Explains how financial managers help maximize the value of a firm by making capital budgeting, cost of capital and capital structure decisions. Prerequisites: Majors: admission to the professional program, ECON 211, ECON 212. Minors or others: junior status, ACCT 201, MATH 155, ECON 150 or ECON 211. Three hours per week.
  • FINA 311-004 FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT
    Addresses fundamental concepts in financial management such as security markets, interest rates, taxes, risk analysis, time value of money, valuation models and related global issues. Explains how financial managers help maximize the value of a firm by making capital budgeting, cost of capital and capital structure decisions. Prerequisites: Majors: admission to the professional program, ECON 211, ECON 212. Minors or others: junior status, ACCT 201, MATH 155, ECON 150 or ECON 211. Three hours per week.
  • FINA 445-001 FINANCIAL INSTITUTI & MARKETS
    Examines the structure and functions of depository and non-depository financial institutions, the money and capital markets, and the role of government in the financial markets. Prerequisite: B or better in FINA 311 or economics major with senior status. Three hours per week.

2014 Fall

  • FINA 440-001 CORPORATE FINANCE
    Study of corporate financial policy issues within the context of value creation. Topics include in-depth analysis of advanced capital budgeting methods, capital structure policy, dividend policy, derivatives and hedging risk within the context of corporate financial policy. Case studies, application-oriented articles and daily media reports used to bridge the academic/theoretical arguments to the real life problems/situations. Prerequisite: B or better in FINA 311. Three hours per week.
  • FINA 440-002 CORPORATE FINANCE
    Study of corporate financial policy issues within the context of value creation. Topics include in-depth analysis of advanced capital budgeting methods, capital structure policy, dividend policy, derivatives and hedging risk within the context of corporate financial policy. Case studies, application-oriented articles and daily media reports used to bridge the academic/theoretical arguments to the real life problems/situations. Prerequisite: B or better in FINA 311. Three hours per week.
  • FINA 445-001 FINANCIAL INSTITUTI & MARKETS
    Examines the structure and functions of depository and non-depository financial institutions, the money and capital markets, and the role of government in the financial markets. Prerequisite: B or better in FINA 311 or economics major with senior status. Three hours per week.

Visit the GullNet Logon Page to logon and view the entire schedule of classes.

Awards, Scholarship & Creative Works:  []

Article(s)

Claggett, T. & Ervin, D. 
(2008). 
International diversification of the lower 400 firms of the S&P 500 Index. 
Southern Business Review, 
33(1), 
29-37. 
Claggett, E. T. & Smoluk, H. J. 
(2002). 
Explaining T-Bill term premiums with embedded options. 
The Kentucky Journal of Economics & Business, 
21, 
87-99. 
Claggett, E. T. & Stutzman, J. R. 
(2002). 
A Note on international business growth in U. S. multinational firms. 
Southern Business Review, 
28(1), 
11-19. 

Awards(s)

Claggett, T. (2008-2009). Fulbright Scholar Award - U. S. Dept. of State, Council for International Exchange of Scholars.

* * *

Please send any updates to smfridie@salisbury.edu.

Press Releases: []
Emerson, Jamie
Faculty, Economics and Finance
Perdue Hall (PH) 209
410-677-6578 or ext 76578
jdemersonsalisburyedu
 

Education:
1993, BA - Double Major: Economics and Mathematics, State University of New York at Geneseo
1995, MS - Mathematics, Syracuse University
2001, PhD - Economics, Syracuse University

Interests:
Research interests include:
Econometrics - both theoretical and applied, with particular interest in panel data models with long time series dimension.

Teaching interests include:
Microeconomics, Macroeconomics, Econometrics, Game Theory

Courses  []

2014 Spring

  • ECON 211-007 MICRO-ECONOMIC PRINCIPLES
    Introduction to the ideas and tools economists use to understand human behavior constrained by scarce resources. Analytical tools introduced include supply and demand analysis, elasticities, models of perfect and imperfect competition. These tools will be used to study topics such as consumer and producer decision making, taxation, environmental quality and health care. Three hours per week. Meets General Education IIIB or IIIC (Prior to Fall 2008: IIB).
  • ECON 211-008 MICRO-ECONOMIC PRINCIPLES
    Introduction to the ideas and tools economists use to understand human behavior constrained by scarce resources. Analytical tools introduced include supply and demand analysis, elasticities, models of perfect and imperfect competition. These tools will be used to study topics such as consumer and producer decision making, taxation, environmental quality and health care. Three hours per week. Meets General Education IIIB or IIIC (Prior to Fall 2008: IIB).
  • ECON 403-001 MONETARY PLCY & US ECONOMY
    Introduction to how the Federal Reserve (the Fed) formulates and carries out monetary policy to achieve the twin goals of price stability and sustainable economic growth in order to expand and advance students' understanding of monetary policy in the economy. Coverage includes how policy is transmitted to the nation's economy through the banking system and financial markets, the domestic and international economic environment that influences monetary policymaking, and the implications of policy decisions for the domestic and international economies. Relevant macroeconomics and monetary theories to guide policy decisions are examined. Prerequisites: C or better in ECON 211 and ECON 212; Pre/Co-requisite: ECON 305. Three hours per week.

Visit the GullNet Logon Page to logon and view the entire schedule of classes.

Awards, Scholarship & Creative Works:  []

Article(s)

Emerson, J. 
(2011). 
Consumption Saving Investigation: United States. 
Journal for Economic Educators, 
11(1), 
39-46. 
Emerson, J. 
(2011). 
Unemployment & labor force participation in the United States. 
Economics Letters, 
111(3), 
203-206. 
Emerson, J. 
(2010). 
Oil Prices & Economic Activity: A Brief Update. 
Economics Bulletin, 
30(2), 
1411-1424. 
Atesoglu, H. S. & Emerson, J. 
(2009). 
Long-Run Monetary Neutrality. 
Applied Economics, 
41(16), 
2025-2036. 
Atesoglu, H.S. & Emerson, J. 
(2008). 
Fiscal Policy, Profits, & Investment: Some Additional Evidence. 
Applied Economics Letters, 
15(13), 
1047-1051. 
Emerson, J. 
(2007). 
Cointegration of analysis & the choice of lag length 
Applied Economics Letters, 
14(12), 
881-885. 

* * *

Please send any updates to smfridie@salisbury.edu.

Ervin, Danny
Faculty, Economics and Finance
Perdue Hall (PH) 219
410-543-6329 or ext 36329
dmervinsalisburyedu
[website]
 

Website:
http://facultyfp.salisbury.edu/dmervin/

Courses  []
  • ECON 338-001 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ECONOMICS
    In-depth study of varying economic issues not covered in other economics courses. Students may repeat this course under a different topic. Prerequisites: ECON 211, 212. Three hours per week.
  • FINA 311-001 FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT
    Addresses fundamental concepts in financial management such as security markets, interest rates, taxes, risk analysis, time value of money, valuation models and related global issues. Explains how financial managers help maximize the value of a firm by making capital budgeting, cost of capital and capital structure decisions. Prerequisites: Majors: admission to the professional program, ECON 211, ECON 212. Minors or others: junior status, ACCT 201, MATH 155, ECON 150 or ECON 211. Three hours per week.
  • FINA 311-002 FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT
    Addresses fundamental concepts in financial management such as security markets, interest rates, taxes, risk analysis, time value of money, valuation models and related global issues. Explains how financial managers help maximize the value of a firm by making capital budgeting, cost of capital and capital structure decisions. Prerequisites: Majors: admission to the professional program, ECON 211, ECON 212. Minors or others: junior status, ACCT 201, MATH 155, ECON 150 or ECON 211. Three hours per week.
  • FINA 338-001 SPECIAL TOPICS IN FINANCE
    Advanced study of varying finance topics based on students’ interests and needs. May be repeated once for credit under different subtitle. May substitute for finance major elective depending on the topic (see director of undergraduate studies). Major Prerequisites: Varies by topics and Admission to Professional Program. Non-Major Prerequisites: Varies by topics and junior standing. Three hours per week.
  • FINA 440-001 CORPORATE FINANCE
    Study of corporate financial policy issues within the context of value creation. Topics include in-depth analysis of advanced capital budgeting methods, capital structure policy, dividend policy, derivatives and hedging risk within the context of corporate financial policy. Case studies, application-oriented articles and daily media reports used to bridge the academic/theoretical arguments to the real life problems/situations. Prerequisite: B or better in FINA 311. Three hours per week.

Visit the GullNet Logon Page to logon and view the entire schedule of classes.

Awards, Scholarship & Creative Works:  []

Article(s)

Claggett, T. & Ervin, D. 
(2008). 
International diversification of the lower 400 firms of the S&P 500 Index. 
Southern Business Review, 
33(1), 
29-37. 
McDermott, E. P. & Ervin, D. M. 
(2005). 
The influence of procedural & distributive variables on settlement rates in employment discrimination mediation. 
Journal of Dispute Resolution, 
1, 
45. 
Smith, K. J., Ervin, D. M., & Davy, J. A. 
(2003). 
An examination of the antecedents of cheating among finance students 
Journal of Financial Education, 
13-33. 

Awards(s)

Danny Ervin (2009). Wilson H. Elkins Professorship - University System of Maryland (USM).

* * *

Please send any updates to smfridie@salisbury.edu.

Press Releases: []
Gallons, Judith
Administrative Assistant I, Perdue School of Business
Administrative Assistant I, Economics and Finance
Perdue Hall (PH) 229
410-677-4808 or ext 74808
jagallonssalisburyedu
 
Hill, Brian
Department Chair, Economics and Finance
Perdue Hall (PH) 211
410-677-3860 or ext 73860
bchillsalisburyedu
[website]
 

Education:
M.A., Ph.D., University of Tennessee

Interests:
Public Finance; Applied Microeconomics; Labor Economics; Sports Economics

Website:
http://faculty.salisbury.edu/~bchill/

Courses  []
  • ECON 370-001 INDUSTRIAL ORGANIZATION
    Examines differences in how firms behave and perform under alternative market structures including monopolistic competition, oligopoly, monopoly and pure competition. Analyzes problems created by industrial concentration and public policies for dealing with these problems. Prerequisites: C or better in all of the following: ECON 211, ECON 212, MATH 155, MATH 160 (or 201). Three hours per week.

2014 Fall

  • ECON 336-001 PUBLIC SECTOR ECONOMICS
    Study of the principles, techniques and effects of obtaining and spending funds by governments and the management of governmental debt. Taxes and expenditures of all levels of government in the United States considered. Prerequisites: C or better in all of the following: ECON 211, ECON 212, MATH 155, MATH 160 (or 201). Three hours per week.
  • ECON 460-701 APPLIED ECON WORKSHOP
    Practical experience with methods used by professional economists to measure economic conditions. Students collect, process, evaluate, interpret and report economic data. Satisfies ABLE requirement for business majors in economics track only. Prerequisites: C or better in all of the following: ECON 211, ECON 212, MATH 155, MATH 160 (or 201), INFO 281. Three hours per week.

Visit the GullNet Logon Page to logon and view the entire schedule of classes.

Awards, Scholarship & Creative Works:  []

Article(s)

Hill, B. & Caviglia-Harris, J. 
(In Press). 
Assessment plan & design: A model for enhancing instruction in economics courses. 
International Review of Economics Education, 
Hill, B. & Deskins, J. 
(In Press). 
Have state tax interdependencies changed over time? 
Public Finance Review, 
Hill, B., Deskins, J. & Deskins, S. 
(In Press). 
How do state arts appropriations affect state economic growth? 
Review of Regional Studies, 
Biehl, A., Gurley-Calvez, T. & Hill, B. 
(2014). 
Self-Employment of Older Americans: Do Recessions Matter? 
Small Business Economics, 
42(2), 
297-309. 
Gurley-Calvez, T. & Hill, B. 
(2011). 
Time to Retire? The Effect of State Fiscal Policies on Retirement Decisions. 
American Economic Review Papers & Proceedings, 
101(3), 
35-39. 
Hill, B. C. & Deskins, J. 
(2010). 
State taxes & economic activity revisited: Have distortions changed? 
The Annals of Regional Science, 
44(2), 
331-348. 
Hill, B., Deskins, J. & Ullrich, L. 
(2010). 
Education spending & growth: Are all dollars created equal? 
Economic Development Quarterly, 
24(1), 
45-59. 
Hill, B. C., Bruce, D., Deskins, J. & Rork, J. 
(2009). 
(Small) business activity & state economic growth: Does size matter? 
Regional Studies, 
43(2), 
Hill, B. 
(2008). 
Agglomerations & strategic tax competition. 
Public Finance Review, 
36(6), 
651-677. 
Hill, B. & Murray, M. 
(2008). 
Interactions between welfare caseloads & local labor markets. 
Contemporary Economic Policy, 
26(4), 
539-554. 
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* * *

Please send any updates to smfridie@salisbury.edu.

Press Releases: []

Visit the Press & Publications site for more information.

Johnston, Eric
Lecturer, Economics and Finance
ewjohnstonsalisburyedu
 
Courses  []

2014 Spring

  • FINA 446-151 RETIREMENT PLANNING
    Introduces the student to the study and application of contemporary techniques for individual retirement planning. The instruction will include the retirement field as a profession, as well as the personal financial planning process (budgeting, emergency fund planning, credit and debt management) and personal financial statements. Other specific topics covered include the social security system, Medicare, defined benefit plans versus defined contribution plans, vesting, tax effects of investing, qualified versus nonqualified plans, and tax-advantaged retirement plans (401K, 403b, etc. accounts). Prerequisite: B or better on FINA 311. Three hours per week.

Visit the GullNet Logon Page to logon and view the entire schedule of classes.

Khazeh, Kashi
Faculty, Economics and Finance
Perdue Hall (PH) 213
410-543-6328 or ext 36328
kxkhazehsalisburyedu
[website]
 

Education:
Ph.D., University of Tennessee (1985)

Interests:
Dr. Khazeh's areas of interest include: International Financial Management, Financial Institutions and Markets, and Financial Management

Website:
http://faculty.salisbury.edu/~kxkhazeh/

Courses  []
  • FINA 311-616 FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT
    Addresses fundamental concepts in financial management such as security markets, interest rates, taxes, risk analysis, time value of money, valuation models and related global issues. Explains how financial managers help maximize the value of a firm by making capital budgeting, cost of capital and capital structure decisions. Prerequisites: Majors: admission to the professional program, ECON 211, ECON 212. Minors or others: junior status, ACCT 201, MATH 155, ECON 150 or ECON 211. Three hours per week.
  • FINA 447-610 INTERNATIONAL FINANC MANAG
    Analysis of the foreign exchange markets, exchange rate behavior and risk management, international trade financing, country risk analysis, international banking and the role of direct foreign investment. Prerequisite: B or better in FINA 311. Three hours per week.
  • FINA 447-611 INTERNATIONAL FINANC MANAG
    Analysis of the foreign exchange markets, exchange rate behavior and risk management, international trade financing, country risk analysis, international banking and the role of direct foreign investment. Prerequisite: B or better in FINA 311. Three hours per week.

2014 Summer I

  • FINA 311-610 FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT
    Addresses fundamental concepts in financial management such as security markets, interest rates, taxes, risk analysis, time value of money, valuation models and related global issues. Explains how financial managers help maximize the value of a firm by making capital budgeting, cost of capital and capital structure decisions. Prerequisites: Majors: admission to the professional program, ECON 211, ECON 212. Minors or others: junior status, ACCT 201, MATH 155, ECON 150 or ECON 211. Three hours per week.

2014 Fall

  • FINA 311-610 FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT
    Addresses fundamental concepts in financial management such as security markets, interest rates, taxes, risk analysis, time value of money, valuation models and related global issues. Explains how financial managers help maximize the value of a firm by making capital budgeting, cost of capital and capital structure decisions. Prerequisites: Majors: admission to the professional program, ECON 211, ECON 212. Minors or others: junior status, ACCT 201, MATH 155, ECON 150 or ECON 211. Three hours per week.
  • FINA 311-611 FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT
    Addresses fundamental concepts in financial management such as security markets, interest rates, taxes, risk analysis, time value of money, valuation models and related global issues. Explains how financial managers help maximize the value of a firm by making capital budgeting, cost of capital and capital structure decisions. Prerequisites: Majors: admission to the professional program, ECON 211, ECON 212. Minors or others: junior status, ACCT 201, MATH 155, ECON 150 or ECON 211. Three hours per week.
  • FINA 447-610 INTERNATIONAL FINANC MANAG
    Analysis of the foreign exchange markets, exchange rate behavior and risk management, international trade financing, country risk analysis, international banking and the role of direct foreign investment. Prerequisite: B or better in FINA 311. Three hours per week.

Visit the GullNet Logon Page to logon and view the entire schedule of classes.

Awards, Scholarship & Creative Works:  []

Article(s)

Khazeh, K., Arvi, L. & Winder, R. 
(2014). 
A Comparison of Value-at-Risk Approaches for Multi-national Enterprises. 
International Review of Business Research Papers, 
Khazeh, K., Winder, R.C. & Salimian, F. 
(2013). 
Assessing Transaction Exposure Utilizing Value At Risk Approach: The Holding Period Effect. 
The Journal of Current Research in Global Business, 
16(25), 
50-63. 
Khazeh, K., Winder, R.C., & Salimian, F. 
(2012). 
Value at Risk & Transaction Exposure: Lexicographic Permutation of a Six-Currency Portfolio. 
The Journal of Current Research in Global Business, 
15(24), 
20-31. 
Khazeh, K., Winder, R. C., & Salimian, F. 
(2011). 
Measuring Transaction Exposure Using Value at Risk: Lexicographic Permutation of a Five-Currency Portfolio. 
Journal of Business & Behavioral Sciences, 
23(3), 
35-43. 
Khazeh, K. & Winder, R. C. 
(2010). 
An Inter-Temporal Comparison of Transaction Exposure & Value at Risk. 
Journal of Current Research in Global Business, 
13 (20), 
15-25. 
Khazeh, K. & Winder, R. C. 
(2007). 
Hedging transactions exposure through options & money markets: Empirical findings. 
The Multinational Business Review, 
14(1), 
79-91. 
Khazeh, K., Winder, R. C., Landau, C. & Mathias, H. 
(2006). 
How effective are the effective rates: A long-term view of short-term asset & liability management (Post-Curo empirical findings). 
Journal of Business & Behavioral Sciences, 
(Fall), 
87-94. 
Decker, W. H., Winder, R. C., & Khazeh, K. 
(2005). 
The inclination to switch banks as a function of customer age & bank size. 
Review of Business Research, 
72-83. 
Khazeh, K. and Kincaid, J. F. 
(2002). 
A Long-term view of short-term asset/liability management using foreign currency: Empirical findings. 
The Derivatives Risk Management Service, 
(August), 
4M1-14. 
Khazeh, K. and Winder, R. C. 
(2001). 
Managing transaction exposure through forward & money markets. 
The Derivatives Risk Management Service, 
(August), 
4L1-14. 
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Khazeh, K. & Winder, R. C. 
(2000). 
To cover or not to cover: Empirical findings of a potential foreign financing. 
The Derivatives Risk Management Service, 
(June), 
4H1-13. 
Khazeh, K. and Winder, R. C. 
(2000). 
Short-term asset/liability management using foreign currency. 
The Derivatives Risk Management Service, 
(December), 
4I1-14. 
Khazeh, K. and Winder, R. C. 
(2000). 
Locational arbitrage & bid ask spreads in the market for foreign exchange. 
The Derivatives Risk Management Service, 
(April), 
5I1-8. 
Khazeh, K., Winder, R. C. & Decker, W. H. 
(1996). 
An analysis of attitudes toward the banking system. 
Bankers Magazine, 
179(6), 
55-62. 
Winder, R. C., Khazeh, K., & Decker, W. H. 
(1996). 
Demographics & bank selection decisions. 
The Community Banker - Second Quarter, 
1996, 
32-37. 
Khazeh, K., Winder, R. C. & Decker, W. H. 
(1994). 
The effects of the 1987 stock market crash on the small investor: Perception vs. reality. 
New York Economic Review: Journal of the New York State Economics Association, 
25, 
55-62. 
Khazek, K., & Decker, W. H. 
(1994). 
Mortgage lender selection: Location differences in consumer preferences. 
Real Estate Finance: The Quarterly Review of Commercial Finance Techniques, 
11(2), 
32-35. 
Khazeh, K. & Decker, W. H. 
(1992). 
How customers choose banks. 
Journal of Retail Banking, 
14(4), 
41-44. 
Khazeh, K., Decker, W. H., Winder, R. C., & Neat, M. T. 
(1991). 
Who has ARMs? 
Real Estate Finance: The Quarterly Review of Commercial Finance Techniques, 
7(4), 
57-60. 
Khazeh, K. & Clark, D. P. 
(1990). 
A case study of effects of developing country integration on trade flows: The Andean Pact. 
Journal of Latin American Studies, 
22(2), 
317-330. 
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Khazeh, K., Decker, W. H., & Winder, R. C. 
(1990). 
Consumer preferences toward adjustable & fixed rate mortgages. 
Real Estate Finance: The Quarterly Review of Commercial Finance Techniques, 
7(2), 
65-70. 

Awards(s)

Khazeh, K. (2011). Best Paper Award, Finance & Economic Track - Southeast Decision Sciences Institute, Williamsburg, VA.
Khazeh, K. (2008). Best Paper Award, Finance & Economic Track - Southeast Decision Sciences Institute, Williamsburg, VA.
Kashi Khazeh (2004). Faculty Appreciation Award - Salisbury University Alumni Association, Salisbury, MD.
Kashi Khazeh (2003). Best Paper Award, Finance & Economic Track - Southeast Decision Sciences Institute, Williamsburg, VA.
Khashayar Khazeh (1991). Distinguished Faculty Award - Salisbury University, Salisbury, MD.

Presentations

Khazeh, K., Arvi, L., & Winder, R. (2013). A Comparison of Value-At-Risk Approaches for Multinational Enterprises. Presented at 21st International Business Research Conference , Toronto, Canada.
Khazeh, K., Salimian, F., & Winder, R.C. (2012). Value at Risk & Transaction Exposure: An Inter-Temporal Lexicographic Permutation of a Six-Currency Portfolio. Presented at 7th International American Institute of Higher Education Conference, Williamsburg, VA.
Khazeh, K., Winder, R.C. & Salimian, F. (2012). Assessing Transaction Exposure/Risk Utilizing Value at Risk: The Holding Period Effect. Presented at Annual Meeting, Association for Global Business (AGB), Washington, D.C..
Khazeh, K, Winder, R.C. & Salimian, F. (2011). Value at risk & transaction exposure: A lexicographic permutation of a six-currency portfolio. Presented at Annual Meeting of the Association for Global Business (AGB), Newport Beach, CA.
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Khazeh, K., Winder, R.C. & Salimian, F. (2011). Measuring transaction exposure using value at risk: An application of a five-currency portfolio. Presented at 18th Annual Conference of the American Society of Business & Behavioral Sciences (ASBBS), Las Vegas, NV.
Khazeh, K., Winder, R. C. & Salimian, F. (2010). Measuring transaction exposure using value at risk: An application of a five-currency portfolio. Presented at the annual conference of Northeast Decision Sciences Institute. Presented at Northeast Decision Sciences Institute, Alexandria, VA.
Winder, R. C. & Khazeh, K. (2009). A comparison of approaches to estimating transaction exposure & value at risk. Presented at the 45th annual meeting of SE INFORMS. Presented at Southeast Institute for Operations Research & the Management Sciences (SE INFORMS), Myrtle Beach, SC.
Khazeh, K. & Winder, R. (2008). Transaction exposure & value at risk: A practical application for MNCs. Presented at Southeast Institute for Operations Research & the Management Sciences (SEINFORMS), Myrtle Beach, SC.
Khazeh, K. & Winder, R. (2008). Measuring transaction exposure using value at risk: A comparison of two different time periods. Presented at Annual Meeting of the Association for Global Business, Newport Beach, CA.
Khazeh, K. &  Kincaid, J. (2005). How Effective are the Effective Rates: A Long-Term View of Short-Term Asset & Liability Management (empirical findings) Presented at National Business & Economics Society, Key West, FL.
Khazeh, K. (2004). To Hedge or not to Hedge Transaction Exposure through Currency Options: Empirical Findings Presented at Hawaii International Conference on Business, Honolulu, HI.
Khazeh, K. & Winder, R. C. (2003). Hedging Transaction Exposure through Options & Money Markets: Empirical Findings Presented at AIB-Northeast Annual Conference, Salisbury-Ocean City, MD.
Khazeh, K. & Winder, R. C. (2003). To Hedge or Not to Hedge Transaction Exposure through Money Markets: Empirical Findings Presented at European Applied Business Research Conference, Venice, Italy.
Khazeh, K. (2001). Transaction Exposure Management: Forward Hedge, Money Market Hedge or Both: Empirical Findings Presented at 8th Annual Annual Global Finance Conference, Los Angeles, CA.
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Khazeh, K., Kincaid, J. & Rotondo, D. (2001). Effective Financing Rate & Investment Yield Using Foreign Currency: Empirical Findings Presented at Hawaii Conference on Business, Honolulu, HI.

* * *

Please send any updates to smfridie@salisbury.edu.

Press Releases: []
Manakyan, Ani
Faculty, Economics and Finance
Perdue Hall (PH) 212
410-548-5695 or ext 85695
kamanakyansalisburyedu
 

Education:
Ph.D. Finance, University of Florida
B.S. Finance, University of Maryland

Interests:
Dr. Manakyan's research interests include empirical corporate finance, mutual funds, and behavioral finance.

Courses  []

2014 Spring

  • FINA 311-005 FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT
    Addresses fundamental concepts in financial management such as security markets, interest rates, taxes, risk analysis, time value of money, valuation models and related global issues. Explains how financial managers help maximize the value of a firm by making capital budgeting, cost of capital and capital structure decisions. Prerequisites: Majors: admission to the professional program, ECON 211, ECON 212. Minors or others: junior status, ACCT 201, MATH 155, ECON 150 or ECON 211. Three hours per week.
  • FINA 441-001 INVESTMENTS I
    Examines the capital market and marketable securities traded in the market, with emphasis on stocks and fixed income securities. Topics include portfolio theory, the efficient market hypothesis and evaluation of portfolio performance. Prerequisite: B or better in FINA 311. Three hours per week.
  • FINA 441-002 INVESTMENTS I
    Examines the capital market and marketable securities traded in the market, with emphasis on stocks and fixed income securities. Topics include portfolio theory, the efficient market hypothesis and evaluation of portfolio performance. Prerequisite: B or better in FINA 311. Three hours per week.

2014 Fall

  • FINA 311-003 FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT
    Addresses fundamental concepts in financial management such as security markets, interest rates, taxes, risk analysis, time value of money, valuation models and related global issues. Explains how financial managers help maximize the value of a firm by making capital budgeting, cost of capital and capital structure decisions. Prerequisites: Majors: admission to the professional program, ECON 211, ECON 212. Minors or others: junior status, ACCT 201, MATH 155, ECON 150 or ECON 211. Three hours per week.
  • FINA 441-001 INVESTMENTS I
    Examines the capital market and marketable securities traded in the market, with emphasis on stocks and fixed income securities. Topics include portfolio theory, the efficient market hypothesis and evaluation of portfolio performance. Prerequisite: B or better in FINA 311. Three hours per week.
  • FINA 441-002 INVESTMENTS I
    Examines the capital market and marketable securities traded in the market, with emphasis on stocks and fixed income securities. Topics include portfolio theory, the efficient market hypothesis and evaluation of portfolio performance. Prerequisite: B or better in FINA 311. Three hours per week.

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Awards, Scholarship & Creative Works:  []

Article(s)

Dudley, E. & Manakyan, K.A. 
(2011). 
Corporate Repurchase Decisions Following Mutual Fund Sales. 
Financial Management, 
40(4), 

Awards(s)

Manakyan, K. A. (2010). Outstanding Doctoral Student Paper Award - Southern Finance Association.

Presentations

Gubin, A. & Manakyan, K.A. (2014). How Do Mutual Fund Managers Respond to Outflows? Presented at Perdue School of Business Faculty Research Mini-Conference, Salisbury University, Salsibury, MD.
Kizilaslan, A. & Manakyan, K.A. (2013). Strategic Credit Line Usage and Firm Performance. Presented at Eastern Finance Association, St. Pete Beach, FL.
Kizilaslan, A. & Manakyan, K.A. (2012). Strategic Credit Line Usage and Firm Performance. Presented at Southern Finance Association, Charleston, SC.
Gubin, A. & K.A. Manakyan (2011). How Do Mutual Fund Managers Respond to Outflows? Presented at Southern Finance Association, Key West, FL.
Dudley, E. & Manakyan, K.A. (2010). Corporate Repurchase Decisions Following Mutual Fund Sales. Presented at Financial Management Association, New York, NY.

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Manakyan, Herman
Faculty, Economics and Finance
Perdue Hall (PH) 224
410-677-5024 or ext 75024
hxmanakyansalisburyedu
[website]
 

Education:
B.A., B.S., Berea College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Alabama

Website:
http://facultyfp.salisbury.edu/hxmanakyan/

Courses  []

2014 Spring

  • FINA 311-618 FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT
    Addresses fundamental concepts in financial management such as security markets, interest rates, taxes, risk analysis, time value of money, valuation models and related global issues. Explains how financial managers help maximize the value of a firm by making capital budgeting, cost of capital and capital structure decisions. Prerequisites: Majors: admission to the professional program, ECON 211, ECON 212. Minors or others: junior status, ACCT 201, MATH 155, ECON 150 or ECON 211. Three hours per week.
  • FINA 311-619 FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT
    Addresses fundamental concepts in financial management such as security markets, interest rates, taxes, risk analysis, time value of money, valuation models and related global issues. Explains how financial managers help maximize the value of a firm by making capital budgeting, cost of capital and capital structure decisions. Prerequisites: Majors: admission to the professional program, ECON 211, ECON 212. Minors or others: junior status, ACCT 201, MATH 155, ECON 150 or ECON 211. Three hours per week.
  • FINA 449-151 PRACTICUM IN PORTFOL MANAG
    Practical experience in managing an investment portfolio in a teamwork environment, with emphasis on economic, industry and company analysis; report preparation; security selection; daily decision making; record keeping; and performance evaluation. Students will be responsible for making all material decisions in managing the Perdue School Student Management Investment Fund and will interact regularly with external advisors for feedback on their research Completion of this course satisfies the ABLE requirement. May be repeated for an additional three hours credit. Prerequisite: FINA 441 and consent of instructor. Three hours per week.

2014 Summer I

  • FINA 490-701 FINANCE INTERNSHIP
    Intern experience in finance. May be used as a business concentration/track elective if approved by the school dean. Prerequisites: Finance major; FINA 311 with a B or better grade; placement approval and permission of the department chair; completion of ABLE office administrative requirements. Three hours per week.
  • FINA 490-702 FINANCE INTERNSHIP
    Intern experience in finance. May be used as a business concentration/track elective if approved by the school dean. Prerequisites: Finance major; FINA 311 with a B or better grade; placement approval and permission of the department chair; completion of ABLE office administrative requirements. Three hours per week.

2014 Fall

  • FINA 311-612 FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT
    Addresses fundamental concepts in financial management such as security markets, interest rates, taxes, risk analysis, time value of money, valuation models and related global issues. Explains how financial managers help maximize the value of a firm by making capital budgeting, cost of capital and capital structure decisions. Prerequisites: Majors: admission to the professional program, ECON 211, ECON 212. Minors or others: junior status, ACCT 201, MATH 155, ECON 150 or ECON 211. Three hours per week.
  • FINA 311-613 FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT
    Addresses fundamental concepts in financial management such as security markets, interest rates, taxes, risk analysis, time value of money, valuation models and related global issues. Explains how financial managers help maximize the value of a firm by making capital budgeting, cost of capital and capital structure decisions. Prerequisites: Majors: admission to the professional program, ECON 211, ECON 212. Minors or others: junior status, ACCT 201, MATH 155, ECON 150 or ECON 211. Three hours per week.
  • FINA 449-151 PRACTICUM IN PORTFOL MANAG
    Practical experience in managing an investment portfolio in a teamwork environment, with emphasis on economic, industry and company analysis; report preparation; security selection; daily decision making; record keeping; and performance evaluation. Students will be responsible for making all material decisions in managing the Perdue School Student Management Investment Fund and will interact regularly with external advisors for feedback on their research Completion of this course satisfies the ABLE requirement. May be repeated for an additional three hours credit. Prerequisite: FINA 441 and consent of instructor. Three hours per week.

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Awards, Scholarship & Creative Works:  []

Article(s)

Manakyan, H. 
(2007). 
Establishing linkages to an introductory finance course in real estate electives. 
Journal of Financial Education, 
33, 
87-95. 
Liano, K., Huang, G. C. & Manakyan, H. 
(2003). 
Market reaction to open market stock repurchases & industry affiliation. 
Quarterly Journal of Business & Economics, 
42(1&2), 
97-120. 
Redman, A. L., Tanner, J. R. and Manakyan, H. 
(2002). 
Corporate real estate financing methods: A Statistical study of corporations' choices. 
Journal of Corporate Real Estate, 
4(2), 
169-186. 
Manakyan, H. & Liano, K. 
(2001). 
Performance of focused mutual funds. 
Journal of Business & Economic Perspectives, 
27(1), 
91-101. 
Manakyan, H., Liano, K. and Huang, G. C. 
(2000). 
An Alternataive explanation of the market reaction to dividend changes. 
Advances in Financial Planning & Forecasting, 
9, 
253-278. 
Redman, A. L., Gullett, N. S. and Manakyan, H. 
(2000). 
The Performance of global & international mutual funds. 
Journal of Financial & Strategic Decisions, 
13(1), 
75-85. 
Liano, K., Liano, K. & Manakyan, H. 
(1999). 
Presidential administrations & day-of-the-week effect in stock returns. 
Review of Financial Economics, 
8, 
93-99. 
Redman, A. L., Manakyan, H. & Tanner, J. R. 
(1999). 
A normalized citation analysis of real estate journals. 
Real Estate Economics, 
27(1), 
169-182. 

* * *

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Press Releases: []

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Melstrom, Max
Faculty, Economics and Finance
Faculty, Environmental Studies
Perdue Hall (PH) 217
410-548-5696 or ext 85696
rtmelstromsalisburyedu
[website]
 

Education:
Ph.D. Economics and Agricultural, Food and Resource Economics, Michigan State University
M.A. Economics, Michigan State University
B.A. Economics and Business, Kalamazoo College

Interests:
Resource economics, ecological economics, nonmarket valuation, economic history, public economics

Website:
http://faculty.salisbury.edu/~rtmelstrom/

Courses  []

2014 Spring

  • ENVR 210-001 PRINCIPLES OF ENVIRO ECON
    Introduction to the ideas and tools economists use to understand human behavior that is constrained by scarce resources with applications to environmental policy. Analytic tools, including demand and supply analysis, will be used to introduce students to policies to address externalities, including the use of taxes, subsidies and marketable pollution permits. Three hours per week with enhancement.
  • ENVR 210-002 PRINCIPLES OF ENVIRO ECON
    Introduction to the ideas and tools economists use to understand human behavior that is constrained by scarce resources with applications to environmental policy. Analytic tools, including demand and supply analysis, will be used to introduce students to policies to address externalities, including the use of taxes, subsidies and marketable pollution permits. Three hours per week with enhancement.
  • ENVR 400-001 CONTEMPORARY ENVR ISSUES
    Discussion seminar focused upon the review and analysis of environmental topics in the mainstream media. Prerequisite: ENVR 102. One hour per week.
  • ENVR 480-002 INTERNSHIP IN ENVIRO STUDIES
    Provides opportunities to apply theory, principles and knowledge within a practical experience in a local, state, federal or private organization. Major paper and journal required. Prerequisite: Written permission of environmental studies advisor. Eight hours a week for 14 weeks or equivalent.

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Awards, Scholarship & Creative Works:  []

Article(s)

Melstrom, R.T. & Horan, R.D, 
(2013). 
Managing excessive predation in a predator-endangered prey setting. 
Ecological Economics, 
90, 
85-93. 

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Please send any updates to smfridie@salisbury.edu.

Munemo, Jonathan
Faculty, Economics and Finance
Perdue Hall (PH) 206
410-677-0057 or ext 70057
jxmunemosalisburyedu
[website]
 

Education:
Ph.D. Economics, West Virginia University, 2005
M.A. Economics, West Virginia University, 2002
MSc. Economics, University of Zimbabwe, 1995
BSc. Economics, University of Zimbabwe, 1993

Interests:
Dr. Munemo's teaching interests include principles of economics, intermediate macroeconomics,intermediate microeconomics, money and banking, and international economics.

His research interests include foreign aid, international factor mobility, international trade policies, and development of low income countries.

Website:
http://faculty.salisbury.edu/~jxmunemo/

Courses  []
  • ECON 211-001 MICRO-ECONOMIC PRINCIPLES
    Introduction to the ideas and tools economists use to understand human behavior constrained by scarce resources. Analytical tools introduced include supply and demand analysis, elasticities, models of perfect and imperfect competition. These tools will be used to study topics such as consumer and producer decision making, taxation, environmental quality and health care. Three hours per week. Meets General Education IIIB or IIIC (Prior to Fall 2008: IIB).
  • ECON 441-001 INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS
    Study of the basic economic concepts and theories for international business, international trade and finance, commercial policy, and foreign investment and multinational firms. Prerequisites: C or better in all of the following: ECON 211, ECON 212, MATH 155. Three hours per week.

2014 Fall

  • ECON 211-007 MICRO-ECONOMIC PRINCIPLES
    Introduction to the ideas and tools economists use to understand human behavior constrained by scarce resources. Analytical tools introduced include supply and demand analysis, elasticities, models of perfect and imperfect competition. These tools will be used to study topics such as consumer and producer decision making, taxation, environmental quality and health care. Three hours per week. Meets General Education IIIB or IIIC (Prior to Fall 2008: IIB).
  • ECON 211-008 MICRO-ECONOMIC PRINCIPLES
    Introduction to the ideas and tools economists use to understand human behavior constrained by scarce resources. Analytical tools introduced include supply and demand analysis, elasticities, models of perfect and imperfect competition. These tools will be used to study topics such as consumer and producer decision making, taxation, environmental quality and health care. Three hours per week. Meets General Education IIIB or IIIC (Prior to Fall 2008: IIB).
  • ECON 601-610 BUSINESS ECONOMICS
    Introduces the fundamentals of microeconomic and macroeconomic theory and their application to the business environment. The key objective is to equip student with the basic skills, insights and decision-making tools that are necessary to make sound business decisions. In addition, understand and explain the forces that shape the external business environment, such as aggregate demand, economic fluctuations, inflation, interest rates, exchange rates, and the role that demand management policies play in the economy and their impact on firm performance. Topical areas include, but are not limited to, the following: demand analysis, determination of costs, pricing, profitability, commercial (trade) policy and international macroeconomic policy. Prerequisites: Admission to the M.B.A. program and ECON 211, 212 or 150 (or the equivalent) foundation courses with a grade of C or better. Six hours per week.

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Awards, Scholarship & Creative Works:  []

Article(s)

Munemo, J. 
(2013). 
Domestic Credit and Diversification of Manufactured Exports from Developing Countries.
Development Policy Review, 31(1), 99-114.
Munemo, J. 
(2013). 
Regulation of Entry and the Variety of Manufactured Exports from Developing Countries. 
The Journal of Developing Areas, 
47(1), 
207-222. 
Munemo, J. 
(2013). 
Domestic credit & diversification of manufactured exports from developing countries. 
Development Policy Review, 
31(1, 
99-114. 
Munemo, J. 
(2013). 
Regulation of entry & the variety of manufactured exports from developing countries. 
The Journal of Developing Areas, 
47(1), 
207-222. 
Munemo, J. 
(2013). 
Trade Between China and South Africa: Prospects of a Successful SACU-China Free Trade Agreement. 
African Development Review, 
25(3), 
303-329. 
Munemo, J. 
(2013). 
Examining Imports of Capital Goods from China as a Channel for Technology Transfer and Growth in Sub-Saharan Africa.
Journal of African Business, 14(2), 106-116.
Munemo, J. 
(2012). 
Entrepreneurship in Developing Countries: Is Africa Different? 
Journal of Developmental Entrepreneurship, 
17(1), 
1-12. 
Munemo, J. 
(2012). 
Business Regulations & Private Domestic Investment in Africa. 
Journal of African Business, 
13(2), 
157-164. 
Munemo, J. 
(2011). 
The effect of external finance on Africa's variety of manufactured exports to the European Union. 
The African Finance Journal, 
13(2), 
157-164. 
Munemo, J. 
(2011). 
Foreign aid & export diversification in developing countries. 
Journal of International Trade & Economic Development, 
20(3), 
339-355. 
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* * *

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Press Releases: []

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O'Donnell, J. Joseph
Lecturer, Economics and Finance
jjodonnellsalisburyedu
 

Interests:
Law, Economics, Risk Management

Courses  []

2014 Spring

  • FINA 312-001 RISK MGMT & INSURANCE
    Examines principles and practices of asset and income conservation for businesses and individuals through various risk-management techniques including insurance. Prerequisite: B or better in FINA 311. Three hours per week.
  • FINA 490-001 FINANCE INTERNSHIP
    Intern experience in finance. May be used as a business concentration/track elective if approved by the school dean. Prerequisites: Finance major; FINA 311 with a B or better grade; placement approval and permission of the department chair; completion of ABLE office administrative requirements. Three hours per week.
  • FINA 491-701 ADVANCED FINANC INTERNSHIP
    Research associated with an internship experience in finance. Prerequisites: FINA 490 or completion of one to three hours per week ABLE requirement, placement approval and permission of the department chair, completion of ABLE administrative requirements. One to three hours per week.

2014 Fall

  • FINA 312-001 RISK MGMT & INSURANCE
    Examines principles and practices of asset and income conservation for businesses and individuals through various risk-management techniques including insurance. Prerequisite: B or better in FINA 311. Three hours per week.
  • FINA 490-601 FINANCE INTERNSHIP
    Intern experience in finance. May be used as a business concentration/track elective if approved by the school dean. Prerequisites: Finance major; FINA 311 with a B or better grade; placement approval and permission of the department chair; completion of ABLE office administrative requirements. Three hours per week.

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Selzer, Christine
Lecturer, Economics and Finance
cmselzersalisburyedu
 
Courses  []

2014 Spring

  • FINA 450-151 CASE STUDIES: PERS FIN PLAN
    Examines professional issues in financial planning, including ethical consideration, regulation and certification requirements, written communication skills, and professional responsibility. Utilize skills obtained in other courses and work experiences in the completion of a comprehensive personal finance case, other mini-case studies and calculation templates. Prerequisites: FINA 311, FINA 441, and FINA 446 or FINA 448. Three hours per week.

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Twilley, Brian
Lecturer, Economics and Finance
bxtwilleysalisburyedu
 
Courses  []
  • FINA 104-001 PERSONAL FINANCE
    Comprehensive survey of personal financial topics including budgeting; borrowing; savings and investments; life, health and casualty insurance; and home buying. Emphasis on lifetime economic cycle. Three hours per week.

2014 Fall

  • FINA 104-001 PERSONAL FINANCE
    Comprehensive survey of personal financial topics including budgeting; borrowing; savings and investments; life, health and casualty insurance; and home buying. Emphasis on lifetime economic cycle. Three hours per week.

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Wu, Ying
Faculty, Economics and Finance
Perdue Hall (PH) 203
410-543-6343 or ext 36343
yxwusalisburyedu
[website]
 

Education:
Ph.D. Economics, University of Oregon

Interests:
Dr Wu's research interest are in macroeconomics, monetary economics, international economics, and Pacific-Rim economies

Website:
http://faculty.salisbury.edu/~yxwu/

Courses  []
  • ECON 212-001 MACRO-ECONOMIC PRINCIPLES
    Explores forces behind business consumer purchases, capital spending and the balance of payments and their relationship to unemployment, inflation and the value of the dollar abroad. Also examines the effect of government spending, taxation and money supply policies on the economy's performance. Prerequisite: ECON 211. Three hours per week. Meets General Education IIIB or IIIC (Prior to Fall 2008: IIB).
  • ECON 305-001 INTERMEDIATE MACRO-THEORY
    Study of the theory of economic aggregates through the use of national income accounts to determine the effect of certain key variables on employment and production. Key variables studied include savings and investment, the quantity of money, the velocity of money, the rate of interest and consumption. Prerequisites: C or better in all of the following: ECON 211, ECON 212, MATH 155, MATH 160 (or 201). Three hours per week.

Visit the GullNet Logon Page to logon and view the entire schedule of classes.

Awards, Scholarship & Creative Works:  []

Article(s)

Wu, Y. 
(2012). 
Revisiting the Marshall-Lerner Condition under Processing Trade - Empirical Evidence from China. 
Journal of International & Global Economic Studies, 
5(1), 
17-34. 
Wu, Y. & Yao, H. 
(2012). 
Economic Openness & Income Inequality: Chinese Provincial Evidence in the 1990s. 
China Economic Policy Review, 
1(2), 
1-21. 
Wu, Y. 
(2010). 
Exchange rates & prices under processing trade: A macroeconomic analysis. 
Atlantic Economic Journal, 
38(3), 
345-357. 
Wu, Y. 
(2009). 
Measuring China's monetary sterilization & autonomy in the era of globalization: 1995-2005. 
Journal of Asian Economics, 
20(3), 
336-347. 
Chambers, D. L., Wu, Y. & Yao, H. 
(2008). 
The Impact of Past Growth on Poverty in Chinese Provinces. Named one of the Journal of Asian Economics' "Top 25 Hottest Articles" in the category of economics, econometrics and finance. 
Journal of Asian Economics, 
19(4), 
348-357. 
Chambers, D., Wu, Y., & Yao, H. 
(2008). 
A Tale of Two Provinces: How Growth Can Help or Hinder Equality in China? 
International Research Journal of Finance & Economics, 
Issue 12, 
214-219. 
Wu,Y. 
(2008). 
A Macroeconomic Analysis of Foreign Assets & Foreign Liabilities. 
Journal of Economics & Finance, 
32(2), 
119-135. 
Wu, Y. & Yao, H. 
(2007). 
Labor Leasing, Direct Hiring, & Efficiency Wages. 
International Journal of Applied Economics, 
4(2), 
46-61. 
Wu, Y. 
(2006). 
The RMB exchange rate & monetary sterilization in. 
China: An International Journal, 
4(1), 
32-59. 
Wu, Y. & Chengyu, Q. 
(2006). 
Pay, Training, & Quitting: A Contract Model. 
China Industrial Economy, 
23(12), 
113-119. 
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Wu, Y. & Yao, H. 
(2006). 
Entrepreneurs & Professionals: Their Relative Supplies & Returns - A Perspective from Economic Growth. 
International Journal of Applied Economics, 
3(2), 
21-39. 
Wu, Y. 
(2005). 
A Modified Currency Board System: Theory & Evidence. 
Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions, & Money, 
15(4), 
353-367. 
Wu, Y. 
(2005). 
Determining a Modified Currency Board's Two-Period Exchange Rate Strategy. 
International Advances in Economic Research, 
11(4), 
347-357. 
Ng, Y. & Wu, Y. 
(2004). 
Multiple Equilibria & Interfirm Macro-Externality: An Analysis of Sluggish Real Adjustment. 
Annals of Economics & Finance, 
5(1), 
61-77. 
Wu, Y. 
(2004). 
Singapore's Collective Bargaining in a Game of Wage & Exchange Rate Policies. 
Open Economies Review, 
15(3), 
273-289. 
Wu, Y., Goh, K. H., & Lee, B. K. 
(2004). 
The Interplay of Wage & Exchange Rate Policies in Singapore: A Case of Collective Bargaining in Macroeconomic Management. 
Contemporary Economic Policy, 
22(1), 
39-49. 
Wu, Y. and Wang, R. 
(2003). 
Monetary sterilization of capital inflows through the Central-Provident-Fund Savings in Singapore. 
Review of Pacific Basin Financial Markets & Policies, 
6(1), 
65-86. 
Wu, Y. 
(1999). 
Exchange rate & wage movements under quasi-sterilization: Singapore experience. 
Pacific Economic Review, 
4(2), 
185-201. 
Wu, Y. 
(1999). 
More on monetary policy in a small open economy: A credit view. 
International Review of Economics & Finance, 
8, 
223-235. 

Awards(s)

Wu, Y. (2010-2011). Fulbright Scholar Award - U. S. Dept. of State, Council for International Exchange of Scholars.
Ying, W. (2009). Best Paper Award, Economics Category - Academy of Economics & Finance.
Ying Wu (2007). Distinguished Faculty Award - Salisbury University, Salisbury, MD.

Book(s)

Wu, Y. (1994) An Analysis of Credit and Equilibrium Credit Rationing. New York & London: Garland Publishing.

Presentations

Wu, Y. (2010). Will RMB appreciation reduce China's exports? - A perspective from processing trade. Presented at the Academy of Economics & Finance annual meeting. Presented at Academy of Economics & Finance, Houston, TX.
Wu, Y. (2010). Revisiting the Marshall-Lerner condition from processing trade: China experience. Presentation at the 18th annual conference on Pacific Basin Finance, Economics, Accounting, & Management (PBFEAM): "Pacific impact on global economy recovery," at the Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences. Presented at Pacific Basin Finance, Economics, Accounting, & Management (PBFEAM), Beijing, China.
Wu, Y. & Yao, H. (2010). Does macroeconomic policy affect poverty & income inequality? Presentation at the 18th annual conference of Pacific Basin Finance, Economics, Accounting, & Management (PBFEAM): "Pacific Impact on Global Economy Recovery," at the Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences. Presented at Pacific Basin Finance, Economics, Accounting, & Management (PBFEAM), Beijing, China.
Wu, Y. & Chu, Y. (2009). Determinants of U.S. consumption expenditures: 1999-2008. Presented at the Academy of Economics & Finance annual meeting. Presented at Academy of Economics & Finance, Pensacola, FL.
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Wu, Y. & Yao, H. (2009). Credit multiplier effects of foreign exchange reserves under monetary sterilization & capital adequacy constraints: A preliminaray analysis & evidence from China (2002-2008). Presented at the RCIE annual conference "China & the World Economy," University of International Business & Economics. Presented at RCIE, Beijing, China.
Wu, Y. (2008). A macroeconomic analysis of foreign assets & foreign liabilities. Presented at American Committee for Asian Economic Studies (ACAE), Bologna, Italy.
Wu, Y. (2006). A cointegration analysis of monetary endogeneity in China: 1995-2005. Presented at the 60th International Atlantic Economic Conference. Presented at International Atlantic Economic Conference, Berlin, Germany.
Wu, Y. (2006). Comparing outsourcing with labor leasing. Presented at the Academy of Economics & Finance Annual Meeting. Presented at Academy of Economics & Finance Annual Meeting, Houston, TX.
Wu, Y. (2006). Revisiting Singapore's exchange rate & public debt policies before the Asian financial crisis. Presented at the Academy of Economics & Finance Annual Meeting. Presented at Academy of Economics & Finance, Houston, TX.

Book Chapters

Wu, Y. (2006). On the Intertemporal Sustainability of Fiscal Debt in China. The Chinese Economy after WTO Accession. (111-124.) Aldershot & Burlington: Ashegate Publishing.
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Wu, Y. (2006). Policy Cooperation between Wage & Exchange Rates in Singapore. Encyclopedia of Finance (715-723.) Springer.
Wu, Y. (2006). Equilibrium Credit Rationing & Monetary Nonneutrality in a Small Open Economy. Encyclopedia of Finance. (705-714.) Springer.

* * *

Please send any updates to smfridie@salisbury.edu.

Yao, Hong
Faculty, Economics and Finance
Perdue Hall (PH) 220
410-543-6327 or ext 36327
hxyaosalisburyedu
 

Education:
B.A., M.A., Peking Univeristy (China); Ph.D., University of Oregon-Engene

Courses  []

2014 Spring

  • ECON 211-003 MICRO-ECONOMIC PRINCIPLES
    Introduction to the ideas and tools economists use to understand human behavior constrained by scarce resources. Analytical tools introduced include supply and demand analysis, elasticities, models of perfect and imperfect competition. These tools will be used to study topics such as consumer and producer decision making, taxation, environmental quality and health care. Three hours per week. Meets General Education IIIB or IIIC (Prior to Fall 2008: IIB).
  • ECON 211-004 MICRO-ECONOMIC PRINCIPLES
    Introduction to the ideas and tools economists use to understand human behavior constrained by scarce resources. Analytical tools introduced include supply and demand analysis, elasticities, models of perfect and imperfect competition. These tools will be used to study topics such as consumer and producer decision making, taxation, environmental quality and health care. Three hours per week. Meets General Education IIIB or IIIC (Prior to Fall 2008: IIB).
  • ECON 306-001 INTERMEDIATE MICRO-THEORY
    Study of supply and demand relationships under the various market classifications. Major topics include the market forms, the principles of production, costs of production, resource allocation and income distribution with some discussion of welfare economics. Prerequisites: C or better in all of the following: ECON 211, ECON 212, MATH 155, MATH 160 (or 201). Three hours per week.

2014 Fall

  • ECON 211-001 MICRO-ECONOMIC PRINCIPLES
    Introduction to the ideas and tools economists use to understand human behavior constrained by scarce resources. Analytical tools introduced include supply and demand analysis, elasticities, models of perfect and imperfect competition. These tools will be used to study topics such as consumer and producer decision making, taxation, environmental quality and health care. Three hours per week. Meets General Education IIIB or IIIC (Prior to Fall 2008: IIB).
  • ECON 211-002 MICRO-ECONOMIC PRINCIPLES
    Introduction to the ideas and tools economists use to understand human behavior constrained by scarce resources. Analytical tools introduced include supply and demand analysis, elasticities, models of perfect and imperfect competition. These tools will be used to study topics such as consumer and producer decision making, taxation, environmental quality and health care. Three hours per week. Meets General Education IIIB or IIIC (Prior to Fall 2008: IIB).
  • ECON 338-001 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ECONOMICS
    In-depth study of varying economic issues not covered in other economics courses. Students may repeat this course under a different topic. Prerequisites: ECON 211, 212. Three hours per week.

Visit the GullNet Logon Page to logon and view the entire schedule of classes.

Awards, Scholarship & Creative Works:  []

Article(s)

Decker, W.H., Calo, T.J., Weer, C.H. & Yao, H. 
(2013). 
Senior Management Aspirations in China and the U.S.: Effects of Gender and Cultural Values. 
Journal of International Management Studies, 
13(3), 
107-. 
Wu, Y. & Yao, H. 
(2012). 
Economic Openness & Income Inequality: Chinese Provincial Evidence in the 1990s. 
China Economic Policy Review, 
1(2), 
1-21. 
Chambers, D. L., Wu, Y. & Yao, H. 
(2008). 
The Impact of Past Growth on Poverty in Chinese Provinces. Named one of the Journal of Asian Economics' "Top 25 Hottest Articles" in the category of economics, econometrics and finance. 
Journal of Asian Economics, 
19(4), 
348-357. 
Chambers, D., Wu, Y., & Yao, H. 
(2008). 
A Tale of Two Provinces: How Growth Can Help or Hinder Equality in China? 
International Research Journal of Finance & Economics, 
Issue 12, 
214-219. 
Wu, Y. & Yao, H. 
(2007). 
Labor Leasing, Direct Hiring, & Efficiency Wages. 
International Journal of Applied Economics, 
4(2), 
46-61. 
Wu, Y. & Yao, H. 
(2006). 
Entrepreneurs & Professionals: Their Relative Supplies & Returns - A Perspective from Economic Growth. 
International Journal of Applied Economics, 
3(2), 
21-39. 

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Please send any updates to smfridie@salisbury.edu.